Monday, September 10th, 2007


FEMA to close 2 centers
FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) in Bluffton and Carey will be open for one more week, then will close at 6 p.m. Saturday.
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Jazz artist plans visit to say thanks
New Orleans and Findlay are beginning to have a little bit in common. Both cities are still feeling the impact of the worst floods in their histories, for example, and then there's Chucky C.
more >>
Chucky C's concert schedule
Chucky C and Clearly Blue will be performing in Northwest Ohio from Sept. 16-23, accepting donations for the Katrina Relief Fund and the Ohio Flood Aid '07 fund.
more >>
Flood-related deductions available to some victims
Businesses which had property damage in the flood can take deductions on their income and property taxes.
more >>
FEMA offering tips at local stores
The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is stationing teams at three Findlay building supply stores, to provide flood mitigation information and guidance to local residents.
more >>
USDA offers flood repair program
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development has several programs available to assist homeowners with repairs due to the recent flooding.
more >>
Sheppard headlines Wyandot County Fair
UPPER SANDUSKY — This year's Wyandot County Fair, set to take place at the Wyandot County Fairgrounds in Upper Sandusky beginning Tuesday, will feature performances from a country singer who opened for the Beach Boys in the 1960s, two sisters raised on big band and 50s classics, and a youth variety group whose show spans genres from Motown to Broadway.
more >>
Public Record
Docket
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Local News

FEMA to close 2 centers

FEMA's Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs) in Bluffton and Carey will be open for one more week, then will close at 6 p.m. Saturday.

FEMA said it will be closing the two centers because of a reduced level of activity there.

"It's important for people to know that even though these sites are closing, the first step to register for assistance is still the same," Jesse Munoz of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) said in a written statement on Saturday. "We urge anyone who's been impacted by the storms and floods to register right away."

Those who want to register for assistance can call FEMA toll-free at 1-800-621-FEMA, or TTY 1-800-462-7585 for the speech- or hearing-impaired. Phone lines are open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day.

Registration also can be done online at www.fema.gov.

"The reduced level of activity at the centers means we are moving forward in the recovery process," said State Coordinating Officer Nancy Dragani of the Ohio Emergency Management Agency. "Now we're starting to focus more attention on long-term recovery needs."

While the FEMA recovery centers in Bluffton and Carey will be closing, the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) plans to establish Disaster Loan Outreach Centers in both villages at locations to be announced next week.

At these outreach centers, SBA customer service representatives will continue to assist homeowners and businesses in filling out long-term, low-interest loan applications.

More than 1,400 Ohioans have visited a DRC since they first opened in six northwest Ohio counties on Aug. 31, four days after the president issued a disaster declaration. Two more centers were opened after Hardin and Seneca counties were added to the original declaration on Sept. 4.

After the centers close in Allen and Wyandot counties, four DRCs will remain open in Northwest Ohio:

In Findlay at the Cube recreation center, 3430 N. Main St.

In Ottawa at the Putnam County Educational Services Center, 124 Putnam Parkway.

In Crawford County at the Crawford County Commissioners' Office, (law library, lower level), 112 E. Mansfield St., Bucyrus.

In Richland County at the Shelby YMCA, 111 W. Smiley Ave., Shelby.

They are open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday.

In addition, two DRCs will be open this week in Forest and Tiffin, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. for three days only, Monday through Wednesday.

The Forest DRC, serving Hardin County, will be at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 1182, 204 E. Lima, Forest.

The Tiffin DRC, serving Seneca County, will be at the Seneca County Public Safety Building, 126 Hopewell Ave., Tiffin (at the county fairgrounds).

The temporary DRCs were established to provide detailed program information to those who have already registered for assistance. In addition to representatives from federal, state and volunteer agencies, disaster recovery specialists staff the centers to answer questions and provide information on recovery, restoration and rebuilding.

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Jazz artist plans visit to say thanks

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

New Orleans and Findlay are beginning to have a little bit in common. Both cities are still feeling the impact of the worst floods in their histories, for example, and then there's Chucky C.

Chucky C, a well-known New Orleans jazz musician, is planning a visit to the Findlay area with his band Clearly Blue to put on some of the first concerts he's performed since he lost his New Orleans house in 2005 in the post-Hurricane Katrina flooding. He will come here this Saturday and stay through Sept. 23.

