Wednesday, September 5th, 2007


Angry flood victims blast city officials
Two angry survivors of last month’s floods on Tuesday placed much of the blame on the shoulders of Findlay City Council members and Mayor Tony Iriti.
more >>
County's mosquito population soaring
If you feel like the life is being sucked out of you, here may be one of the reasons:
more >>
City playgrounds back in action
Most of Findlay's parks are OK to play in again.
more >>
More counties on disaster list
Hardin and Seneca counties have been added to the presidential disaster declaration as a result of severe storms and flooding, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Ohio Emergency Management Agency (Ohio EMA) announced Tuesday.
more >>
Businesses get flood recovery advice
From tax breaks to loans to scam warnings, local business owners were prepped Tuesday on how to recover from flood damage.
more >>
Agency closing service center
The American Red Cross will be closing its service center for flood victims at Owens Community College at 6 p.m. today.
more >>
Flood repairs approved
The Hancock County Commissioners on Tuesday authorized spending money for repairs to county bridges and buildings that were damaged by the flood.
more >>
More volunteers needed in flood recovery effort
OTTAWA — There is still a large need for volunteers to help flood victims in Putnam County, the Office of Public Safety reported.
more >>
Meetings slated to discuss flood-related legal issues
The legal aid offices of Advocates for Basic Legal Equality (ABLE) and Legal Aid of Western of Ohio, (LAWO), along with the Findlay-Hancock County Bar Association, will host a series of meetings for those affected by the flood and who are facing potential legal issues.
more >>
More Hancock fair winners
More results of competition at the Hancock County Fair, which ended this week:
more >>
Fostoria Council OKs catch basin project
FOSTORIA — Fostoria City Council approved an emergency ordinance to allow Safety-Service Director Bill Rains to seek bids for replacement of catch basins in the Linda View Addition, on the city's west side.
more >>
North Baltimore Council OKs hike in assessments
NORTH BALTIMORE — North Baltimore property owners will be paying more for assessments to fund things like electricity for village streetlights and tree trimming.
more >>
Flood may also inflict deep emotional wounds
Shock. Grief. Anxiety. Despair. Stress.
more >>
Public Record
Docket
more >>
Local News

Angry flood victims blast city officials

By JOHN GRABER

STAFF WRITER

Two angry survivors of last month’s floods on Tuesday placed much of the blame on the shoulders of Findlay City Council members and Mayor Tony Iriti.

Karen McFadden and Steed Dilgard, speaking at Tuesday’s city council meeting, said the elected officials contributed to the flood damage when they allowed construction and development in the flood plain.

McFadden blamed city leaders for not only allowing building in the flood plain, but also for not going back and changing the regulations to stop further construction there.

“You can sit there and say 'not me, not me,’ but none of you undid it ... You’re all responsible because you did nothing,” McFadden said.

What’s worse, she figures, is they are still planning on building up the flood plain with the Findlay Towne Center -- a $58 million project proposed by the Dallas-based Koll Development Co. and the local Shaw Group, an environmental cleanup firm, that is supposed to create a cultural corridor linking the University of Findlay with downtown.

“I don’t care about a cultural corridor,” McFadden said.

Dilgard took city leaders to task for things like failing to dredge the river and allowing the new Wal-Mart on U.S. 224 to be built in the flood plain.

“You destroyed my home,” Dilgard said. “You destroyed my family.”

He figures it was all done for the sake of protecting developers’ interests.

“It’s ruined my home because somebody had to get rich,” Dilgard said.

He accused city leaders of pandering to the interests of the select, wealthy few of the community.

“It’s time to think about the people of this town, whether they’re rich or poor,” he said.

Both McFadden and Dilgard conceded the storm was bad enough that the city would have flooded no matter what, but they both blamed city leaders’ actions, and inaction, for making the situation worse.

The Dilgards are no strangers to dealing with floods. Their home on East Main Cross Street was hit hard by last winter’s floods. They figure their home, which has been in the family for 36 years, took somewhere around $50,000 worth of damage back then, while their insurance company only cut them a check for around $16,000.

