Thursday, September 13th, 2007


Murder suspect's bond remains at $1M
Bond will remain at $1 million, at least for now, for the Findlay man accused of stabbing his roommate to death at an East Sandusky Street apartment last week.
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Central School decision expected
A decision on whether students will return to Findlay's Central Middle School next week may come today.
more >>
Findlay's YMCA bouncing back
Nearly a month after the Aug. 21-22 flood swamped the Findlay area, the downtown Findlay Family YMCA will reopen to the public — with regular hours — on Monday.
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Some YMCA classes canceled
Because of the extensive flood damage and subsequent closing of the Findlay Family YMCA for nearly a month, 13 programs and classes have been canceled for the fall class session.
more >>
Finders Records won't reopen after flood
Last month’s flood has silenced Finders Records Tapes & CDs in downtown Findlay.
more >>
Back In Business
The following Findlay area businesses, closed by the recent flooding, have announced their reopening:
more >>
Flood debris collection centers to be removed after today
Flood debris collection centers in Findlay will be in place through the end of today. After that, residents will be responsible for disposing of their flood trash.
more >>
Bluffton looking to recoup some flood expenses
BLUFFTON — Bluffton officials will sit down with federal representatives next week to start the process of recouping some of the village's expenses from last month's flood.
more >>
Flood injuries, illnesses keep hospital busy
Blanchard Valley Hospital didn’t receive much damage in last month’s flood, but it did treat the damaged.
more >>
Tour of Homes to begin
Reflecting the slumping housing market, Findlay's annual fashion show of new homes will display more affordable models this weekend.
more >>
Housing construction slows down
The pace of housing construction has slowed down in the Findlay area.
more >>
New judge to be appointed for Richey retrial
OTTAWA (AP) — A judge who prosecuted a U.S.-British citizen in a death penalty case 20 years ago has stepped aside from taking part in the man's retrial.
more >>
Commissioner accused of shoplifting
TIFFIN — The newest Seneca County commissioner has been charged with misdemeanor theft for allegedly stealing three packs of Rolaids from a Tiffin grocery store.
more >>
Public Record
Docket
more >>
Local News

Murder suspect's bond remains at $1M

By J. STEVEN DILLON

STAFF WRITER

Bond will remain at $1 million, at least for now, for the Findlay man accused of stabbing his roommate to death at an East Sandusky Street apartment last week.

Judge Kevin Smith first established bond in that amount for Joshua B. Fox, 30, on Monday, and continued that bond Wednesday during the defendant’s initial court appearance in Findlay Municipal Court.

Hancock County Prosecutor Mark Miller had requested the high bond, telling the court that Fox has made statements to police implicating himself in the murder of Jeffrey E. Harmon, 38, who died after suffering multiple stab wounds.

Miller also noted that Fox has a fairly extensive criminal record and has served time in prison in Michigan, where he is considered a habitual offender due to multiple felony convictions.

Miller told Judge Smith that the suspect has few ties to this community, no job here, and had fled the area after the homicide.

“We believe he would represent a danger to the community if he would be released,” Miller said.

Smith concurred with the prosecutor’s request, but said the issue of bond could be addressed again at a later date if needed.

The judge continued the case until a preliminary hearing on Sept. 19. However, that court date would be abandoned if Fox is indicted by a Hancock County grand jury before then. If indicted, Fox’s prosecution would be moved to Hancock County Common Pleas Court.

Fox, who requested a court-appointed attorney on Wednesday, is accused of killing Harmon on or about Sept. 3 during a robbery in an apartment they shared at 737 E. Sandusky St., a building known by some as “the palace.”

Harmon’s body was discovered Sept. 5 in Apartment 9, which had been leased to Fox.

Fox himself wasn’t located until Friday, when he was found at a relative’s home in Rockford, Tenn. He was held there initially on an outstanding warrant from Michigan. A local warrant was obtained after he was linked to the murder, and he was returned to Hancock County on Sunday in the company of two city police detectives.

Fox is now being held in the Hancock County jail.

Fox spoke little in the court Wednesday, other than to indicate he understood the charge that has been filed against him and the possible penalty -- 15 years to life -- if he’s convicted.

At one point, the defendant asked Judge Smith to bar the media from the proceedings, a request the judge denied. A photographer, videographer and reporter were present at the hearing.

“All proceedings before the court are open to the public,” Smith said.