He's taken a special interest in the flooding that struck Hancock County and Findlay last month, said his friends, Rob and Dorothy Brown of Arlington.

"Chucky called Rob this morning after watching the national news," Dorothy Brown wrote The Courier the day after Findlay flooded and two days after flash floods in the county. "(He) wanted to know how the people from Findlay and Arlington were doing. His final comment was 'Let everyone know the New Orleans Sheetrockers are on their way.'"

Chucky C knows a thing or two about being displaced by flooding, said the Browns. They met him in New Orleans in May when they were volunteering their time and skills to rebuild homes with a group they started called the "Ohio Sheetrockers."

"We worked on his duplex," Rob said. "He lost his house in the lower 9th Ward."

Chucky had purchased the duplex before the flood and had planned to fix it up, as part of an overall gentrification project in the neighborhood.

But then the flood destroyed his house and nixed the project. Despite his prominence in New Orleans, Chucky C isn't wealthy and did not have the means to rebuild on his own.

That's the case for a lot of New Orleans residents, the Browns said, which is why they, along with a group of friends, have made regular trips to New Orleans to help clean out and rebuild homes that are still standing empty since the 2005 flood.

Many people, they said, are still living in Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) trailers on lawns in front of their flood-destroyed homes.

Rob became interested in the plight of Gulf Coast residents right after Hurricane Katrina hit. He went down to help as a Red Cross volunteer, and had such a meaningful stay that he decided to go back on his own. He rallied his friends and family to join him, and has gone back to the area several times since.

Rob works at Tuttle Construction in Lima, and was specifically interested in getting other local tradesmen to help with some of the rebuilding in New Orleans that was taking such a long time to complete.

About 33 people have made the trips with the Browns to help rebuild the area, and have seen in person how badly off people there still are.

"A lot of the houses haven't been touched since the flood," Rob said.

That meant that much of the work in the area involved "gutting" empty homes, including removing water-damaged contents.

Food that had been in the refrigerator in 2005 was still there. Family possessions were still there. And the mold and mildew had been allowed to grow freely.

"It was disgusting," Rob said. "As disgusting as it could possibly be."

And if Findlay smelled bad after it flooded, imagine how it would smell if it hadn't been cleaned up for two years.

"The smell was something you couldn't imagine," said Dana Helfrich, of Arlington, who has volunteered with the Browns' group.

People who lived there were grateful for the help — very grateful.

One woman had been living in a trailer outside of her house since the flood when the Browns and their crew moved in and drywalled the home's interior in one long day.

"The lady had spent a year and a half in a FEMA trailer," Rob said. "When we got the thing done, the lady was almost in tears. She could hardly talk."

That was the general mood in New Orleans when the Browns and their crew met Chucky C too.

Chucky C himself had briefly relocated in Dallas, His wife died shortly after the flood, and his depression was so intense that he did not want to play music.

When the Browns first tackled his duplex, Chucky C was there, but aloof. He sat on his porch with a neighbor and watched the volunteer crew from a distance.

"By the third day, he really liked us," Rob said. "He really hit it off with my son and his fiance."

After the Browns returned to Ohio, they called Chucky C to see how he was doing.

"He said, 'I can't believe you're calling me,'" Rob said. Rob did more than that — he invited Chucky C and Clearly Blue to Ohio to perform, and Chucky C not only agreed, but said he would do it for free.

Rob insisted on paying Chucky C, however, and said if he could figure out how much it would cost him to come to Ohio, the volunteer crew in Ohio would find a way to pay for his trip.

It would be an important trip, after all, as Chucky C hadn't touched his saxophone in over a year. Rob said.

"He said he sat down and cried after we left," Rob said. "He's still struggling, but he's getting better."

And assistance from the group of Ohioans helped.

"He was touched that people who didn't know him cared enough to do something for him," Helfrich said.

Chucky C has every intention of returning the favor. He will play at several locations around the area, including the Findlay Riverside Park bandshell. He also plans to perform with the Arlington High School band at the high school football game Sept. 21.

Donations will be accepted at performances for the Katrina Relief Fund and for the Ohio Flood Aid '07.

It's Chucky's chance to give back, Rob said. It's part of a generous spirit that has helped endear him to the Ohio Sheetrockers.

"This is somebody who doesn't know where his next meal is coming from," he said. "And he wants to help others."

For more information, contact the Ohio Sheetrockers at OhioSheetrockers@verizon.net.

