Thursday, September 6th, 2007


Central students to move
Most Findlay city schools will open on Monday, but not flood-damaged Central Middle School.
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Library's reopening date still uncertain
Findlay-Hancock County Public Library officials said Wednesday they don’t yet know when the flood-ravaged facility on Broadway will reopen, but beginning Monday they’ll be using the undamaged Arlington branch and the Bookmobile to initially re-establish Internet and book borrowing services.
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Ohio Congressman Paul Gillmor dies
By JOHN SEEWER
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North Baltimore rail yard project apparently on track
NORTH BALTIMORE -- CSX Corp. is moving closer to realizing its goal of building an intermodal rail yard west of North Baltimore.
more >>
Abortion protesters suing city
A pro-life group that sued the city of Findlay in federal court over its right to stage a demonstration in town last month is now seeking to recover its legal costs from the city.
more >>
Eight candidates' petitions rejected by elections board
Eight candidates in Hancock County, including McComb Mayor Robert Schwab, were dropped from the November ballot after their candidacy petitions were not certified because of filing errors, according to Hancock County Board of Elections Director Jody O'Brien.
more >>
Task force urges review of flood plain regulations
Findlay's building regulations relating to flood mitigation should be reviewed, according to Mayor Tony Iriti's flood task force.
more >>
Back In Business
The following Findlay area businesses, closed by the recent flooding, have announced their reopening:
more >>
Deputies respond to bomb scare
OTTAWA — Ottawa-Glandorf schools were locked down Wednesday after an item thought to be a bomb was located in the nearby United Way flood relief center.
more >>
Public split on ethanol plant
FOSTORIA — Individuals opposed to construction of an ethanol production plant on Fostoria's east side point to potential risks including respiratory illness, cancer and possible fallout from an explosion.
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No race for Bluffton Council
BLUFFTON — Three candidates will vie for two seats on the Bluffton school board this November, and liquor options will appear before voters in two Bluffton precincts.
more >>
Former Hancock County auditor dies
Former Hancock County auditor Edward Hugus died of cancer last Thursday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 82.
more >>
Owens collecting school supplies
Owens Community College's Findlay campus will help area students affected by the flooding by hosting a school supplies donation drive.
more >>
More winners in Hancock Fair competitions
Open class
more >>
Public Record
Docket
more >>
Local News

Central students to move

By DENISE GRANT

Staff Writer

Most Findlay city schools will open on Monday, but not flood-damaged Central Middle School.

On Wednesday, Superintendent Dean Wittwer announced that the district is moving to "plan B" for Central students, who will attend classes at two other sites.

The goal had been to open Central with the rest of the city schools on Monday. Work on the building has been almost non-stop since the floodwaters receded, but by Wednesday, Wittwer said it was clear that more time is going to be needed.

Central Middle School, located at 200 W. Main Cross St., was the hardest hit of the city schools in the August flood.

Sixth-grade students from Central will attend classes at Owens Community College, 6115 County Road 18. Seventh- and eighth-grade students will attend classes at the Evangelical Free Church, 2515 Heatherwood Drive.

Wittwer said these facilities offer an excellent alternative.

"Really, all we have to do is take our students, teachers and books," said Wittwer.

The student day will be modified to allow for transportation changes, and sack lunches will be available for purchase by Central students attending the alternative sites.

A parent meeting for all Central parents will be held at 7 p.m. today in the Findlay High School auditorium to discuss specific details about the start of school and to answer questions.

More information is available on the district's Web site at www.findlaycityschools.org.

Wittwer said he believes one more week should be enough time to finish the work at Central Middle School.

The building had as much as five feet of water on its basement floor, which houses the district's computer servers, phone system and administrative offices, including those of the superintendent and treasurer.

Wittwer said the first and second floors of the building, which actually house student classrooms, are fine.

"The building has been dried, sanitized and has also received air quality test results well within safe building standards. Our concern is that we need more time for renovations and reconstruction of student areas such as the cafeteria and art room," Wittwer said.

Both the cafeteria and the art room are housed on the basement floor of Central.

District administrators have been working from home, or from offices in other buildings.

District Treasurer Mike Barnhart, who is now running his office from Millstream South, said flood damages and repairs will cost the city schools about $2.4 million. That's before any insurance reimbursement.

The bulk of that cost, just under $2 million, is to cover the damage at Central. Barnhart said that figure has been submitted to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

The current federal disaster declaration, however, does not include public entities like schools or county or city governments.

It will be up to Gov. Ted Strickland to ask for FEMA's assistance for the public entities affected by the flood.

There was some flooding damage to five other city school buildings, including Washington Intermediate, Lincoln Elementary, Northview Primary, Wilson Vance Intermediate and Findlay High School, along with the district's bus garage.

Findlay Schools, which were scheduled to open on Sept. 4, were postponed one week to allow the school district and the City of Findlay to work through the cleanup.



Teachers help out

Findlay school teachers have spent the week helping with that effort, organizing teams of volunteers for all sorts of tasks. Numerous teams of teachers assisted with cleanup, lawn mowing, and other chores.

Staff from Whittier Primary School provided a picnic lunch to neighborhood students, along with games, on Tuesday. Donated clothing and various household items also were made available.

The staff at Jacobs Primary School set up a support center at the school where parents can come in to fill out forms. Speaker phones are available for parents to contact FEMA.

Teachers from Northview Primary School have been volunteering to work in the homes of teachers whose houses had major damage from the flood, and working in the classrooms of their colleagues who have not been able to come to school because of damage to their homes. The group also worked at the Northview building cleaning up the front yard, which had been flooded.

Teachers from Lincoln Elementary School helped pull out drywall and insulation at the homes of flood victims. They also provided free day care on Wednesday morning, and canvassed neighborhoods to offer assistance to anyone needing it.

Staff from Bigelow Hill Intermediate School made meals and took them to 12 displaced Findlay teachers and the families housing them.

Staff members from Central Middle School also canvassed neighborhoods, talking with families affected by the flood and handing out more than 40 loaves of homemade bread.

Contact staff writer Denise Grant at:

(419) 427-8412

denisegrant@thecourier.com

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Library's reopening date still uncertain

By JOY BROWN

staff writer

Findlay-Hancock County Public Library officials said Wednesday they don’t yet know when the flood-ravaged facility on Broadway will reopen, but beginning Monday they’ll be using the undamaged Arlington branch and the Bookmobile to initially re-establish Internet and book borrowing services.

“We thought that since it was a flood (that caused the damage), why not meet at Riverbend?” joked library board of trustees President Ed Railing at a public meeting held there Wednesday night to inform people about library operations and recovery methods.

More than six feet of water flowed into the library’s basement level, where administrative offices, mechanical equipment, the Friends of the Library book cellar, elevator service and storage space were located.

The first floor containing the community room had two feet of water.

Employees were able to save some items by moving them to the second floor, which was not damaged, but what was left downstairs was completely destroyed.

A Cincinnati restoration firm was retained and arrived the Thursday following the flood. According to board Vice President William Doyle, more than one million gallons of water was pumped from the building on that Saturday before massive dehumidifying units, sucking out moisture and blowing 140-degree air into the top floor to prevent mold growth, were installed.

All lower level contents, from drywall to ceiling tile, are now being stripped.

This isn’t the 24,000-square-foot library’s first experience with water damage, though.