Police have not disclosed why Harmon was murdered, what was stolen from the residence, or if the murder weapon has been recovered.

Police Lt. Chuck Wilson said earlier this week that police were hoping to interview several other people, and it was not clear Wednesday if others would be charged in the case.

Contact staff writer J. Steven Dillon at: (419) 427-8423 stevedillon@thecourier.com

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Central School decision expected

By DENISE GRANT

Staff Writer

A decision on whether students will return to Findlay's Central Middle School next week may come today.

Superintendent Dean Wittwer said Wednesday that after repairing flood damage, the school district must have a permit from the Wood County Building Inspector's Office before Central can be opened to students. School officials are hoping to have that permit today.

Repairs to the cafeteria and art room, located in the school's basement, are nearly complete, and the air quality in the building is good, he said. Student classrooms, which are located on the top two floors of the building, were unaffected by the August flood.

Central students this week are attending classes in space provided by Owens Community College and the Findlay Evangelical Free Church, to allow time for repairs to be made to the cafeteria and art room.



Administrative offices

Once students are back at Central, restoration work on the basement's main corridor, which had housed the district's administrative offices, can begin.

Central has been home to the administrative offices since the early 1980s, when the offices were moved there from the old Huber School building at 1001 Blanchard Ave. Enrollment in the city schools was dropping at the time, and the offices were moved in an effort to consolidate school buildings and save money on energy bills.

The district's technology hub, a more recent addition to Central, was also heavily damaged in the flood.

With district administrators now scattered throughout city school buildings, the school board will most likely have to lease office space to bring those head offices back together again and allow them to function normally.

Superintendent Wittwer, who can be found these days working out of a "cubbyhole" at Findlay High School, says the school board will have to decide whether the administrative offices should be returned to the basement of Central.



Facility planning

Board member Dr. Eric Browning wants a school facilities plan that goes beyond just flood recovery, and at Monday's board meeting urged the board to organize a facilities committee to study the needs of the district.

His suggestion, however, caused frustration for Marty Rothey, who has served on the city school board for 13 years. She has seen long-term facility plans fall through or fall by the wayside in the past.

"I at least want people to go back and look at those studies and not duplicate something we have already done," Rothey told the Courier on Wednesday.

That topic will be revisited on Oct. 15, when the school board hosts its first community forum of the school year. The board has decided to make facility planning, both immediate and long-term, the topic of the forum. The time and location of the meeting have yet to be announced.

Wittwer admits that the issue of school facilities continues to be a problem for the city schools, and the flood served to bring the issue back to the forefront.

It's a challenge, but Wittwer says he likes a challenge, and it may just be a matter of looking at the current circumstances differently.

It's most likely that most of the damages and expenses incurred by the district due to the flood will be covered by insurance, federal relief or state aid. The school district should be well positioned to recover from the flood — and perhaps, to even move forward.

Recent events have brought the Ohio School Facilities Commission back to town for another look at Findlay's school buildings. The commission has been helping with estimates on the flood damages.

Wittwer said the commission seems willing to talk about possible solutions for the city schools.

In 2002, the commission recommended a $127 million plan for improving the city's school buildings, but only offered to pay 24 percent of the bill, based on the wealth of the school district.

That would leave local taxpayers coming up with 76 percent or $96.6 million — the equivalent of almost 9 mills in property valuation at the time.

The school board decided the plan was far too expensive to consider pursuing.

"Maybe we can't afford a top to bottom fix in this school district," Wittwer said Wednesday. "We could still use some help."

Contact staff writer Denise Grant at:

(419) 427-8412

denisegrant@thecourier.com

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Findlay's YMCA bouncing back

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

Nearly a month after the Aug. 21-22 flood swamped the Findlay area, the downtown Findlay Family YMCA will reopen to the public — with regular hours — on Monday.

The East Lincoln Street facility sustained nearly $750,000 worth of damage, and had to replace all electrical and mechanical equipment, and pumps to both pools.

The elevator will have to be replaced, too, and won't be operational for several months yet.

Administrative offices were also damaged by the floodwaters, including all furniture and files stored there. Those offices have been temporarily relocated to the main level of the facility, with future plans to make the move permanent.

The floodwaters dumped nearly 6½ feet of water throughout the lower level of the facility, causing the equipment failure. Electrical service was restored Aug. 29. Large generators were brought to the scene to provide electric power in the interim.