Contact Staff Writer Michelle Reiter at:

(419) 427-8497

michellereiter@thecourier.com

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Chucky C's concert schedule

Chucky C and Clearly Blue will be performing in Northwest Ohio from Sept. 16-23, accepting donations for the Katrina Relief Fund and the Ohio Flood Aid '07 fund.

For those interested in attending, Chucky C and Clearly Blue's concert and rally dates are as follows:

Sept. 16, 6:30 p.m., Concert, Findlay First Presbyterian Church.

Sept. 17, 7 p.m., Concert, University of Findlay, Cory Street Mall.

Sept. 18, 6:30 p.m., Concert, Ottawa Water Works Park.

Sept. 19, 8 p.m., Concert, Ohio Northern University Chapel.

Sept. 20, 6 p.m., Rally in the Square in downtown Lima.

Sept. 21, 7:30p.m., Chucky C will perform with the Arlington High School Band at the school's football game.

Sept. 22, 6:30 p.m., Concert at the Findlay Riverside Park Bandshell.

Sept. 23, 9 a.m., Church Service at Arlington United Methodist Church, and an 11 a.m. farewell luncheon at the church.

For more information, e-mail the Ohio Sheetwalkers at: OhioSheetrockers@verizon.net

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Flood-related deductions available to some victims

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

Businesses which had property damage in the flood can take deductions on their income and property taxes.

Many businesses will be able to take income tax deductions, said Flint Heidlebaugh of Heidlebaugh & Associates, certified public accountants.

But few households will be able to claim income tax deductions for personal losses, such as to a home and its contents, Heidlebaugh said.

A property tax reduction, however, is available to businesses and homeowners alike.

In the case of the income tax deduction for businesses, the amount of the loss which can be deducted must be reduced by any insurance proceeds from the loss, Heidlebaugh said.

For example, say a firm has a piece of equipment which lost $3,000 in value in the flood, and an insurance company paid $500 toward the loss.

The firm's income tax deduction would be $2,500: The $3,000 loss minus the $500 from the insurance company.

IRS Form 4684 is needed to make a deduction for flood damages. IRS Publication 2194B, "Disaster Losses Kit for Businesses" explains how to make the deduction.

Businesses and homeowners can get a reduction on local property taxes by filling out DTE Form 26, which is available at the Hancock County Auditor's Office.

Links to the publication and all forms can be found at the Courier's Web site at www.thecourier.com.

The assessed value of the damaged portion of a property can be reduced by up to 50 percent, County Auditor Charity Rauschenberg said.

Rauschenberg encourages people to apply for the reduction soon.

That would allow the tax reduction to be applied when the first-half real property tax bills are mailed in January.

Those who wait until near the Dec. 31 deadline to apply might not see the benefit until the second-half real property tax bills are mailed next June.

For more information, call the county auditor's office at 419-424-7015.



Households

While households with a flood-damaged home can get the reduction on their local property tax, few will be able to claim the income tax deduction, Heidlebaugh said.

A household trying to make an income tax deduction for personal losses would have to subtract $100 from the claim as well as any grants from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and then compare the result with its adjusted gross income.

The household could only deduct the portion of the loss figure which exceeds 10 percent of its adjusted gross income.

For example, say a home lost $3,000 value in the flood, and an insurance company paid $500 toward the loss. The household would have to further reduce its claim by $100. The result: $2,400.

That figure would be further reduced by any FEMA grants received, and the household would still have more calculating to do.

It would have to calculate its adjusted gross income — generally earnings from jobs, self-employment or any investment or rental income.

Say its adjusted gross income is $46,100, roughly the median household income in Hancock County. Ten percent of that figure is $4,610.

Because $4,610 exceeds the $2,400 in claimed losses, the household would get no income tax deduction.

Contact staff writer Lou Wilin at:

(419) 427-8413

louwilin@thecourier.com

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FEMA offering tips at local stores

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is stationing teams at three Findlay building supply stores, to provide flood mitigation information and guidance to local residents.

A FEMA team will be at Home Depot, 1981 Tiffin Ave., from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Wednesday.

A team also will be at Home Depot from Sept. 20 to Sept. 26, and Oct. 4 to Oct. 10.

Another team will be at Menards, 15110 Flag City Drive, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday.