They hired a lawyer and refused to accept that check because they felt the payout was inadequate.

Now they fear the home has been totaled.

Worse still, they said their 12-year-old daughter has contracted a case of cryptosporidium -- a parasite usually found in contaminated water that eats the tiny follicles in a person’s digestive system, making the person susceptible to health problems -- which her mother blames on last winter’s flooding.

The girl will have to be on medication for the next couple of years because of the parasite, which at one point made her lose 26 pounds. Her mother, Lorri Dilgard, said the girl has since gained the weight back.

The city health department has not been able to document any illness that was definitely caused by last winter’s flooding.

“I feel bad for everyone who was just affected (by the latest flood) because we’ve got a nine-month jump on them,” Lorri Dilgard said after the council meeting. “For those people, this is a horrifying experience.”



2 buildings to be razed

Two city-owned buildings, the Findlay City Health Department at 445 Clinton Court, and the Anchor Community Center at 215 East St., will have to come down in the wake of last week’s flood.

Damage to the two buildings was just too extensive to repair, city officials said.

Council voted 9-0 on Tuesday to approve $300,000 to demolish those two buildings and repair several other flood-damaged city-owned buildings.

Buildings slated for repairs, like new carpet and drywall, include the cemetery/parks maintenance building, the old Parker Lumber building, the municipal building, the streets department building, and the water billing and distribution building.

Estimates put the damage to the health department building at $567,000, and damage to the Anchor Center, which has repeatedly flooded over the years, at $551,000.

The old Parker Lumber building is being considered as a possible new location for the city health department, but nothing has been decided yet, Findlay Service Director Mike Sobczyk said after the meeting.

Only the A-frame building portion of the city health department is actually coming down. The building next to it, which also housed health department offices, will be gutted and converted to a storage area.

Findlay City Auditor Robert Cole Sprague said after the meeting that total damage to city-owned property is probably going to come in somewhere around $5.5 million. That’s down considerably from last week’s estimates of somewhere between $20 million and $31 million.



Building code idea

One piece of legislation that was not on council’s agenda Tuesday was a residential building code for one-, two- and three-family buildings.

Mayor Iriti strongly urged council last week to consider creating a residential building code and tightening up the regulations governing building in the 100-year flood plain.

Council responded by requesting that legislation be prepared, but Iriti now wants to wait until the Sept. 18 council meeting so he can figure out exactly what changes should be made in the regulations governing building in the flood plain.

His flood task force will begin discussing that issue during its 1:30 p.m. meeting today.

State law requires any residential building code adopted by the city to mirror the state’s building code.

A residential building code has long been a source of contention in Findlay. City Council tried to enact residential building codes in 1980 and 1993, only to have voters repeal them both times by referendum.

More recently, an ad hoc committee appointed to investigate the need for a residential building code disbanded last March after spending a year on the subject without being able to come up with a recommendation other than to say the issue should be on the ballot so the voters could decide.

Commercial structures and buildings consisting of four or more residential units are covered by the state building code. Findlay currently pays Wood County about $200,000 a year to handle those inspections.

Contact staff writer John Graber at: (419) 427-8417 johngraber@thecourier.com

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County's mosquito population soaring

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

If you feel like the life is being sucked out of you, here may be one of the reasons:

There may be 10 times more mosquitoes in the air now than there were before the August flood.

At least that's what Hancock County Director of Environmental Health John Shoop estimated on Tuesday.

"It was pretty good until it started to rain," Shoop said of the mosquito count.

And when it did rain — and rain, and rain — the resulting flood helped hatch a mess of mosquitoes that the city of Findlay started battling over the weekend.

Hancock County doesn't have a mosquito sprayer, but the Findlay City Health Department has been spraying for mosquitoes already, said Craig Niese, the environmental services director at the city health department.

"We try to focus on areas where there's a high population of people," he said.

Shoop said that the county doesn't spray, so villages and townships in need of mosquito control normally contract with others to do it.

Niese said it's typical for mosquitoes to multiply after a flood — all the standing water attracts them and can help eggs hatch.

That's why it's hard to find an insect-free moment outside lately, Niese said, but he added that there's only so much a mosquito sprayer will be able to do.