“This is the seventh flood event this year alone,” said Director Sybil Galer. “We typically have water problems in that building about 30 times per year.”

But the latest flood has the library taking more drastic measures to “limit damage ... We don’t want to be out of service this long again,” Galer said.

Therefore, the building’s “heart and lungs,” or its electrical, heating and cooling, phone, fire monitoring, and elevator systems will be relocated upstairs by the Bookmobile garage, Galer said.

The book cellar probably won’t return to the basement, and its future location remains uncertain.

“You can’t get everything upstairs, unfortunately, but we’ll do our best to restore the book cellar,” Galer maintained.

Library personnel are working methodically, with the same architectural firm they had initially hired, to create models to promote discussion of possibly building a new library.

They’re also working with inspectors to ensure that the current public building is brought back up to code and is deemed structurally safe for public use.

Doyle dispelled some rumors that have been circulating:

• He assured people that the library does intend to reopen.

• The Arlington branch did not close because it was damaged, he said, but because it was tied technologically into the main Findlay building.

• No structural damage has been found at the main library, and the second-floor collection is “in stable condition.”

While the recovery process continues, the Arlington branch will be open daily during the usual hours that the main library had been operating. “Internet cafe stations” will be set up there, and those with flood-related claims to file will be given priority usage.

Books will be able to be shared again with other libraries through the “Serving Every Ohioan” consortium.

The Bookmobile will also resume routes on Monday, and will include four Findlay stops -- Monday at the Tiffin Avenue Kroger from 12:30-2:30 p.m.; Tuesday at Riverside Park from 12:30-2 p.m.; Wednesday at Great Scot on Broad Avenue from 12:30-2:30 p.m.; and Thursday at the Kroger on Sixth Street from 12:30-2:30 p.m.

Residents can also visit libraries in contiguous counties, along with Shafer research library at the University of Findlay, which charges $5 for a card that allows non-university residents to borrow its materials.

Those who had borrowed books and movies from the main library may begin returning those on Monday at the Bookmobile and in Arlington. Fines for those items are being waived, and the library will “be very understanding” with individuals who lost such items in the flood, Galer said.

“It’s been very painful not to be able to provide library services when the community really needs us right now,” Galer noted.

She recounted a woman who arrived at the library with two borrowed DVDs shortly after the flood. When Galer told the woman to hang onto them for the time being, the woman began crying and explained, “I don’t have a home to take them back to.”

When a citizen asked Wednesday about the possibility of a new library being built as part of the proposed commercial development of the old Brandman tire dump, which is in the flood plain, Doyle was noncommittal.

“The library has been considered as one of the possible inhabitants of that particular area,” he said. “This has actually not formally been approved or denied by the library board. But the board is very sensitive to wet feet.”

Financially, the library isn’t in as bad shape as it could’ve been because of the flooding.

Galer said that when she started as director in 1997, a year when six inches of water entered the building during one flood, the facility had no flood insurance. She pushed for a comprehensive plan, which it now has through Sky Insurance. It also has additional insurance that will cover other damage.

“I filed FEMA papers this morning and I hope that comes through for us as well,” she said.

Members of the public who wish to comment about the library’s restoration and item relocation process, or to offer suggestions, may do so at the library’s Web site at www.findlaylibrary.org (which also includes staff blogs about the ongoing experience).

Contact staff writer Joy Brown at: (419) 427-8496 joybrown@thecourier.com

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Ohio Congressman Paul Gillmor dies

By JOHN SEEWER

Associated Press Writer

TOLEDO — Congressman Paul Gillmor, a Republican from a solidly conservative district in northwest Ohio who spent four decades in politics, was found dead Wednesday in his apartment near Washington. He was 68.

Gillmor was known for his quiet approach and spent nearly 20 years in Congress without drawing much attention to himself.

As a House member he was a solid Republican vote, a reliable conservative on social issues who was a strong proponent of the military and spoke out against abortion.

"He knew how to quietly get things done," said Mary Rose Oakar, a former Democratic U.S. representative from Cleveland. "I'm not saying he wasn't effective. He just was unassuming and quietly did his homework."

Aides found Gillmor's body at his town house in Arlington, Va., after he failed to show up at the Capitol for morning meetings, said John Lisle, a spokesman for Arlington County police.

Homicide investigators were called to the apartment, but foul play is not suspected, Lisle said. "It does not appear, at least preliminarily, to be anything suspicious," he said.

A cause of death had not been released.

"Congressman Gillmor's death comes as a great shock to us all," said a statement released by his office. "Representative Gillmor served the people of Ohio with every ounce of his soul and today he passed on doing the job he loved."

His seat will remain open until a special election is held, said John McClelland, a spokesman for the Ohio Republican Party. Gov. Ted Strickland will set the date.

Gillmor was first elected to Congress in 1988 to a seat he had eyed for years.

Although easily elected to each term, he did face significant primary fights during his career in the 5th District. He first won the GOP nomination by eking out a 27-vote victory over Robert Latta, who was trying to follow in the footsteps of his father, Republican Rep. Delbert Latta.

His long career crossed paths with many state leaders.

"Paul was one of the most conscientious public servants I've ever met," said GOP U.S. Sen. George Voinovich from Ohio. "Paul was a role model for all of us who serve in public office."

Strickland, a Democrat, was a member of the Ohio Congressional delegation for 12 years with Gillmor.

"Paul was a friend and a colleague," Strickland said. "Ohio has lost a truly decent and devoted public servant."

Gillmor led efforts to cleanup industrial contaminated sites and enact financial service reforms. He also was a strong advocate of a constitutional amendment to ban unfunded mandates on the states.

"He wasn't a headline grabber," said Tom Wiseman, a former mayor of Defiance, which is part of Gillmor's district. "He was a doer."

Wiseman said Gillmor also worked to support programs that help veterans. "That was one area that very few knew about," he said.

Gillmor served as a Vietnam War-era judge advocate in the Air Force before going into politics.

He had been in Ohio in recent weeks to attend a series of town meetings and tour areas of the state that were hit hard by flooding.

The son of a banker, he was born in Tiffin and grew up nearby in the small town of Old Fort. A career politician, Gillmor became a state senator when he was 27, eventually rising to Senate president. He spent 22 years in the Ohio senate and made an unsuccessful run for governor in 1986.

In recent years, Gillmor fought off accusations that he ignored his district and spent almost all of his time at his homes near Washington and Columbus.

"I was born and raised in the district," Gillmor said during a bitter 2002 primary campaign. "I consider it my home."

He is survived by his wife, Karen, two daughters and three sons.

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North Baltimore rail yard project apparently on track

By JOY BROWN

STAFF WRITER

NORTH BALTIMORE -- CSX Corp. is moving closer to realizing its goal of building an intermodal rail yard west of North Baltimore.

CSX was able to acquire a 65-acre property that it needs for the project, and two country roads that cross the planned rail yard site were recently vacated.

According to records at the Wood County Commissioners’ Office, the Henry Township Trustees filed a petition in July with the county to vacate portions of Potter and Wingston roads, which run north and south and cross over CSX’s main line that runs east and west.

The commissioners, after notifying adjacent landowners by mail, then held an Aug. 21 hearing where they approved the road vacations, which are to actually go into effect “when CSX notifies the county that construction of the intermodal transportation facility is to commence,” a commissioners’ resolution states -- something that CSX has yet to do.