A FEMA team will be at Lowe's, 1077 Bright Road, from Thursday through Wednesday, Sept. 19, and from Sept. 27 through Oct. 3. Hours will be 7 a.m. to 6 p.m., and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

The FEMA teams will explain techniques that can lessen flood damage to homes, businesses and properties. They will also offer flood safety tips to prevent health problems that may be caused by mold and mildew.

The teams also will provide "how-to" information for retrofitting buildings. This can include relocating main electric switchboxes and outlets; moving washers and dryers to higher floors; elevating furnaces and water heaters; and using licensed plumbers to install special valves to prevent sewer backups.

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USDA offers flood repair program

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development has several programs available to assist homeowners with repairs due to the recent flooding.

The funds can be used for items such as installation of new heating systems, siding replacement, providing sanitary water and waste water disposal systems, installing insulation, remodeling and a variety of other repairs.

The first program provides loan funds to very-low income residents in Ottawa, Arlington, Jenera, Bluffton, Carey, Upper Sandusky, Bettsville and Sycamore who need additional money above their insurance proceeds.

The agency offers loans at a 1 percent interest rate (up to $20,000 with 20 years repayment period) for repairs to improve or modernize a home, make it safer or more sanitary, or remove health hazards.

Repairs to homes under the loan program can include replacing worn carpet, vinyl siding and other remodeling-type improvements.

The loans are limited to households with income below 50 percent of the area's median income.

In Hancock County, that figure is $30,150 for a family of four; Putnam County, $30,750; Seneca County, $25.900; and Wyandot County, $26,550. Income guidelines are available at the USDA Rural Development Web site: http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rhs/common/indiv_intro.htm

Meanwhile, USDA Rural Development grants may be available for applicants who are at least 62 years old, considered very-low income and don't have ability to repay a loan.

Grant funds can only be used to remove health or safety hazards or to remodel dwellings to make them accessible to household members with disabilities. Grants have a lifetime limit of $7,500.

These grants are sometimes combined with loans to increase the amount available for repairs.

To be eligible for assistance through these programs, applicants must meet income limits, be unable to obtain the requested assistance through other sources, have adequate repayment ability in situations involving a loan request, have an acceptable credit history and have the legal capacity to incur the obligation.

For additional information, or an application, contact the USDA Rural Development Findlay area office, (419) 422-0242, ext. 113, or e-mail Karen.Westrick@oh.usda.gov

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Sheppard headlines Wyandot County Fair

UPPER SANDUSKY — This year's Wyandot County Fair, set to take place at the Wyandot County Fairgrounds in Upper Sandusky beginning Tuesday, will feature performances from a country singer who opened for the Beach Boys in the 1960s, two sisters raised on big band and 50s classics, and a youth variety group whose show spans genres from Motown to Broadway.

T.G. Sheppard, who made his first appearance on the pop charts in 1966 and later had hits such as "Devil in the Bottle" and "Trying to Beat the Morning Home," will perform at the fair on Sunday at 3 p.m. at the arena. An extra admission price will be charged for the show.

Sisters Linda Donaldson and Ruth Folk will bring their two-part harmonies to the pavilion at 11 a.m. on Thursday.

On Saturday, Ohio's Youth Entertainers, comprised of multi-talented youths from central Ohio ages 7-19 will perform a three-hour block of songs, dances, skits, comedy and magic beginning at 7:30 p.m. The show will be hosted by emcee Christina Barth.

Other events for the week include an appearance by Bob Heft, designer of the 50-star version of the American flag, as grand marshal of the Wyandot County Fair parade at 6:15 p.m. on Tuesday; and the Wyandot County Fair's third-annual basket fund-raiser, with the limited edition, "American Hero"-themed hand baskets going on sale at the fair's secretary's office on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m.