"The equipment that we worked on to get started (reopened) is still in need of replacement because of the damage done by the contaminated water that contained chemicals and oils that will cause it to fail in the very near future if not replaced now," Executive Director Russ Gartner said in a written statement.

"We expect that all facilities will be usable, with the possible exception of the west pool," he said. The opening of that pool may be delayed for a few additional days, for installation of a new pump.

While several other pumps for other pieces of equipment are on order, too, enough pumps are working to allow operations to begin, he added.

Over the next few weeks, as the new equipment arrives, the old equipment will be replaced. That work won't impact regular operations.

"We want to make sure that the entire YMCA is properly cleaned and sanitized wherever floodwaters were present," Gartner said. "Tests for air quality throughout the entire building have been returned to us and indicate that the quality of air is excellent throughout the entire facility."

He praised the quick efforts to pump out the floodwaters, and remove carpet and drywall in the lower level as reasons for the positive air quality report.

"We owe a tremendous amount of thanks to the extraordinary work of the staff and the many volunteers that stepped up to work, literally day and night throughout the ordeal," he said.

He also praised the quick response of several area contractors who assisted in the cleanup effort, including Alvada Construction, Eric Pelton Dry Wall, H&R Electric, Northwest Trane, Miller Steam Extraction, and Yates and Young Plumbing.

The administrative offices have been moved to the main level of the YMCA, replacing one of the youth game rooms and the chapel area, Gartner stated. Plans are to redesign the main level over the next six months to allow permanent relocation of the offices.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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Some YMCA classes canceled

Because of the extensive flood damage and subsequent closing of the Findlay Family YMCA for nearly a month, 13 programs and classes have been canceled for the fall class session.

They are:

• Master swimming.

• Preschool gym and swim.

• Private swim lessons.

• Bridge.

• Fall scrapbooking.

• Donuts with Daddy.

• Teen strength training.

• All Pilates classes.

• Yoga I.

• Basketball classes for youngsters 4-6 years old.

• Basketball classes for youngsters in grades 1-4.

• Friday Fun Club.

• Wee Sign Together.

The following four programs are being offered on a limited basis, or have been postponed during the fall class session:

• Infant, toddler and preschool, running on limited basis — schedules available at YMCA.

• Youth progressive, running on limited basis — schedules available at YMCA.

• Water volleyball and lap swimming in west pool, postponed until further notice.

• 500 Mile Club, postponed until further notice.

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Finders Records won't reopen after flood

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

Last month’s flood has silenced Finders Records Tapes & CDs in downtown Findlay.

The 32-year fixture at the southeast corner of Main and Crawford streets will not reopen, President and Owner Greg Halamay said.

He said it would take four to six months to get the store back into business condition. Halamay, who owns the building, said he has neither the time nor money to do it.

“I have no cash flow without that store being open,” Halamay said.

He also has owned the Finders store in Bowling Green for 36 years. Halamay said he wants to focus on that one, which has generated most of his sales volume.

“I wasn’t interested in jeopardizing my Bowling Green operation, which is thriving, in order to save the Findlay store,” he said.

“The flood brought an overwhelming experience to a lot of people. I’m one of them,” Halamay added. “This isn’t how I wanted to depart a city that helped us for 32 years.”

The word that Halamay uttered over and over again was “overwhelming.”

“Putting a store that size together again, the whole idea is just overwhelming to me,” he said.

Water literally filled the basement at 403 S. Main St., rising eight feet and soaking the sales floor at ground level.

To open for business, Halamay would have to replace carpeting and subfloor on the first floor, which is 6,500 square feet. “Countless” fixtures and counters also would have to be replaced.

Saturated drywall, plaster and fixtures are being removed from the basement, which was the location of a bar in the 1960s.

“After 32 years, I’m not really interested in reinvesting in the store,” Halamay said.

He employed 8-10 people there, who now are jobless. Even if he went through the time and expense of getting the Findlay store ready for business, he probably would have to find new employees, Halamay said.

Halamay said the building at 403 S. Main St. will be for sale or lease at some point.

Contact staff writer Lou Wilin at: (419) 427-8413 louwilin@thecourier.com

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Back In Business

The following Findlay area businesses, closed by the recent flooding, have announced their reopening:

• Bistro on Main, 407 S. Main St.