According to a report by Wood County Engineer Raymond Huber, no land between Ohio 18 and the railroad tracks would be landlocked by these road vacations.

Huber also said that the Henry Township Trustees have offered to pay for a turn-around system to be built at the new south end of each road; and land north of the tracks and on the roads in question will be accessible via Needles Road.

Also, Huber said his office is preparing plans for the replacement of two area bridges -- one at the intersection of Potter and Needles roads, and the other about 100 yards north of that intersection on Potter Road.

The new bridges would be built to accommodate the most current state weight requirements, and would be wide enough to allow farm machinery to pass.



CSX optimistic

“We haven’t formally announced that the project is officially going to move forward,” Dan Murphy, CSX’s director of public projects, said this week. “But we are optimistic.”

Murphy confirmed that some land needed for the rail yard was recently sold to a CSX subsidiary company. Wood County auditor records show that Gene Barker of McComb sold 65 acres of farmland, located at the corner of Ohio 18 and Potter Road, to Evansville Western Railway, based in Paducah, Ky., for $487,500 (or $7,500 an acre).

The Barker property purchase is the first official sale involving the 500 acres that CSX has been trying to buy. The company wants to acquire a wedge of land south of its tracks along Ohio 18 (Deshler Road), between Range Line Road and Wingston Road.

Opposition from some landowners, both publicly and in private, had slowed the process.

CSX and local government leaders held some “town hall” meetings last spring in order to gauge public mood, garner information and answer any questions that residents had about the proposed project, but the company has generally kept mum this summer on any real estate progress it was making.

Now, according to Murphy, CSX hopes to finish purchasing the remainder of the land it wants “by the first quarter of 2008.”

If it becomes a reality, the $60 million “intermodal block swap yard” would employ between 75 and 100 workers earning an average of $50,000 annually, CSX has said.

An Indiana site had also been considered, but North Baltimore became the frontrunner in February due to its central location between the company’s Chicago hub and the east coast.

Along with transferring goods via truck and train at the rail yard, the site would serve as a coal car inspection location.

Although the yard would generate truck traffic between the yard and Interstate 75, CSX claims train traffic would increase very little.



Opposition

Area residents -- some landowners who own property that CSX wants, along with those living adjacent to such property -- have cited concerns about safety, drainage and land rights issues, and some did so again at the Aug. 21 county commissioners’ meeting.

“It seems that the Henry Township Trustees have sold us down the proverbial road again,” the Henry Matthes family, who live on three tracts of land on Wingston Road, wrote to the commissioners. “It seems that whatever big business and Bowling Green want seems to be the way it is rather than what the actual people living there want. If you voice your opinion then you are threatened with legal action just because you oppose them. I thought this was still a democracy?”

The family’s letter went on to cite potential safety issues concerning trains that sometimes block area crossings.

Members of the Cloyce Wells, Glenn Wells, Richard Wells, Ben Wells, Terry Hurst and Greg Panning families also wrote to express concerns about drainage issues which they think could affect remaining farms should the project become a reality.

Neither CSX nor the county will hold a public forum to discuss this, the families complained. “We need these issues addressed so we know our farms are not going to be affected by more blocked ditches!” the families wrote.

Some also were concerned about public notification concerning the proposed road vacations.

Wood County Board of Commissioners Clerk Kristy Muir said notices were mailed to landowners who would be affected by the road vacations, and the commissioners’ meeting agenda that listed the vacation petition was posted 24 hours beforehand on the commissioners’ Web site and in the courthouse lobby by the elevators.

Muir also said that since the township trustees filed the petition, if the commissioners had failed to vote on it within 60 days of that filing, the roads would’ve been vacated anyway in accordance with Ohio law.

Contact staff writer Joy Brown at: (419) 427-8496 joybrown@thecourier.com

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Abortion protesters suing city

By JOHN GRABER

STAFF WRITER

A pro-life group that sued the city of Findlay in federal court over its right to stage a demonstration in town last month is now seeking to recover its legal costs from the city.

Milwaukee-based Missionaries to the Preborn is seeking $13,500 in attorney fees, but city officials don’t plan on paying.

“We just had our pretrial with the judge the other day and said, 'Give us our day in court,’” Findlay Law Director David Hackenberg said. “We’ll go from there.”

The group, which carried four-foot-tall signs depicting pictures of aborted fetuses near the intersection of Bright Road and Tiffin Avenue, doesn’t have a right to the money, according to Hackenberg.

“Attorney’s fees, that’s not something you automatically get when you go to court,” he said. “It happens a vast minority of time.”

The group is also seeking $1 in nominal damages, but Hackenberg isn’t going along with that either because paying would be tantamount to an admission of guilt.

“Not without a fight, they picked the wrong city,” Hackenberg said.

Pastor Matt Trewhella, who heads the Missionaries to the Preborn, said the city owes the group money because the group was forced to file a lawsuit in order to be allowed to demonstrate.

“Because we had to incur legal fees to exercise our First Amendment rights,” Trewhella said. “Had the city obeyed the Constitution and allowed us to exercise our rights, we wouldn’t have had to take legal action.”

The group, which was touring Northwest Ohio at the time, tried to hold a demonstration in Findlay on July 31. However, group members claim they were told they had to leave because they did not have a permit.

That led group members to file a lawsuit in the U.S. Northern District Court in Toledo, claiming their First and 14th Amendment rights (the right to free speech and the right to due process and equal protection under the law) were violated because they were told they needed a permit to demonstrate. They also said they were then given the runaround when they asked how to obtain a permit.

However, city officials say they were opposed to the group’s demonstration because group members were creating safety problems with their photographs and by running out into traffic, not because of the content of the message.

The situation was resolved when the group filed for a restraining order against the city, in order to allow its members to return to town, and city officials agreed to the request before the judge ruled.

So the group returned to the same street corner on Aug. 10 with mixed results. Many people seemed to agree with the group’s message but objected to the graphic detail of the photographs.

Missionaries to the Preborn has traveled to more than 450 locations around the country spreading its pro-life message. Members recently have been touring Ohio and conducted similar demonstrations in Defiance, Toledo, Lima, Springfield, Kettering, Dayton and Cincinnati.

Contact staff writer John Graber at: (419) 427-8417 johngraber@thecourier.com

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Eight candidates' petitions rejected by elections board

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

Eight candidates in Hancock County, including McComb Mayor Robert Schwab, were dropped from the November ballot after their candidacy petitions were not certified because of filing errors, according to Hancock County Board of Elections Director Jody O'Brien.

Schwab filed for re-election, but his petition was not certified because he didn't sign his circulator statement.

The circulator statement verifies that the candidate personally witnessed everyone sign his petition. If not signed, the petition is automatically tossed out.

That means his opponent — Robin Rader — will run against two write-in candidates in November, Larry Sudlow and Joseph Wasson.

Schwab is not the only candidate who will lose out because of filing errors.

Two potential candidates for Arlington Village Council, Michael Best and Kristie Fox, have been dropped from the ballot.

Best failed to fill out his circulator statement, and Fox didn't have enough valid signatures on her petition.

All signatures are checked for validity — those signing must be residents of Hancock County who are registered to vote.

In Benton Ridge, a candidate for village fiscal officer, Wendy Gonso, and a candidate for mayor, Kevin Schoonover, were disqualified. Both failed to sign their circulator statements.