General admission to the fair is $5. The fair schedule is as follows:

Tuesday

8 a.m. — Opening of 156th Wyandot County Fair

8:30 a.m. — Junior horse and pony judging — Horse arena

9 a.m. — Open culinary judging — Culinary building

9 a.m. — Open grain and vegetable judging — Culinary building

4 p.m. — Baked goods auction — Pavilion

5:30 p.m. — Junior Fair King and Queen pageant

6:15 p.m. — Parade — Grandstand

6:30 p.m. — Registered horseshoe pitching classes

7 p.m. — County High School Band Show — Grandstand

7 p.m. — Jimmy's Jukebox and Karaoke — Pavilion

9 a.m. — Junior booth judging — Booth building

9 a.m. — Junior and open dairy goats — Arena

9 a.m. — Junior and Open dairy show — Arena

4-8 p.m. — Birds of prey — Conservation building grandstand



Wednesday

8 a.m. — Junior market hog judging and showmanship — Arena

9 a.m. — Junior swine production contest — Arena

----7 p.m. — Wyandot squares — Pavilion

Open horse and pony Judging — Horse arena

9 a.m. — Junior and open breeding sheep Judging — Arena; Junior and Open market lamb show immediately following

9:30 a.m. — Open flower judging — Culinary building

4-8 p.m. — Birds of prey — conservation building

Parimutuel harness racing (Super stakes) — Grandstand

6:30 p.m. — Registered horseshoe pitching classes



Thursday

All day — Senior citizens activities — Pavilion

10 a.m. — Junior Dairy beef feeders — Arena; Jane E. Horton — Pavilion

11 a.m. — The Sisters — Pavilion; Health day at fair — Pavilion

Noon — Junior Beef breeding — Arena

12:30 p.m. — Open beef judging — Arena

1 p.m. — Open horseshoe doubles — Senior; Senior Citizens' awards — Pavilion; Draft Horse Show

1:30 p.m. — White Lilly Chapel Gospel Singers — Pavilion

2:30 p.m. — Darryl and Allie Gatlin — Pavilion

5 p.m. — Venison chili — Conservation Building; Junior Beef feeder calf show and Junior Beef show — Arena; Sparkle the Clown and Outback Jack on Grounds Pavilion

2-6 p.m. — Birds of prey — Conservation Building

6 p.m. — Parimutuel harness racing (Super stakes) — Grandstand

6:30 p.m. — Registered horseshoe pitching classes

7 p.m. — Dart ball tourney — Pavilion



Friday

8:30 a.m. — Junior Rabbit judging — Arena; Junior and Open poultry show — Arena

3 p.m. — Junior Fair Showman of Showmen — Arena; National Kiddie Tractor Pullers' Association — Pavilion

4-8 p.m. — Birds of prey — Conservation Building

5 p.m. — Fun with Farm Bureau — Arena

7 p.m. — Reid Barth Quartet — Pavilion; Broken Horn Rodeo — Grandstand — admission charge

Sparkle the Clown and Outback Jack on Grounds



Saturday

9 a.m. — 2007 Junior Fair livestock sale — Arena; Open class rabbit show; Antique and garden tractor pull — Grandstand; Fun show — Junior horse arena

9 a.m.-noon — Anne Stratton antique appraisals — Pavilion

10 a.m. — Regular horseshoe pitching classes (also 1 p.m. and 4 p.m.); Birds of prey — Conservation building (Eagle)

11:30 a.m. — Venison stew — Conservation building

1 p.m. — Back Roads Band — Pavilion Grandstands — Admission charge; Rena, Sparkle the clown and Outback Jack on Grounds

3 p.m. — Star Kids — Pavilion

4:30 p.m. — Marion Stepping Seniors — Pavilion

6:30 p.m. — Tractor pull — Grandstand — Admission charge

7:30-10:30 p.m. — Christina Barth and Ohio's Youth Entertainers' Stage Show — Pavilion



Sunday

10:30 a.m. — Mass — Arena

11 a.m. — Demolition derby — Grandstand — admission charge

Noon — Concessions and exhibits open

1 p.m. — Open horseshoe doubles

1:30 p.m. — 4-H Cloverbud graduation — Pavilion

2:30 p.m. — Mohawk show choir — Pavilion

3 p.m. — T.G. Sheppard — Arena; Gospel concert — Pavilion

6 p.m. — Tough truck contest — Grandstands — Admission charge

9 p.m. — Closing of the 156th Wyandot County Fair.

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Public Record

Docket

The following incidents were reported to the Findlay Police Department and the Hancock County Sheriff's Office:

Police Department

Several CDs, coins, a debit card, a stereo, cell phone equipment and medication were taken Friday from cars at 1023 W. Main Cross, 531 Putnam and 227 W. Lincoln streets.

A strip of paneling was pulled Friday from a Toyota Scion at 303 Frazer St., Apt. B.

A fuel injector line was cut on a vehicle Friday outside 7855 County Road 140.