"It won't eliminate every mosquito," he said.

The mosquitoes could, in fact, be with us until the first frost, he said.

Cold weather may help eliminate mosquitoes, but the first frost will kill them, he said.

A frost isn't likely for awhile, though.

Until then, Niese and Shoop both offered some tips to residents battling mosquitoes:

• To keep them from breeding around your house, clean out the gutters, eliminate standing water, change water in bird baths at least once a week, and cut high grass because mosquitoes burrow in high weeds.

• Keep screens on the windows tight.

• Put insect repellent on before leaving the house. Children should have insect repellent with no more than 10 percent DEET in it.

• Wear long sleeves and pants when going out at dawn or dusk.

• Mosquitoes are most active at dawn or dusk, so avoid going out at those times if possible.

• Insecticide "throw-ins" can be purchased at local department stores to put in standing water to kill mosquitoes.

West Nile Virus is not a major concern now, said Shoop.

"The mosquitoes out there are not the West Nile type as a whole," he said. Mostly, they're just pests, he said.

Niese agreed. He said that although this time of year West Nile cases do tend to increase, mosquitoes that carry the disease tend to be "container breeders," not the sort of mosquitoes that a flood brings.

Courier reporter John Graber contributed to this report.

Contact Staff Writer Michelle Reiter at:

(419) 427-8497

michellereiter@thecourier.com

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City playgrounds back in action

By JOHN GRABER

STAFF WRITER

Most of Findlay's parks are OK to play in again.

City employees and United Way volunteers have cleaned and disinfected all of the playground equipment at the various parks that flooded around town.

That includes the Fort Findlay playground equipment at Emory Adams Park and the picnic shelters at Riverside Park.

The best thing for cleaning the parks' grassy fields was to mow them and allow the sun's ultraviolet rays to kill off any germs lingering from floodwaters, Findlay Parks Director Lu Draper said state health officials told her.

That has been done, though Draper is asking people to stay clear of portions of Emory Adams Park and Rawson Park because of damage caused by the recent flooding.

Only about 25 percent of Emory Adams Park will be usable this fall, she said. Some kind of barrier identifying the off limits area should be up soon.

City officials chose to close off most of that park because "the fields took a pretty big hit and they have to be re-aerated" and seeded, Draper said.

Closing the fields has nothing to do with any contamination created by the flood debris that city crews piled there before taking the waste to the county landfill, she said.

The park is "not diseased or anything, it just took a really hard hit and we have to get it ready for spring," Draper said.

The debris pile was gone by Friday, in accordance with orders from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. A sand berm had been created around the pile, per OEPA's requirements.

Emory Adams Park was chosen as a staging area "mainly because it has a nice paved facility," Findlay Service Director Mike Sobczyk said.

The lower portion of Rawson Park, the portion with the softball field, is also off limits. The press box there will have to be demolished in the wake of the flooding. The upper portion of the park is open and safe to use.

Firestine Park, which is home to the disc golf course, is a bit soggy but open for use.

"Conditions will probably be better toward the end of the week, with more sunshine," Draper said.

Anyone using the city's parks should be careful around fencing, which may be heaved or left unsteady by the flooding, Draper said.

The pool season at Riverside Park was cut short because floodwaters destroyed the pumps and filtration system.

The Cube recreation center, which served as a Red Cross shelter, was untouched by the flooding. A Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative meeting is scheduled there for the weekend of Sept. 15-16, and then ice for the rink will be made immediately after that.

"It should be ready, if all goes well, by the 22nd," Draper said.



Flood trash pickup

In other flood-related news, Findlay city crews will continue picking up flood debris from people's curbs through Friday.

Flood trash drop-off locations will be established this weekend, and will be in operation through Sept. 13.

One location is already established at Cooper Field on Broad Avenue.

After Sept. 13, city residents will have to take their flood-related debris to the Hancock County landfill themselves.

A drop-off site for hazardous materials damaged in the flood — such as tires, electronics and paint — is currently located in the parking lot across from the city streets department, 330 N. Cory St.