In Jenera, two village council candidates were disqualified for petition errors — Tracy S. Clinger and Donn Rieder. Clinger didn't have enough valid signatures and Rieder didn't sign his circulator statement.

William Drown, a candidate for Vanlue mayor, was also disqualified because he failed to sign his circulator statement.

O'Brien said that considering the number of candidates filing, it is not surprising that eight petitions were not certified.

"It's about an average number," she said Wednesday.

She said there is no recourse for most candidates dropped from the ballot because of filing errors.

The filing deadline for nonpartisan candidacy petitions originally was Aug. 23, but county offices were closed that week due to flooding, and the deadline was moved back to Aug. 27.

The filing deadline for write-in candidates for the November election was Wednesday by 4 p.m.

Besides the two McComb mayoral candidates, the only other write-in candidate to file was Joseph Mattoon for Cory-Rawson school board.

Board of Elections Director Lori Miller said write-in candidates' petitions will be certified at 10 a.m. Friday.

Contact Staff Writer Michelle Reiter at:

(419) 427-8497

michellereiter@thecourier.com

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Task force urges review of flood plain regulations

By JOHN GRABER

STAFF WRITER

Findlay's building regulations relating to flood mitigation should be reviewed, according to Mayor Tony Iriti's flood task force.

The task force voted unanimously Wednesday to recommend that city council review the city's flood plain regulations (which govern building specifications in the 100-year flood plain), and evaluate whether the city's requirements for the creation of water retention/detention ponds are adequate.

The task force also recommended that council consider matching the city's retention/detention pond standards with Hancock County's, so that areas annexed into the city are already up to code.

Hancock County officials started looking at their retention/detention pond requirements after last winter's flooding.

County officials are considering requiring that all new retention/detention ponds be able to handle a 100-year flood or something equivalent to that, said Hancock County Commissioner Ed Ingold, a task force member.

County Engineer Steve Wilson, who is also a task force member, said whatever county officials come up with will ultimately have to be tried in the court of public opinion.

"We can make all the recommendations we want, but if the developers or public say it's going to be too expensive and put up a big ballyhoo, I don't know," Wilson said.

One possibility that Iriti has in mind for tightening up the flood plain regulations is to adopt a "free board" policy, which would require the bottom floor of any new building or any substantially renovated building inside the flood plain to be at least one foot above the 100-year flood level.

Iriti is hoping to have some specific recommendations ready for city council's Sept. 18 meeting.

Contact staff writer John Graber at:

(419) 427-8417

johngraber@thecourier.com

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Back In Business

The following Findlay area businesses, closed by the recent flooding, have announced their reopening:

• Automotive Electronic Service, 240 E. Front St.

• The Bike Shop of Findlay, 125 W. Sandusky St.

• Bindel's Appliance, 214 S. Main St.

• Bread Kneads, 510 S. Blanchard St.

• CIH Salon, 106 S. West St.

• Diversified Woodworking & Supply, 310 E. Crawford St.

• Elks Lodge, 601 S. Main St.

• Eyes On Main, 334 S. Main St.

• Findlay ACE Hardware, 200 S. Main St.

• Flag City Auto Glass, 121 E. Crawford St.

• House of Awards and Shoes, 209 S. Main St.

• Longberry Paint 'N' Paper, 217 Broadway.

• Mad Hatter Promotions, relocated to 230 W. Sandusky St.

• Main Street News, 501 S. Main St.

• Martin's Academy of Tae Kwon Do, 1212 Blanchard Ave.

• Mother Hubbard's Learning Cupboard, 219 Broadway.

• Rossilli's Restaurant, 217 S. Main St.

• Snyder, Alge & Welch law firm, relocated to 101 W. Sandusky St., Suite 313.

• Springs of Life, 112 S. Main St.

• Star Pawn Shop, 211 N. Main St.

• Wolfies, 340 Glessner Ave.

Reopenings that were previously announced:

• City Dry Cleaning, 116 E. Main Cross St.

• New Adventure Computer & Electronics, 223 Broadway.

• Rustic Razor, 227 W. Crawford St.

• Southside Family Restaurant, 3050 S. Main St.

• Streicher's Quickprint, 109 S. Main St.

• Flores Cafe, 220 S. Main St.

• Cavins Kitchen Village, 215 S. Main St.

• Disabled American Veterans, Buddy Chapter 43, 201 E. Front St.

• Hair After, 414 E. Sandusky St.

• Hair Studio Salon and Spa, 622 E. Sandusky St.

• House of Awards and Sports, 419 N. Main St.

• Jim's Trophies and Screen Printing, 701 Howard St.

• Lee's Famous Recipe Chicken, 427 Tiffin Ave., taking orders through the drive-through and by carryout only.

• Masterson's ACE Hardware, 10205 U.S. 224 West.

• Ottawa branch office of ERA Noakes-Rooney & Associates, temporarily at 819 N. Locust, Suite 1, Ottawa.

• Oxley, Malone, Hollister, O'Malley & Warren law firm temporarily located at 6566 County Road 236.

• Suntime Professional Auto Detailing is now operating at 1043 Bright Road, in the rear building of Gene Stevens Honda.

• The Alteration Shop & In-Stitches Monogramming, 303 E. Sandusky St.

The Courier is asking businesses that have reopened after the flood to please e-mail the Courier's business reporter, Lou Wilin, at louwilin@thecourier.com; or e-mail news@thecourier.com; or drop off a note for Wilin at the Courier's newsroom. Tell us the name of your business, and your address.

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Deputies respond to bomb scare

OTTAWA — Ottawa-Glandorf schools were locked down Wednesday after an item thought to be a bomb was located in the nearby United Way flood relief center.

This incident was reported at 2:17 p.m. Wednesday to the Putnam County Sheriff's Office.

The area was evacuated and all train traffic was stopped.

A device constructed of PVC was about one foot long with end caps, according to the sheriff's office.

The Lima Police Department bomb squad X-rayed the device and used a mechanical robot to remove the item from the rear of the building.

The item was destroyed with a water gun. Rice and coiled aluminum foil were found in the device. It had not been determined how this item arrived at the center.

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Public split on ethanol plant

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

FOSTORIA — Individuals opposed to construction of an ethanol production plant on Fostoria's east side point to potential risks including respiratory illness, cancer and possible fallout from an explosion.

But those who support the plant point to reduced U.S. dependency on foreign oil and the company's history of operating successful plants with no indications of odors or problems at other sites.

About 50 people attended the hearing held to obtain public input on the plant's draft air pollution control permit-to-install. Jan Tredway, a representative of the Division of Air Pollution Control, OEPA Northwest District Office, Bowling Green, and Darla Peelle, with the public interest center of OEPA in Columbus, moderated the hearing.

The session, held in the Performing Arts Center at Fostoria High School, was about evenly split between supporters — mainly farmers and farm-related groups — and those against the plant — mainly those who live, or know someone who lives, near the site.

The concerns were similar to a meeting held in early August on the draft wastewater discharge permit — the possible effects the plant would have on residents' health and quality of life.

Opponents also pointed out that Longfellow Elementary School and the municipal stadium are located within 1.5 miles of the construction site.

However, supporters say they have just as much concern for the environment, since farmers and their families live where they work.

They also stressed that it would bring a higher price for farmers' corn. The company will use about 21 million bushels of corn annually to produce 69 million gallons of fuel-grade ethanol.

POET, a South Dakota ethanol company, is building the facility and will operate it under the name Fostoria Ethanol LLC.