A window was broken on a door at 105 S. Cory St. and a shed door was kicked in Friday.

A man shoplifted clothes from Elder-Beerman, 1800 Tiffin Ave.

A woman was facing a theft of services charge after placing trash without permission in a dumpster outside 1301 W. Sandusky St. on Friday.

Two change machines were yanked from a wall at A to Z Car Wash, 1100 W. Main Cross St., on Friday.

A driver who struck a stop sign Friday on East Melrose Avenue was caught later in Arcadia.

A license plate was taken from a truck outside 903 Interstate Drive on Friday.

Nintendo game equipment and a camera were swiped Friday from 327 Walnut St.

An impaired motorist was charged Friday with drunken driving after speeding on Hull Avenue.

A Findlay driver was taken into custody for fleeing and eluding after leading police on an early Saturday morning pursuit with speeds that topped 80 mph on North Blanchard Street and Tiffin Avenue. He jumped from a moving car before running from the area.

A woman, age 20, was arrested for underage consumption of alcohol Saturday outside 707 N. Cory St.

A woman said Saturday that she had been sexually assaulted by a male in his apartment.

A gray metal fixture was broken Saturday outside Waldo Pepper's, 411 S. Main St.

A man was in trouble Saturday for using an aluminum baseball bat to break the window of a Pontiac parked in the 400 block of Eben Avenue.

A man was charged with shoplifting Angus steak in his cargo pants at Kroger, 101 Sixth St., on Saturday.

A female was being sought Saturday for punching another person at 824 Morse St.

An assault charge was requested against a city man being treated in the emergency room of Blanchard Valley Hospital where he struggled with a security staffer who was attempting to restrain him Saturday.

Medication was reported missing Sunday from 111 E. Sandusky St., Apt. B.

A female said that her cell phone, which she had placed in the cleavage of her chest, had slipped from her shirt while she was dancing at Wooley Bulley's, 1851 Tiffin Ave., on Sunday.

A man, wanted under two city warrants, was cited for falsification after police were summoned to a Sunday altercation at 440 Howard St.

A man was given a trespass warning following a Sunday fracas at 425 Monroe Ave., Lot 48.

Sheriff's Office

A stereo, small TV and VCR were stolen after three vehicles were entered while being stored at Boyd's Garage, 410 E. Bigelow Ave. The theft was reported Wednesday.

A homeless man, currently being held in jail under a warrant, was facing petty theft allegations Wednesday while authorities investigated a previous report that he had stolen tools and other materials from his parents for money to support his cocaine addiction.

Domestic disputes occurred last weekend inside residences on Ohio 12, Delaware Township Road 181 and West Heatherview Court.

A bicycle was taken Friday from 8139 Oakwood Drive.

Medications were missing from 1944 Cottonwood St. last July 30.

Two people were involved in a fight Wednesday at a North Main Street location in Arlington.

Three padlocks were missing from a Pepsi machine outside 102 S. Main St., Mount Cory, on Aug. 31.

A Maplewood Drive couple was involved in a Sept. 3 fracas.

A man driving a tan auto allegedly illegally passed a Cory-Rawson school bus Friday on South Main Street in Mount Cory.

A driveway at 427 Nebraska Ave. was egged Saturday.

Anyone with information about a crime can call Findlay/Hancock County Crimestoppers

between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays at (419) 425-TIPS, or visit the Web at www.

HancockCrimeStoppers.org.

Callers may remain anonymous.

Fire Calls

Saturday

12:58 a.m., 425 Monroe Ave., medical assist.

4:44 a.m., 240 Highland Drive, EMS call.

5:15 a.m., 537 Winterhaven Drive, medical assist.

10:08 a.m., 15080 Flag City Drive, alarm malfunction.

2:28 p.m., 827 Meadow Brook Road, good intent call.

2:45 p.m., 1901 S. Main St., unintentional alarm.

5:29 p.m., 339 E. Melrose Ave., EMS call.

9:29 p.m., 1800 Tiffin Ave., alarm system malfunction.

10:04 p.m., 132 Covington Ave., EMS call.

11:13 p.m., 1323 Glen Haven Drive, public service.

Sunday

12:38 a.m., 221 Crystal Ave., EMS call.

1:56 a.m., 1494 Fleetwood Ave., EMS call.

12:43 p.m., 750 Bright Rd., EMS call.

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