Hancock County is holding an electronics and tire recycling day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the county Agricultural Service Center, located at 7868 County Road 140. You must be a county resident to use the drop-off point.

In another flood-related matter, somewhere between 250 and 400 headstones will need to be reset at Maple Grove Cemetery. Colden-Crates Funeral Home will do the work for free. Work is expected to take two to three weeks.

Contact staff writer John Graber at:

(419) 427-8417

johngraber@thecourier.com

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More counties on disaster list

Hardin and Seneca counties have been added to the presidential disaster declaration as a result of severe storms and flooding, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the Ohio Emergency Management Agency (Ohio EMA) announced Tuesday.

That means residents and business owners in those two counties are now eligible for FEMA's individual assistance, joining Allen, Crawford, Hancock, Putnam, Richland and Wyandot counties, which were designated in the original Aug. 27 disaster declaration.

The individual assistance program can help eligible applicants with grants for temporary housing, and repair or replacement of a homeowner's primary residence.

The program may also provide funds to help homeowners pay for losses and expenses caused by the disaster, including clothing, household items, cleanup materials, a primary vehicle, and equipment required for a job or educational purpose, as well as medical and dental costs, moving and storage expenses.

In addition, the Small Business Administration (SBA) provides low-interest, long-term disaster loans to homeowners, renters and businesses, and to private, nonprofit organizations that suffered damage to property and contents.

Those who suffered damage and losses from the severe storms and flooding are being encouraged to register online at www.fema.gov or call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or TTY 1-800-462-7585 for the hearing or speech-impaired. The toll-free numbers are available from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.

SBA representatives are located at all Disaster Recovery Centers to explain how SBA long-term, low-interest disaster loans can help. They also will meet with applicants and assist them in filling out and mailing loan applications.

A Disaster Recovery Center is located at the Cube in Findlay. Other centers are currently in Ottawa, Bluffton and Carey.

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Businesses get flood recovery advice

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

From tax breaks to loans to scam warnings, local business owners were prepped Tuesday on how to recover from flood damage.

The two-and-half-hour seminar presented by GreaterFindlayInc. included presentations by government and business leaders.

A summary of the flood recovery topics follows:

County tax break

Owners of businesses and homes damaged by the flood can get their property taxes reduced next year, Hancock County Auditor Charity Rauschenberg said.

Property owners can have the assessed value of the damaged portion of their property reduced by up to 50 percent.

Rauschenberg encouraged owners of damaged businesses and homes to apply for the reduction soon. That would allow the tax reduction to be applied when the first-half real property tax bills are mailed in January. Those who wait until near the Dec. 31 deadline to apply might not see the benefit until the second-half real property tax bills are mailed next June.

Applications can be obtained at the auditor's office in the Courthouse, or online at auditor.co.hancock.oh.us/. On the Web site, click on the auditor's seal, then in the left margin click on "DTE Forms." The needed form is "DTE Form 26."

For more information, call the county auditor's office at 419-424-7015.

City tax break

Some flooded-damaged properties are located in Findlay's "Community Reinvestment Areas," making the property owners eligible for tax breaks on repairs, improvements or rebuilding, Mayor Tony Iriti said.

Through the program, property taxes would be based on the pre-improvement values for a period of years.

The reinvestment area's boundary roughly extends from the intersection of West Lincoln Street and Western Avenue north to the Norfolk & Southern Railroad; then follows the railroad tracks in a northeasterly direction to Cory Street; then follows Cory Street north to Pine Avenue; then extends from Pine Avenue east to the CSX Railroad tracks, where it extends south to East Lincoln Street, and then extends west to Western Avenue.

Pre-improvement values would apply for 10 years for property taxes on single-family homes and duplexes with $2,500 worth of remodeling.

The pre-improvement values would apply for eight years on commercial, industrial properties, triplexes and apartment complexes with at least $5,000 worth of remodeling.

They would apply for four years for construction of every new structure — residential, commercial and industrial.

For more information, call the mayor's office at 419-424-7137.

Federal loans

Low-interest loans of up to $1.5 million are available to most flood-damaged businesses from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

Loan terms can be for up to 30 years with the recipient's first payment deferred for five months. The loans cover uninsured or under-insured losses.