• Car Craft Collision, 225 E. Front St.

• Findlay Massotherapy Clinic, 404 E. Lincoln St.

• Jess Service Center, 1016 Tiffin Ave.

• LaRiche Chevrolet-Cadillac, 215 E. Main Cross St.



Reopenings that were announced recently:

• Angel Hands Massage Therapy, 110 S. Main St.

• The Architect, at a new location — 1665 Tiffin Ave.

• Christian Book & Gift Store, 438 Tiffin Ave.

• Cramer Signs, 231 E. Front St.

• Creative Hair Designs, temporarily located at 1645 Tiffin Ave.

• Gearsource Music, 227 N. Main St.

• Heuerman U Haul Truck Rental, 120 N. Main St.

• J&S Archery, 1031 S. Blanchard St.

• Kagy Insurance Services, temporarily located at 111 E. Crawford St.

• Karl Kuhlman Body & Radiator Repair, 136 N. Main St.

• Niswander Jewelers, 331 S. Main St.

• O.J. Parts, 1815 Blanchard Ave.

• Papillon Boutique, 1016 Tiffin Ave.

• Automotive Electronic Service, 240 E. Front St.

• The Bike Shop of Findlay, 125 W. Sandusky St.

• Bindel's Appliance, 214 S. Main St.

• Bread Kneads, 510 S. Blanchard St.

• CIH Salon, 106 S. West St.

• Dietsch Brothers, 1217 Tiffin Ave.

• Diversified Woodworking & Supply, 310 E. Crawford St.

• Downtown Antiques & Lighting, 231 S. Main St.

• Elks Lodge, 601 S. Main St.

• Eyes On Main, 334 S. Main St.

• Findlay ACE Hardware, 200 S. Main St.

• Findlay Moose Family Center 698, 1028 W. Main Cross St.

• Flag City Auto Glass, 121 E. Crawford St.

• Fuzzy Burnstein's, 222 S. Main St.

• Gaslight Gifts, 408 S. Main St.

• House of Awards and Shoes, 209 S. Main St.

• Jack's Heating A/C Plumbing, 207 N. Main St.

• Longberry Paint 'N' Paper, 217 Broadway.

• Mad Hatter Promotions, relocated to 230 W. Sandusky St.

• Main Street News, 501 S. Main St.

• Martin's Academy of Tae Kwon Do, 1212 Blanchard Ave.

• Mother Hubbard's Learning Cupboard, 219 Broadway.

• Property Analysts, 507 S. Main St.

• Rossilli's Restaurant, 217 S. Main St.

• Sign of the Bell, 214 W. Front St.

• Snyder, Alge & Welch law firm, relocated to 101 W. Sandusky St., Suite 313.

• Sour Flower Trading Post, 204 N. Main St., limited services.

• Springs of Life, 112 S. Main St.

• Star Pawn Shop, 211 N. Main St.

• Trautman Interiors, 506 S. Main St.

• Wolfies, 340 Glessner Ave.

The Courier is asking businesses that have reopened after the flood to please e-mail the Courier's business reporter, Lou Wilin, at louwilin@thecourier.com; or e-mail news@thecourier.com; or drop off a note for Wilin at the Courier's newsroom. Tell us the name of your business, and your address. A complete list of reopenings is available at the Back In Business link on The Courier's Web site at www.thecourier.com.

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Flood debris collection centers to be removed after today

Flood debris collection centers in Findlay will be in place through the end of today. After that, residents will be responsible for disposing of their flood trash.

Containers for flood debris are located at the following locations:

• Cooper Park on Broad Avenue.

• Swale Park, off Defiance Avenue.

• Heuerman’s lot on North Main Street, front and rear.

• The northeast corner of the intersection of East Main Cross Street and South Blanchard Street.

• Koehler Field on South Blanchard Street.

• Emory Adams Park.

• Kiddie Corral on Center Street.

• Spring Lake -- Kennison Drive.

• Hunters Creek -- at the intersection of Fishlock Avenue and Kensington Drive.

• The intersection of East Hardin Street and Grand Avenue.

The recycling drop-off point for paint, tires and electronics will be in place until sometime next week. It is located across the street from the Findlay Public Works Department, 330 N. Cory St.

For more information, call Mayor Tony Iriti’s office at 419-424-7137.