Site work has already begun on the property, located off Ohio 12 on the city's east side, and a ground-breaking ceremony was held last month. The facility is expected to open in about a year.

However, actual operations at the location cannot begin until final approval of all state-required permits.

The federal Clean Air Act and its amendments regulate the type and quantity of materials that may be discharged into the air. The maximum allowable emission levels are designed to protect human health and the environment, according to OEPA information, and those levels are set in permits issued by the agency.

The draft air pollution control permit-to-install for the ethanol plant sets emission limits for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and particulate matter.

It was the emission of those items, at any level, and the company's unwillingness reportedly to spend an additional $1.2 million (of a proposed $130 million project) on additional emission controls, which upset several residents.

About 15 people made public comments for the record during the hearing portion of the evening, which followed a public information session during which Tredway outlined the OEPA's guidelines for the plant.

Individuals who couldn't attend the session may make written comments on the permit application postmarked by the end of business today. Anyone may submit comments or request to be on the mailing list for information. OEPA will take all public comments into consideration before deciding whether to issue or deny the permit.

To comment, or to receive information on the draft air permit, contact Jan Tredway, Division of Air Pollution Control, Ohio EPA Northwest District Office, 347 N. Dunbridge Road, Bowling Green 43402, call (419) 373-3127 or via e-mail: jan.tredway@epa.state.oh.us

The application and other related materials are available for review at the Ohio EPA office. Call (419) 352-8461 to make an appointment.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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No race for Bluffton Council

By ERIC SCHAADT

Staff Writer

BLUFFTON — Three candidates will vie for two seats on the Bluffton school board this November, and liquor options will appear before voters in two Bluffton precincts.

However, as of late Wednesday afternoon — the deadline for write-in candidates — the Allen County Board of Elections reported that no candidates will appear on the fall ballot for two available seats on Bluffton Council.

Those two positions likely will be filled by the village council in January 2008.

Last February, incumbent Jerry Cupples had his re-election bid derailed when he was dropped from the primary ballot because dates were missing on his petition form.

His attempt to have his name listed on the fall ballot — as an independent candidate — also was denied.

The Ohio Secretary of State Office had issued an advisory, stating that a candidate whose petition was rejected could not seek that same office on another ticket during the same election cycle.

That advisory was interpreted by county election officials that Cupples could not have another try for council for the November election as an independent candidate.

"You get one bite of the apple, so to speak," Keith Cunningham, director of the Allen County Board of Elections, said Wednesday.

A second incumbent, Councilman Dennis Gallant, is not running for another term.

But while there will be no council race this November, three Bluffton residents — David Huber, Jeremy Scoles and Renee Smith — will compete for two open school board seats.

Two school board incumbents, Gary Bishop and Rick Matter, did not seek re-election.

Also, Bluffton Mayor Fred Rodabaugh will be unchallenged in his re-election bid.

Elsewhere, voters in Bluffton Precinct E will decide the fate of a D 5 liquor permit request to sell beer, wine, mixed beverages and spirituous liquor at the Centre of Bluffton, 601 N. Main St.

And voters in Bluffton's Precinct A will vote on a request from Luke's Bar and Grill, 133 N. Main St., to possess a D 2 liquor permit.

A D 2 permit allows the sale of wine and pre-packaged drinks on premises.

Contact staff writer Eric Schaadt at:

(419) 427-8414

ericschaadt@thecourier.com

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Former Hancock County auditor dies

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

Former Hancock County auditor Edward Hugus died of cancer last Thursday at his home in Scottsdale, Ariz. He was 82.

The Republican was elected to five consecutive terms as county auditor, serving from 1971 to 1987, before retiring.

Hugus' competence and personable manner enabled him to navigate controversies over county finances, and deal with property owners who sometimes complained that their property values — and taxes — should be lower.

Recalling one controversy, former county commissioner William Recker said Hugus was a key supporter of the county building a new jail in the late 1980s.

Back then, the old county jail was over a century old, outdated and overcrowded. Jail sentences were being delayed and backlogged. But as much as a new jail was needed, the public was indifferent about it.

In 1984, county voters trounced a proposed tax hike for a new jail. Recker, only a year later, proposed to county officials that construction of a new jail be financed without approaching voters for a tax hike.

Either Hugus or then-prosecutor Joseph Niemeyer could have blocked any spending for a new jail, Recker said, and it would have been safer for both elected officials to put off the project.

But behind the scenes, Hugus gave the action his blessing, setting into motion the planning and construction of the justice center, according to Recker.

Some people later accused county officials of disregarding the voters' statement at the polls in 1984.

"That was an extremely controversial move," Recker said. "If he (Hugus) hadn't approved it, it wouldn't have been done."

To south Findlay residents, Hugus was probably more familiar for his wiry physique, running under the canopies of mature trees on South Main Street.

He ran a 26-mile marathon in Columbus at the age of 62.

Shortly after retiring in 1987, Hugus and his wife, Joan, moved to the Phoenix area. She survives.

His obituary appears on Page A5 of today's edition of The Courier.

Contact staff writer Lou Wilin at:

(419) 427-8413

louwilin@thecourier.com

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Owens collecting school supplies

Owens Community College's Findlay campus will help area students affected by the flooding by hosting a school supplies donation drive.

Starting today and continuing through Friday, Sept. 14, the Findlay area Campus Students Involved organization will be accepting community donations to help Findlay City Schools children in need of school supplies following the flooding.

Items being collected include backpacks, crayons, markers, bottles of glue, glue sticks, colored pencils, pencils, pink erasers, school boxes, pocket folders and calculators, among many other items.

Area residents can drop off their donations in the commons area.

Also, the campus is encouraging Owens students whose textbooks have been lost or damaged by flooding to stop by the college's bookstore where representatives will work with students to replace the lost or damaged textbooks free of charge.

Owens also is inviting displaced businesses and community organizations in need of meeting space to visit the college for potential scheduling arrangements.

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More winners in Hancock Fair competitions

Open class

Baking, canning, candy

Jells:

Blackberry — Kay Livingston, Arlington, first; Toni Hassan, McComb, second.

Cherry — Bob Bingle, Jenera.

Peach — Marcia Schwab, McComb.

Grape — Marcia Schwab, first; Susan Neal, Arcadia, second.

Black raspberry — Kay Livingston.

Apple — Toni Hassan.

Red raspberry — Tonita Altvater, Findlay.

Elderberry — Marcia Schwab.

Any other — Marcia Schwab, first; Tonita Altvater, second.

Best of show — Marcia Schwab.

Canned fruit:

Applesauce — Stephanie Beach, Arlington.

Peaches — Shirley Detamore, McComb, first; Stephanie Beach, second.

Black raspberries — Kay Livingston, Arlington.

Plums — Karen Hassan, Mount Cory, first; Mandy Warren, Jenera, second.

Cherries (red sour) — Marcia Schwab, McComb, first; Kay Livingston, second.

Cherries (red sweet) — Marcia Schwab, first; Kay Livingston, second.

Pears — Bob Bingle, Jenera, first; Kay Livingston, second.

Pie filling (peach) — Marcia Schwab, first; Esther Spaeth, Jenera, second.

Pie filling (apple) — Tonita Altvater, Findlay, first; Kay Livingston, second.

Fruit, any other — Mandy Warren, first; Stephanie Beach, second.