Companies employing 250 or more workers may be eligible for loans larger than $1.5 million.

No federal grants are available to businesses for flood relief, and it is the SBA — not the Federal Emergency Management Agency — which will extend the loans to businesses.

Businesses are not required to register with FEMA to obtain a federal loan. SBA representatives are urging business owners suffering flood damage to apply for aid at their Disaster Recovery Center at The Cube, 3430 N. Main St.

SBA loans are for repair or replacement of real estate, inventories, machinery, equipment and other physical losses.

Loans also can be extended to help businesses which have sustained economic injury meet their necessary financial obligations for awhile.

The interest rate on the loans generally is 4 percent.

SBA Field Operations Officer Travis Brown urged business owners with flood damage to apply for an SBA loan.

Answering questions from the assembled business leaders, Brown said:

• Churches can get loans as nonprofit organizations.

• Landlords can get loans to help afford demolition, debris removal and rebuilding.

• Properties without flood insurance can get loans. But if the property is located in the flood plain, then the property owner must obtain flood insurance when he gets an SBA loan.

• It's not necessary to settle claims with an insurance company before applying for the SBA loan. Ultimately a loan will only be extended for uninsured losses.

• Properties outside the flood plain can get loans.

• Business owners can start repairing and replacing things without jeopardizing loan approval. Photos, construction contracts and invoices will be accepted as proof of need. An SBA loan can even be used to pay back a short-term loan from a bank.

• Loan approvals are made within 14 days of application. The funds can be available within a week, but that depends on the recipient filling out closing documents promptly.

State aid

Small businesses, agricultural enterprises and homeowners with flood damage can get the interest rate reduced on a bank loan to rebuild.

The Ohio Linked Deposit Program allows loan recipients to get the rate reduced by three percentage points for up to 24 months.

The Linked Deposit benefit can be combined with an SBA loan or FEMA grant. The program is offered through the Ohio treasurer's office.

More information can be obtained at 614-466-6546 or at www.ohiotreasurer.gov.

Revolving loan funds

Offered through the city of Findlay and Hancock County, the funds extend loans of up to $490,000. The lower-interest loans, derived from the federal and state governments, are offered with the expectation that they will add or retain one full-time job per $25,000 in funds.

Hancock Regional Planning Commission Director Bill Homka said that state rules require that businesses affected by the flood first must approach the SBA programs before trying the revolving loan funds.

Permits

Businesses need a permit to repair, remodel or rebuild after the flood, and the city and Wood County Building Inspector's Office are trying to issue the approvals as quickly as possible.

The city contracts with the Wood County office, in Bowling Green, to inspect commercial and industrial properties and apartment complexes.

The huge quantity of flood-damaged properties has left the city and Wood County Building Inspector's Office trying to catch up. Even things like replacing drywall, carpeting and subfloor require permits.

To try to speed approvals up, the Wood County Building Inspector's Office is temporarily keeping an office in the city Engineering Department. It can be reached at 419-424-7116.

In addition, properties in the flood plain also need a flood development permit from the city before they can make repairs, improvements or do reconstruction.

To apply for a permit from the city or the Wood County office, businesses need to show a damage estimate from an insurance adjuster, a licensed appraiser or estimates from two contractors.

Scam warning

Every time a disaster occurs, frauds and scam artists follow, Northwest Ohio Better Business Bureau (BBB) President Richard Eppstein said.

He urged local business owners to hire reputable local people to do their repairs.

If someone says he represents a local company, however, don't take his word for it, Eppstein warned. Check the license plates on his vehicle. Get references and ask friends, neighbors and GreaterFindlayInc. about the company.

"Some of this stuff is a hassle, but you need to do it," Eppstein said.

Make the company show proof of worker's compensation and liability insurance. Eppstein also urged local business owners to get a written agreement.

"You gotta have stuff in writing," he said.

The agreement should specifically list types of materials to be used and terms of payment.

"It's not easy to get them back after you've given them all the money," Eppstein said.

A written warranty also should be obtained.