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Bluffton looking to recoup some flood expenses

By ERIC SCHAADT

Staff Writer

BLUFFTON — Bluffton officials will sit down with federal representatives next week to start the process of recouping some of the village's expenses from last month's flood.

Public agencies, which have been declared eligible for federal aid, can seek funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

In Bluffton, the floodwaters caused an estimated $410,000 in damage to village property.

Of that, $215,000 will be sought to fix a bridge over Spring Street near Buckeye Park, according to Village Administrator Jamie Mehaffie.

Money also will be pursued for repairs to a building at the water treatment plant.

And two police cruisers must be replaced.

One cruiser, parked on high ground while a police officer was knocking on doors to warn people of rising waters last month, was subsequently consumed by the flood.

The village's aid request also will include cleanup expenses, the village administrator said Wednesday.

Bluffton is used to applying for FEMA money, having experienced an ice storm during January 2005.

In other flood-related matters, curbside pickup of waterlogged materials is winding down in Bluffton. People who still need storm debris hauled away can contact the village administrator's office.

"Everything is going really well," Mehaffie said of the cleanup effort, praising village employees for their work.

Thoughout the village, the flood did an estimated $8 million in damage.

Contact staff writer Eric Schaadt at:

(419) 427-8414

ericschaadt@thecourier.com

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Flood injuries, illnesses keep hospital busy

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

Blanchard Valley Hospital didn’t receive much damage in last month’s flood, but it did treat the damaged.

As of Wednesday, the hospital’s emergency rooms in Findlay and Bluffton had treated 128 people for flood-related illnesses or injuries, and 14 people were admitted.

Of that 128, 123 patients went to the Findlay emergency room and five were treated in Bluffton.

Most of the injuries were not directly from the flood, but from flood-related activities, said Barb Lockard, the hospital’s public relations and marketing director.

“The majority of the people we saw were injured either by helping someone else or cleaning up,” Lockard said.

Respiratory cases accounted for many emergency room visits, Lockard said. Cleaning flood-damaged areas with undiluted bleach caused some of those health problems. There were also gastrointestinal problems, rashes, abrasions and hypothermia, despite the August heat.

People suffered from flood-related mental health problems too, and sought help in the emergency room.

Here’s the official tally of flood-related illnesses and injuries treated by Blanchard Valley Hospital:

• 51 abrasions.

• Nine gastrointestinal illnesses.

• 15 rashes.

• 26 respiratory-related problems.

• Five fractures.

• Four cases of chest pain.

• Four cases of hypothermia.

• Four cases of mental illness-related problems.

• 26 miscellaneous flood-related illnesses or injuries.

Lockard said the numbers will be reviewed to identify possible trends in illnesses, which is standard procedure at the hospital.

Some of the illnesses may have been anticipated, like respiratory illnesses, and others, like hypothermia, may seem surprising.

It turns out, though, that water doesn’t have to be icy to lead to hypothermia. The human body loses heat more quickly in water than air, so water at any temperature lower than body temperature causes a person to lose at least some heat.

An accidental fall into cold water is especially likely to lead to hypothermia, according to information from the www.mayoclinic.com. Hypothermia may develop within minutes of being exposed to cold water, or it may take several hours, depending on the water temperature.

For those still cleaning, the bleach solutions require a very small amount of bleach for every gallon of water.

Contact Staff Writer Michelle Reiter at: (419) 427-8497 michellereiter@thecourier.com

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Tour of Homes to begin

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

Reflecting the slumping housing market, Findlay's annual fashion show of new homes will display more affordable models this weekend.

What in the past has been called the Parade of Homes is called the Tour of Homes this year because the six new homes being showcased are scattered around Findlay.

In the past, the new homes were concentrated in one or two neighborhoods.

The "Spectacular Tour of Homes" will be held from 5-8 p.m. on the next two Fridays, noon to 8 p.m. on the next two Saturdays, and noon to 5 p.m. on the next two Sundays.

It costs $2 per person, down from $5 per person in years past, but that's the least of the price reductions.

Homes in this year's show go for $175,000 to $474,000 — less than half the values of recent years.

That also makes them affordable for many more people, and because none of them are under contract, they all are for sale.

"We really have something for everybody," Tour of Homes Co-Chair Denise Halliday said.

The addresses and builders to be featured are:

• 191 Stanford Parkway, by Mid-State Homes.

• 1115 Lye Creek Drive, by Best Construction.