Best of show — Shirley Detamore.

Canned vegetables:

Tomatoes — Stephanie Beach, Arlington, first; Lynn Brink, Findlay, second.

Corn — Mandy Warren, Jenera, first; Marcia Schwab, McComb, second.

Beans (green string) — Marcia Schwab, first; Toni Hassan, McComb, second.

Beans (yellow string) — Marcia Schwab.

Tomato juice — Bob Bingle, Jenera, first; Toni Hassan, second.

Peas — Bob Bingle, first; Stephanie Beach, second.

Red beets — Marcia Schwab, first; Clarence Ferrell, Deshler, second.

Carrots — Stephanie Beach, first; Clarence Ferrell, second.

Any other — Marcia Schwab, first; Toni Hassan, second.

Best of show — Bob Bingle.

Canned meats:

Beef — Karen Hassan, Mount Cory, first; Stephanie Beach, Arlington, second.

Pork — Marcia Schwab, McComb, first; Stephanie Beach, second.

Chicken — Kay Livingston, Arlington, first; Stephanie Beach, second.

Minced meats — Kay Livingston.

Any meat vegetable soup — Karen Hassan, first; Clarence Ferrell, Deshler, second.

Any other — Clarence Ferrell.

Best of show — Marcia Schwab.

Pickles:

Sweet pickles — Toni Hassan, McComb, first; Kay Livingston, Arlington, second.

Dill pickles — Marcia Schwab, McComb, first; Karyn Kolan, Findlay, second.

Zucchini pickles — Stephanie Beach, Arlington, first; Cindy Lee Boyer, Findlay, second.

Pickled relish — Marcia Schwab, first; Kay Livingston, second.

Beets, pickled — Jill Smith, McComb, first; Marcia Schwab, second.

Bread and butter pickles — Marcia Schwab, first; Toni Hassan, second.

Any other — Marcia Schwab.

Best of show — Marcia Schwab.

Miscellaneous sauces and catsup:

Barbecue sauce — Cindy Lee Boyer, Findlay.

Chili sauce — Bob Bingle, Jenera.

Pizza sauce — Marcia Schwab, McComb, first; Toni Hassan, McComb, second.

Spaghetti sauce — Marcia Schwab, first; Jill Smith, McComb, second.

Tomato catsup — Jane Kirian, Alvada, first; Cindy Lee Boyer, second.

Salsa (vegetables) — Marcia Schwab, first; Cindy Lee Boyer, second.

Salsa (fruit) — Carolyn Dodge, Williamstown.

Any other — Lisa Line, Arlington, first; Susan Wolford, Findlay, second.

Best of show — Marcia Schwab.

Theme gift basket contest:

Any occasion, 8-12 years old — Luke Schaffer, Findlay, first; Michaela Breece, Alvada, second.

Any occasion, 13-19 years old — Kaitlin Giesey, Findlay, first; Maggie Morehart, Findlay, second.

Any occasion, over 19 — Meg Farmer, Findlay, first; Lynn Dorman, Findlay, second.

Other holiday, 8-12 years old — Lydia Schaffer, Findlay.

Other holiday, 13-19 years old — Natalie Schaffer, Findlay.

Christmas, 8-12 years old — Lydia Schaffer.

Christmas, over 19 — Cindy Lee Boyer, Findlay, first; Laura Breece, Alvada, second.

Dairy cattle

Guernsey winners:

Junior heifer calf — Richard Badertscher, Bluffton, first; Wayne Smith, Findlay, second.

Intermediate heifer calf — Seth Holliger, Williamstown, first; Wayne Smith, second.

Summer yearling heifer, junior yearling heifer, intermediate yearling heifer, senior yearling heifer, 2-year-old cow, produce of dam, get of sire — Wayne Smith.

Cow, 3 years old — Richard Badertscher, first; Wayne Smith, second.

Cow, 4 years old and older — Richard Badertscher.

Best three females — Richard Badertscher, first; Wayne Smith, second.

Grand champion and senior champion — Richard Badertscher.

Junior champion — Seth Holliger.

Holstein winners:

Junior heifer calf — Bill Cole, Jenera, first; Dan Shoop, McComb, second.

Intermediate heifer calf — Bill Cole, first; Michael Deter, Findlay, second.

Senior heifer calf — Bill Cole, first; Rex Roy, McComb, second.

Summer yearling heifer — Dale Dirkson, Kenton.

Intermediate yearling heifer — Rex Roy, first; Dan Shoop, second.

Senior yearling heifer — Bill Cole, first; Rian Roy, McComb, second.

Cow, 2 years old — Rex Roy.

Cow, 3 years old — Rian Roy.

Cow, 4 years old and older — James Cole, Bloomville, first; Dan Shoop, second.

Best three females — Dan Shoop, first; Rex Roy, second.

Produce of dam — Bill Cole.

Grand champion and senior champion — James Cole.

Junior champion — Bill Cole.

Brown Swiss winners:

Junior heifer calf, intermediate heifer calf, intermediate yearling heifer, senior yearling heifer, cow 3 years old, best three females, grand champion, senior champion, junior champion — Dale Dirkson, Kenton.

Ayrshire winner:

Intermediate yearling heifer, grand champion, junior champion — Dale Dirkson.

Jersey winners:

Junior heifer calf — Tristen Spahr, Findlay.

Intermediate heifer calf — Tristen Spahr, first; Dale Dirkson, second.

Senior heifer calf — Taylor Allen, Findlay, first; Tristen Spahr, second.

Summer yearling heifer — Dale Dirkson.

Junior yearling heifer — Karen Oberst, Findlay, first and second.

Intermediate yearling heifer — Karen Oberst, first; Dale Dirkson, second.

Senior yearling heifer — Brian Spahr, Findlay, first; Dale Dirkson, second.

Best three females — Dale Dirkson.

Grand champion and junior champion — Karen Oberst.

All other breeds:

Intermediate heifer calf, summer yearling heifer, grand champion, junior champion — Dale Dirkson.

Beef

Angus winners:

Bull 2 years or older; cow 2 years or older; heifer, junior yearling; cow and calf; grand champion male and grand champion female — David Ragless, Van Buren.

Bull, junior calf — David Ragless, first; Jeff Cole, Mount Blanchard, second.

Heifer, junior calf — Brandon May, Findlay, first; Kody Frysinger, Findlay, second.

Shorthorn winners:

Bull, junior calf; heifer, junior calf; pair of calves; grand champion male and grand champion female — Jack Hamilton, Findlay.

Heifer, junior yearling — Claire Bateson, Arlington.

Crossbred winners:

Bull, junior calf; pair of calves; grand champion male — Troy Hartman, Arlington.

Heifer, junior yearling — John Rinker, Van Buren, first; John Meents, Jenera, second.

Heifer, summer yearling — John Meents, first; Jeff Cole, Mount Blanchard, second.

Heifer, junior calf — Tyler Horn, Arlington, first; Troy Hartman, second.

Grand champion female — John Rinker.

Pinzgauer winners:

Bull, yearling; cow 2 years or older; heifer, summer yearling; heifer, senior calf; heifer, junior calf; grand champion male and reserve champion — Jeff Cole, Mount Blanchard.

All other breeds:

Bull, junior calf; cow 2 years or older; cow and calf — Don Stine, Findlay, first and second.

Heifer, junior calf; pair of calves; grand champion male and grand champion female — Don Stine.