By asking the right questions and documenting everything from promises to quality of workmanship, local businesses can put the BBB in a better position to help them.

The BBB offers remediation and arbitration services.

Eppstein also urged business owners who want to give to charities to stay with the reputable, well-known ones.

"Business people can be the biggest patsies in the world when it comes to phony charities," he said.

Contact staff writer Lou Wilin at:

(419) 427-8413

louwilin@thecourier.com

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Agency closing service center

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

The American Red Cross will be closing its service center for flood victims at Owens Community College at 6 p.m. today.

Individuals or families with a continuing need for additional assistance may call 1-866-GET INFO beginning Thursday at 9 a.m.

The hotline will connect disaster victims with personnel who can help provide them with temporary housing, food, clothing and replacements of prescription medicine and prosthetic devices lost in the flood, as well as referrals to other local and government resources.

Individuals or families must have some form of identification showing their pre-disaster address to prove they lived in the area affected by the disaster.

The American Red Cross on Tuesday also reported the following numbers related to flood relief efforts in Hancock County, as of Monday evening:

• 13 vehicles served mobile meals over the past two weeks.

• 229 health-related contacts were made by nurses with flood survivors for anything from flood-related injuries or illnesses to pre-existing health needs like lost medications, medical equipment, eyeglasses, dentures, and hearing aids.

• 212 people stayed at least one night at the emergency shelter at the Cube in Findlay.

• 773 was the cumulative total of overnight stays by the 212 people who were sheltered at the Cube.

• 840 people met with case workers who helped them arrange a stay at the shelter, meals, temporary housing, groceries, clothing or referrals to other agencies.

• 3,963 cleanup kits were distributed, including mops, brooms, buckets, bleach, sponges and gloves.

• 9,058 miscellaneous items were distributed, including rakes, dehumidifiers, toothpaste, toothbrushes and other toiletries.

• 19,400 meals were served at the shelter and around the community.

• 73,103 snacks were served.

Contact staff writer Lou Wilin at

(419) 427-8413

louwilin@thecourier.com

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Flood repairs approved

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

The Hancock County Commissioners on Tuesday authorized spending money for repairs to county bridges and buildings that were damaged by the flood.

The commissioners authorized spending almost $50,000 for repairs to a bridge on Township Road 31 over Eagle Creek, which was damaged by flooding.

That’s one of several bridges that were damaged. Hancock County Engineer Steve Wilson said that, so far, he has enough money in his budget to cover damages.

In the future the county hopes to receive federal help for the flood damage, but the commissioners are not sure whether they will qualify.

Other emergency contracts approved Tuesday include one for about $4,000 to remove a tin ceiling, painted with lead paint, from the county public defender’s office, which was damaged in the flood.

And a contract for no more than $3,500 was authorized to remove asbestos tiles from a county-owned building at 320 S. Main St., which is now vacant. The asbestos was discovered in the building’s flood damage.

That accounts for just some of the bills that are mounting as the county attempts to deal with the aftermath of the flood.

Another bill that will begin to add up is the $3,000 a month the county will be paying to lease the temporary modular units at the media building on West Main Cross Street.

Local government officials will meet with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) representatives at 8:30 a.m. today at the Hancock County Engineer’s Office on Lima Avenue, to discuss flood damage.

Local officials want to find out what they can do to try to recover flood costs -- or whether they can recover them.

Contact Staff Writer Michelle Reiter at: (419) 427-8497 michellereiter@thecourier.com

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More volunteers needed in flood recovery effort

OTTAWA — There is still a large need for volunteers to help flood victims in Putnam County, the Office of Public Safety reported.

The county office reported that the number of volunteers dropped off dramatically Tuesday.

People can contact the volunteer center at the Education Service Center near the YMCA off Ohio 109 on Parkway Plaza. The center is open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Potential volunteers also can call (419) 523-3288.

The Education Service Center is also serving as the site of the FEMA Disaster Recovery Center, and people affected by the flood must come to the recovery center to confirm registration information and check for other assistance. Its hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.

However, to be eligible for assistance through FEMA, flood victims must first register by calling 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or online at www.fema,gov. A total of 230 people in Putnam County have been processed by FEMA to date.