• 1119 Tarra Oaks Drive, by Best Construction.

• 8270 Clearbrook Circle, by Brookview Homes.

• 8279 Clearbrook Circle, by Couchot Homes.

• 14417 U.S. 68, by Tri-Point Homes.

Those taking the tour can buy their tickets and begin at any of the locations, however, home tour leaders prefer people start at the Mid-State Homes site at 191 Stanford Parkway.

In addition, two developers will be sponsoring "welcome sites" over the next two weekends at their subdivisions.

The welcome sites will offer guided tours of the new subdivisions, information about lots and financing.

Welcome sites will be at:

• Petti Construction's Deer Landing subdivision, on Williams Street, from noon to 5 p.m. on the next two Saturdays and Sundays.

• GlenMar subdivision, located on County Road 140, north of County Road 95 and south of County Road 99. It will be staffed from 5-8 p.m. on the next two Fridays and from noon to 5 p.m. on the next two Saturdays and Sundays. The subdivision is being developed by PAS II and Phil and Sue Stover.

Contact staff writer Lou Wilin at:

(419) 427-8413

louwilin@thecourier.com

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Housing construction slows down

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

The pace of housing construction has slowed down in the Findlay area.

In the city of Findlay and Marion and Liberty townships, 77 permits were issued through mid-August of this year. That was down from 120 last year.

Business in mid-August was down about 25 percent from last year for Roger and John Best, who own Best Construction.

Typically in late August, they have four or five contracts in hand to build houses.

This year in later August they had none, Roger Best said.

All builders had a slump in the latter part of 2006 and early 2007, said Hancock County Home Builders Association President Barry Simmons.

In Liberty Township, the number of "buildable" lots — those in platted subdivisions and having water and sewer available — has nearly doubled, reaching almost 100 this year, Zoning Inspector Tom Brown said.

So many lots, yet so little construction: Liberty had granted 17 permits to build homes through Monday.

Last year at this time it had granted 16 permits with less than 50 lots available, Brown said.

Best attributes the soft market to fear and nervousness among people over news reports of negative economic signs.

He also notices that his phone seems to stop ringing when the price of gasoline rises.

But both Simmons and Best said the worst is over.

"I think we've hit bottom, we're starting to come out of it," Best said. "I'm expecting a good fall."

Contact staff writer Lou Wilin at:

(419) 427-8413

louwilin@thecourier.com

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New judge to be appointed for Richey retrial

OTTAWA (AP) — A judge who prosecuted a U.S.-British citizen in a death penalty case 20 years ago has stepped aside from taking part in the man's retrial.

Judge Randall Basinger has asked the Ohio Supreme Court Chief to appoint another judge to handle the case against Kenneth Richey.

Richey, 43, was convicted of starting an apartment fire in 1986 that killed a 2-year-old girl in Columbus Grove in northwest Ohio. He was sentenced to die, but an appeals court threw out his conviction and death sentence.

Prosecutors plan to try Richey again on aggravated murder, aggravated arson and child endangering charges.

Basinger was the prosecutor at Richey's original trial and later was elected Putnam County's only common pleas judge.

His decision to recuse himself had been expected.

Richey spent years fighting his conviction until a federal appeals court threw out his death sentence, saying he received ineffective counsel in his trial.

Richey grew up in Scotland and has drawn support from members of the British Parliament and the late Pope John Paul II.

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Commissioner accused of shoplifting

TIFFIN — The newest Seneca County commissioner has been charged with misdemeanor theft for allegedly stealing three packs of Rolaids from a Tiffin grocery store.

Mike Bridinger, who began serving a four-year term on the board in January, is alleged to have shoplifted the items from Heritage IGA, 479 E. Market St.,

According to complaint filed in Tiffin Municipal Court, Bridinger is seen on store surveillance cameras picking up a package of Rolaids and placing them into his pants pocket on three separate occasions — Sept. 8, Sept. 7 and Sept. 1.

Bridinger, who admitted it was him taking the items in the surveillance video, paid for items in his basket, but failed to pay for the Rolaids, according to the police complaint.

Bridinger declined to comment, referring all questions to his attorney, Dean Henry, of Tiffin.

"He voluntarily appeared at the police station," Henry said, adding it was inconclusive from the report he received if Bridinger was actually arrested.