Heifer, senior yearling — Rodney Warnimont, Findlay.

Maine Anjou winners:

Bull, yearling; and grand champion male — Jodi Rickle, Findlay.

Grand champion female, and pair of calves — Levi Beagle, Findlay.

Bull, junior calf; cow 2 years or older; heifer, junior calf — Levi Beagle, first and second.

Heifer, senior yearling; heifer, junior yearling — Bret Rickle, Findlay.

Cow and calf — Levi Beagle, first; Bret Rickle, second.

Exhibitor's herd winner: Bret Rickle.

Sheep

Lamb carcass show — Ted Boehm, Rawson, first; Bob Hanna, McComb, second.

Southdown winners:

Champion yearling ram, champion yearling ewe, champion flock — Zac Metzger, Arlington.

Ram, 1 year and under 2; pair of ewe lambs — Zac Metzger, first; David Cunningham, Arcadia, second.

Pair of yearling rams — Taylor Cunningham, Arcadia.

Ram under 1 year; ewe 1 year and under 2; ewe under 1 year — Zac Metzger, first and second.

Pair of ram lambs; pair of yearling ewes; pen of four lambs; exhibitor's young flock — Zac Metzger, first; Taylor Cunningham, second.

Shropshire winners:

Champion ram lamb, champion yearling ewe, champion flock — Ronald Evans, Ada.

Ram 1 year and under 2 — Jodi Cobb, McComb, first and second.

Pair of yearling rams — Jodi Cobb.

Ram under 1 year — Ronald Evans, Ada, first and second.

Pair of ram lambs — Ronald Evans, first; Jodi Cobb, second.

Ewe 1 year and under 2; ewe under 1 year — Ronald Evans, first and second.

Pair of yearling ewes; pair of ewe lambs; pen of four lambs; exhibitor's young flock — Ronald Evans, first; Jodi Cobb, second.

Dorset winners:

Champion yearling ram — Taylor Cunningham, Arcadia.

Champion yearling ewe, champion flock — David Cunningham, Arcadia.

Ram 1 year and under 2; pen of four lambs; exhibitor's young flock — David Cunningham.

Ewe 1 year and under 2; pair of yearling ewes; pair of ewe lambs — David Cunningham, first; Taylor Cunningham, second.

Ram under 1 year; pair of ram lambs — Taylor Cunningham, first; David Cunningham, second.

Ewe under 1 year — David Cunningham, first; Derek Cunningham, second.

Columbia winners:

Champion yearling ram — Mark Rehus, Findlay.

Champion yearling ewe, champion flock — Steve Cobb, McComb.

Ram 1 year and under 2 — Mark Rehus, first; Steve Cobb, second.

Ram under 1 year, pair of ewe lambs — David Inbody, Blufton, first; Steve Cobb, second.

Pair of ram lambs, pair of yearling ewes, pen of four lambs, exhibitor's young flock — Steve Cobb, first; David Inbody, second.

Ewe 1 year and under 2 — Steve Cobb, first and second.

Ewe under 1 year — Steve Cobb, first; Mark Rehus, Findlay, second.

Rambouillet winners:

Champion ram lamb, champion yearling ewe, champion flock — David Inbody, Bluffton.

Ram 1 year and under 2 — David Inbody.

Ram under 1 year; ewe 1 year and under 2; ewe under 1 year — David Inbody, first and second.

Pair of ram lambs; pair of yearling ewes; pair of ewe lambs; pen of four lambs; exhibitor's young flock — David Inbody, first; Donna Inbody, Bluffton, second.

Merino winners:

Champion yearling ram — Steven Diller, Harrod.

Champion yearling ewe, champion flock — Christine Diller, Harrod.

Ewe 1 year and under 2; ewe under 1 year — Amy Schroeder, McComb, first and second.

Pair of ewe lambs — Amy Schroeder.

Ram 1 year and under 2 — Steven Diller, first and second.

Pair of yearling rams — Steven Diller.

Ram under 1 year, ewe 1 year and under 2, ewe under 1 year — Christine Diller, first and second.

Pair of ram lambs, pair of yearling ewes, pair of ewe lambs, pen of four lambs, exhibitor's young flock — Christine Diller, first; Steven Diller, second.

Suffolk winners:

Ram under 1 year, ewe 1 year and under 2, ewe under 1 year — John Jacoby, McComb, first and second.

Pair of ram lambs, pair of yearling ewes, pair of ewe lambs, pen of four lambs, exhibitor's young flock — John Jacoby.

Cheviot winners:

Ram 1 year and under 2 — Alvin Shoop, McComb, first; Alan Shoop, McComb, second.

Pair of yearling rams — Alan Shoop, first; Alvin Shoop, second.

Ram under 1 year, ewe under 1 year — Alvin Shoop, first and second.

Pair of ram lambs, pair of ewe lambs, pen of four lambs, exhibitor's young flock — Alvin Shoop, first; Jodi Cobb, McComb, second.

Ewe 1 year and under 2 — Jodi Cobb, first and second.

Pair of yearling ewes — Jodi Cobb, first; Alvin Shoop, second.

Any other breed winners:

Ram under 1 year, ewe under 1 year — Ronald Evans, Ada, first and second.

Pair of ram lambs, pair of ewe lambs, pen of four lambs — Ronald Evans.

Market lamb winners:

Lightweight — Nathan Zuercher, Jenera, first; Stephen Freed, Forest, second.

Heavyweight — Tyler Horn, Arlington, first; Zac Metzger, Arlington, second.

Rabbits

New Zealand winners:

Senior buck — Ed Boutwell, Carey, first; James Insley, Benton Ridge, second.

Senior doe — Ed Boutwell, first and second.

Six- to eight-month buck — Ed Boutwell.

Six- to eight-month doe — Susan Rader, McComb, first; Chelsea Insley, Benton Ridge, second.

Junior buck — Ed Boutwell, first and second.

Junior doe — Ed Boutwell, first; Ashton Beach, Arlington, second.

Best of breed, best opposite — Ed Boutwell.

Giant Chinchilla winners:

Senior buck, senior doe — Betsy Conrad, McComb, first and second.

Best of breed, best opposite — Betsy Conrad.

Californians winners:

Senior buck — Olivia Crawford, Findlay, first; Cameryn Clark, McComb, second.

Senior doe — Olivia Crawford, first; Brittany Warren, Jenera, second.

Junior buck — Olivia Crawford, first; Ryan Inbody, Alvada, second.

Junior doe — Kyle Inbody, Alvada, first; Brittany Warren, second.

Best of breed, best opposite — Olivia Crawford.

AOV winners:

Senior doe — Donell Foust, Van Buren, first; Peggy Huston, Rawson, second.

Junior doe — Stephanie Beach, Arlington, first; Brad Beach, Arlington, second.

Best of breed — Donell Foust.

Best opposite — Stephanie Beach.

Meat pen of three winners:

Natalie Schaffer, Findlay, first; Andrew Siebeneck, Findlay, second.

Best of breed — Natalie Schaffer.

Dutch winners:

Senior buck, senior doe, junior buck, junior doe — Suzanne Wilch, Findlay, first and second.

Best of breed, best opposite — Suzanne Wilch.

Netherlands dwarfs winners:

Senior buck — Cameryn Clark, McComb, first; Cayla Collingwood, McComb, second.