According to Tiffin Police Chief Dave LaGrange, Bridinger was charged, went through the booking process and was released on his own recognizance, which is common in misdemeanor cases.

Henry added he hasn't seen any of the evidence, but expects discovery evidence from the city prosecutor's office in two or three weeks.

The alleged violation is a first-degree misdemeanor punishable by a maximum sentence of six months in prison and a fine of $1,000. Bridinger is scheduled to appear in Tiffin Municipal Court at 9 a.m. on Sept. 19.

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Public Record

Docket

The following incidents were reported to the Findlay Police Department and the Hancock County Sheriff's Office:

Police Department

A Findlay couple said Monday that their son had forged several of their bank withdrawal slips, totaling $2,600.

Jewelry was reported missing Tuesday from 720 Fishlock Ave.

An Oakdale Drive man was incarcerated for domestic violence after threatening to shoot two family members Tuesday.

A hit-skip motorist in a Dodge Neon bumped into a bicyclist, knocking him down on West Foulke Avenue on Wednesday.

Domestic discord occurred at a Dayton Drive dwelling Wednesday.

An intoxicated man — passed out on a lawn at 235 Laquineo St. after imbibing Mad Dog 20/20 — was arrested for disorderly conduct Wednesday.

Sheriff's Office

A Fostoria man was ticketed Saturday for failing to control his Mercury Topaz after he was unable to negotiate a curve on Ohio 613, west of Cass Township Road 236, and went into a bean field, rolling once.

A rural Findlay girl, age 17, was facing a count of underage consumption of alcohol after she drank at a Findlay address on Sept. 3. An allegation of contributing to the unruliness of this female was being sought against a rural Findlay male.

Domestic violence charges were considered Monday after two Pinewood Drive brothers were involved in a fracas.

Anyone with information about a crime can call Findlay/Hancock County Crimestoppers

between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays at (419) 425-TIPS, or visit the Web at www.

HancockCrimeStoppers.org.

Callers may remain anonymous.

Municipal Court

The following persons were sentenced in Findlay Municipal Court:

Dustan R. Thompson, Bluffton, driving under suspension (DUS); $250 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended.

Robert O. Anspach Jr., 427 W. Lincoln St., reckless operation of a vehicle; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 18 suspended.

Brent D. Davis, 1613 Crystal Ave., operating a vehicle while under the influence (OVI); $300 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended.

Johnny J. Walker, Benton Ridge, violating protection order; $250 fine, 60 jail days with 53 suspended.

Richard L. Businger, 232 Edith Ave., telephone harassment; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended.

Anne E. Ricketts, 15470 Lakeview Parkway, speed; $105 fine.

Warnie W. Davis, Findlay, no operator's license (NOL); $250 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended.

Kathie L. Snyder, 12811 Township Road 108, NOL; $50 fine.

Andrew S. Bowen, 1420 Timberwood Drive, DUS; $250 fine, 30 jail days suspended.

Jamie L. Deal, 1202 S. Blanchard St., DUS; $150 fine, 30 jail days with 27 suspended.

Barry A. Hilty, 1809 Fostoria Ave., OVI; $500 fine, 180 jail days, license suspended 731 days.

Tristan A. Jackson, 2801 S. Main St., 5, DUS; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 27 suspended.

Daniel Gordon Lawless, 343 E. Sandusky St., DUS; $250 fine, 60 jail days with 30 suspended.

Tara J. Nye, Carey, OVI; $300 fine, 30 jail days with 20 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Gary A. Powers, rural Fostoria, failure to stop after an accident; $100 fine, license suspended 181 days.

Michelle R. Skapura, 201 Lime St., physical control of a vehicle violation; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 23 suspended.

Patricia B. Worstell, 1121 Fox Run Road, speed; $105 fine.

Caleb B. Baas, rural Alvada, DUS; $150 fine, 30 jail days with 27 suspended.

Terry N. Bosserman, 16050 Beechwood Drive, reckless operation of a vehicle; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 23 suspended.

Barry A. Hilty, 1809 Fostoria Ave., OVI; $500 fine, 180 jail days, license suspended 731 days.

Paige L. Jansen, 1000 N. Main St., OVI; $300 fine, 30 jail days with 23 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Jason L. Leeper, 222 Baldwin Ave., DUS; $250 fine, 60 jail days.

Patrick E. Maag, Columbus Grove, speed; $250 fine.

Brian C. Rupe, 512 Stadium Drive, OVI, failure to display proper plates; $350 fine, 60 jail days with 46 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Courthouse

Common Pleas Court

The following activity took place in Hancock County Common Pleas Court:

David W. Eblin, 19, of Ottawa, and Richard A. Hudson, 18, of Findlay, were both convicted of first-degree felony burglary and robbery charges, and second-degree felony robbery charges by Judge Joseph Niemeyer. Both cases were continued for sentencing on Nov. 15. Eblin and Hudson were among four men indicted in connection with an incident on June 3 when a West Lincoln Street home was burglarized. A man who lived at the residence was tied up and robbed. The suspects were arrested the same day after being found in the area by police. Eblin was also convicted of a third-degree felony robbery charge stemming from a May 29 incident in Findlay.

Steven C. Santos, 37, of Arcadia, was convicted of trafficking in cocaine, a fifth-degree felony, by Judge Reg Routson, who scheduled sentencing for Oct. 17. Santos was indicted for selling less than five grams of cocaine in Findlay on May 13, 2005.

Dallas M. Gavan, 22, of Findlay, was sentenced to 17 months in prison by Judge Routson on three trafficking in drugs convictions. He was also ordered to serve a previously suspended 16-month prison term on a 2003 vandalism conviction. The drug charges were filed earlier this year for drug transactions involving marijuana, Ecstasy, and cocaine in March 2006 in Findlay. The vandalism indictment resulted after Gavan damaged a Pepsi machine in 2003.

Logan J. Munson, 26, of Fostoria, was ordered to serve a previously suspended 16-month prison term by Judge Routson after failing to complete his community control sanctions (CCS). Munson had been placed on CCS for five years last September on a fourth-degree felony failure to appear conviction, and for a first-degree misdemeanor receiving stolen property conviction. Munson had been indicted in 2004 for being in possession of 10 archery bows that had been stolen from a Fostoria man. He was indicted again in 2005 when he failed to show up for a hearing in the earlier case. The prison term was ordered when it was learned the defendant had failed to report to his probation officer, admitted to using illegal drugs, and moved without notifying his probation officer.

Joey C. Sterling, 49, of Findlay, was placed on CCS for five years after being granted an early release from prison by Judge Routson. The defendant had been sentenced to two years in prison in July after being convicted of engaging in a pattern of corrupt activity, a second-degree felony; and two counts of trafficking in cocaine, one a fourth-degree felony and the other a fifth-degree felony. The charges stemmed from a cocaine drug ring that had been operating in Hancock County since 2004 and was broken up last year. As part of his role in the drug ring, Sterling sold cocaine on two occasions in Findlay in December 2005.

The following people entered innocent pleas during arraignment hearings in Hancock County Common Pleas Court:

Michael G. Ochoa, 21, of Orient, aggravated burglary (first-degree felony); $30,000 bond established, Sept. 21 pretrial hearing scheduled.

Ricky E. Deal, 36, of McComb, identity fraud (fifth-degree felony); $3,750 bond set, Sept. 17 pretrial hearing.

Real Estate Transfers

Todd J. and Leslie A. Smith to Lindsay Bosserman, Lot 44, Continuation of East Findlay Addition, Findlay.

Douglas E. and Sheryl A. Couch to Gang Guo and Yuli Xie, Lot 6, Tawa Ridge Estates 1st Addition, Blanchard Township.

Theodore M. Black to Todd J. and Leslie A. Smith, Lot 3, Brookside 4th Addition, Findlay.

Ann M. Buis Trust, Ann M. and Thomas A. Buis to Elliott B. II and Pamela S. Young, Section 8, 9.043 acres, Washington Township.

Alvenia M. Riter to A. Jerry Riter and A. Jerry and Joanne Riter Trust, Unit 19, Brand Hill Condo, Findlay.

Ricky D. and Renae J. Andonian to Walt H. III and Lynnette L. Sheppard, Section 16, 3 acres, Jackson Township.

Hancock County sheriff, Duane A. and Janet S. Hartman Vaughan to Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp., Section 34, 2 acres, Eagle Township.

Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. to Andrew J. Yates, Section 34, 2 acres, Eagle Township.

Fire Calls

Wednesday

7 a.m., 20 La Plas Drive, EMS call.

2:36 p.m., 15031 U.S. 224, flammable gas or liquid.

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