Senior doe — Cameryn Clark, first; Darby Wilson, McComb, second.

Junior buck — Cameryn Clark.

Junior doe — Cameryn Clark, first and second.

Best of breed, best opposite — Cameryn Clark.

Mini lops winners:

Senior buck — Susan Rader, McComb, first; Cody Stillberger, Findlay, second.

Senior doe — Natalie Schaffer, Findlay, first; Teresa Schultz, Findlay, second.

Junior buck — Faith Manley, Findlay, first and second.

Junior doe — Cody Stillberger.

Best of breed — Natalie Schaffer.

Best opposite — Susan Rader.

Mini rex winners:

Senior buck — Olivia Crawford, Findlay, first; Ed Boutwell, Carey, second.

Senior doe — Olivia Crawford, first; Brittany Warren, Jenera, second.

Junior buck — Ed Boutwell, first; Cameryn Clark, McComb, second.

Junior doe — Olivia Crawford, first; Cameryn Clark, second.

Best of breed — Olivia Crawford.

Best opposite — Ed Boutwell.

Holland winners:

Senior buck — Larry Goedde, Findlay, first; Jacob Dillon, McComb, second.

Senior doe — Larry Goedde, first; Lydia Schaffer, Findlay, second.

Junior buck — Larry Goedde, first and second.

Junior doe — Larry Goedde, first; Jacob Dillon, second.

Best of breed, best opposite — Larry Goedde.

Silver Marten:

Junior doe and best of breed — Michelle Reigle, McComb.

Fuzzy lops winners:

Senior buck — Jacob Allen, Findlay.

Senior doe — Avery Holland, Bluffton, first; Jacob Allen, second.

Best of breed — Avery Holland.

Best opposite — Jacob Allen.

AOV fancy winners:

Senior buck — Taylor Allen, Findlay, first and second.

Senior doe — Ashton Beach, Arlington, first; Cameryn Clark, McComb, second.

Junior buck — Jennifer Paxton Graves, Mount Blanchard.

Junior doe — Katelyn Rader, McComb.

Best of breed — Ashton Beach.

Best opposite — Taylor Allen.

Best of show: New Zealand, Ed Boutwell, Carey.

Best opposite of show: Dutch, Suzanne Wilch, Findlay.

Saddle, horse and pony

Halter horses over 58 inches:

Yearling colts — Robert Brooks, Vanlue.

Mares 2 years and older, AQHA only — Robert Brooks, first; Kaitlyn Kniss, Findlay, second.

Mares 2 years and older, other breeds and grades — Brandy Smith, Findlay, first; Rae Lee, Findlay, second.

Geldings, AQHA only — Diane Harmon, Findlay, first; Erica Frantz, Bluffton, second.



Note: More fair results will be printed this week.

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Public Record

Docket

The following incidents were reported to the Findlay Police Department and the Hancock County Sheriff's Office:

Police Department

A parking lot was spray painted at 302 Lima Ave. on Tuesday.

A Findlay woman said Tuesday that her debit card had been used, without her consent, on the Internet.

Two persons were taken into custody on drug-related charges following a Tuesday traffic stop in the 2700 block of North Main Street.

A domestic disturbance was investigated at a Cherry Lane address Tuesday.

A male was caught Tuesday switching a bar code price sticker on a wrench at Menard's, 15110 Flag City Drive.

A boat and vehicle were scratched outside 633 Frazer St. on Tuesday.

An attempted break-in occurred in mid-August at 1908 Greystone Drive.

A female in a blue pickup truck departed Murphy USA Oil, 1161 W. Trenton Ave., without paying for $45 worth of fuel Tuesday.

A male, passed out in a Buick outside 1259 Crystal Glen Blvd., was charged with having a drug pipe and drug needle on Tuesday.

A mountain bike was taken outside 2100 Tiffin Ave. on Wednesday.

Two inebriated individuals were taken into custody following a Wednesday disturbance at Circle K, 100 Crystal Ave. One male was cited for criminal trespass while the second person was found to be wanted under a warrant.

Two autos were scratched outside 303 Washington St. on Wednesday and tires were punctured.

A Ford Contour was reported stolen Wednesday from 340 E. Hardin St.

Appliances and other items were missing from 816 Broad Ave. on Wednesday.

Sheriff's Office

A Thornwood Drive man was admonished Saturday for carrying a toy gun while complaining to a neighbor about her barking dog.

A Grand Rapids woman was arrested for assaulting a Bowling Green person Saturday at Pleasantview Campground.

A male urinated near a building at McComb Cemetery on Aug. 27.

A rock cracked a windshield of a Dodge at 17011 County Road 109 on Aug. 29. The person filing the complaint was found to be wanted under two warrants.

A laptop computer was pilfered from an office at Job Solution, County Road 140, on Aug. 30.

A property was egged Monday at 427 Nebraska Ave.

Rings were stolen during a break-in reported Tuesday at 23261 Township Road 214, Fostoria.

A drainage tile pipe was damaged by a rock along County Road 9, south of Ohio 12, on Aug. 27.

Two males, who initially had been wrestling, were involved in a Monday fight at 1017 E. Sandusky St.

Anyone with information about a crime can call Findlay/Hancock County Crimestoppers

between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. weekdays at (419) 425-TIPS, or visit the Web at www.

HancockCrimeStoppers.org.

Callers may remain anonymous.

Courthouse

Real Estate Transfers

Gerald J. Smith to Wendy L. Smith, Section 3, 2.003 acres, Pleasant Township.

Greg and Kimberly Lamb to Robert L. and Virginia I. Freeman, Lot 277, Hunters Creek 6th Subdivision, Findlay.

Feliza Flores to Saul I. and Rosalinda Flores, Section 15, 5.001 acres, Liberty Township.

Lisa A. Ball to Larry D. Manley and Cheryl M. Buckland, Lot 264, Hillcrest Estates 6th Addition, Liberty Township.

Kevin M. Seasly to Erikka L. Seasly, Lot 6223, Howard Addition, Findlay.

Paul D. and Starley Cannon to Robert D. Chiow II, Lot 420, Continuation of East Findlay Addition, Findlay.

Robert D. Chiow II to Kimela S. Taylor, Section 23, 1.273 acres, Marion Township.

Acadia Point Development to Joseph L. Bird, Unit 7732-20, Point at Brookstone Condo, Marion Township.

Todd A. and Michelle R. Shields to Joe L. and Elaine K. Mayberry, Lots 12894-12896, Harper Addition, Findlay.

Paul A. Chapin to Robert M. and Diana J. Shamp, Section 9, 2.168 acres, Liberty Township.

David L. and Janice S. Wilcox to Dan and Peggy A. Caudill, Lot 54, Beaches Addition, Vanlue.

Liberty Dold Farms Development Co. to Dold Homes, Lot 80, Liberty Dold Farms 4th Addition, Liberty Township.

Swati S. and Subhash Patel to Joshua D. and Jodi M. Cramer, Lot 145, Fox Run 4th Addition, Findlay.

Gemstone Enterprises and Dennis Vondrell to McClellan Family Investments, Lot 15931-15936, Findlay Heights Addition, Findlay.

Barbara A. and Daniel E. Mueller to Donanntha B. Thacker, Lot 20, Ranch Villa Subdivision, Findlay.

James W. and Diane E. Recob to Samuel Jr. and Linda T. McKinney, Lot 17507, South Park Addition, Findlay.

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