Also, the Small Business Administration will be at the Ottawa Chamber of Commerce meeting at 4 p.m. today at the Red Pig Inn to give business owners information on assistance.

The Red Cross reported Tuesday that no one is still living at the local Red Cross shelter, but there are several people in temporary housing. The Red Cross did provide 925 meals.

No clothing items are accepted at the center, but there is a need for buckets, cleaning supplies, non-perishable food and hygiene products.

Cash donations will be accepted.

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Meetings slated to discuss flood-related legal issues

The legal aid offices of Advocates for Basic Legal Equality (ABLE) and Legal Aid of Western of Ohio, (LAWO), along with the Findlay-Hancock County Bar Association, will host a series of meetings for those affected by the flood and who are facing potential legal issues.

The first session is scheduled for today from 3:30-6 p.m. in the legal aid offices of the Family Center, 1800 N. Blanchard St.

Topics can include legal rights concerning rent, mortgage payments, insurance and repairs.

Attorneys will be available for a brief consultation, including the review of insurance policies, leases and mortgage agreements.

Those who need full legal assistance from ABLE or LAWO will be assessed for eligibility, while others will be directed to community volunteer lawyers available on a pro bono basis.

Additional meetings will be announced.

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More Hancock fair winners

More results of competition at the Hancock County Fair, which ended this week:



Open class

Poultry

Bantam Division

Mille Fleur Belg d'Uccle winners:

Cock — Donald Brenamen, Fostoria, first; Emily Altvater, Findlay, second.

Hen — Emily Altvater, first; Donald Brenamen, second.

Cockerel — Olivia Altvater, Findlay, first; Emily Altvater, second.

Pullet — Emily Altvater, first; Olivia Altvater, second.

Best of breed — Emily Altvater.

AOV Bearded winners:

Cock, cockerel — Lance Brockschmidt, Risingsun, first; Aubrey Brown, Findlay, second.

Pullet — Aubrey Brown, first and second.

Black Silkies winners:

Cock — Tyler Lydick, Findlay.

Hen — Nathan Knicely, Findlay.

White Silkies winners:

Cock, hen — Cale Parkins, Pandora, first; Dustin Drake, Mount Gilead, second.

Cockerel, pullet — Dustin Drake.

Best of breed — Cale Parkins.

Quail Belg Beard d'Anuers winner:

Cock, hen, cockerel, pullet, best of breed — Riley Patterson, Arcadia.

Speckled Sussex winner:

Cock, hen, cockerel, pullet, best of breed — Dustin Drake.

Black Breasted Red Old English Game winner:

Hen — Cale Parkins, first and second.

White Old English Game winner:

Cock — Michael Schlumbohm, Leipsic.

Cockerel — Michael Schlumbohm, first and second.

AOV Old English Game winners:

Cock — Larry Lauger III, Findlay, first; Mazie Parkins, Pandora, second.

Hen — Mazie Parkins, first; Lance Brockschmidt, Risingsun, second.

Cockerel — Larry Lauger III, first; Lance Brockschmidt, second.

Pullet — Lance Brockschmidt.

Best of breed — Mazie Parkins.

AOV Bantam winners:

Cock, hen — Aubrey Brown, Findlay, first; Patricia Sampson, Mount Blanchard, second.

Cockerel, pullet — Aubrey Brown, first and second.

Heavy ducks

White Pekins winners:

Old drake — Donald Brenamen, Fostoria, first; Isaac Sampson, Mount Blanchard, second.

Old duck — William Hershner, Mount Gilead, first; Isaac Sampson, second.

Young drake, young duck, best of breed — William Hershner.

Rouen winners:

Old drake — Kaitlyn Smith, McComb, first; Dustin Drake, Mount Gilead, second.

Old duck — Dustin Drake, first; Kaitlyn Smith, second.

Young drake, young duck, best of breed — Dustin Drake.

White Muscovys winners:

Old duck — Isaac Sampson, first; Lance Brockschmidt, Risingsun, second.

Young duck — Lance Brockschmidt.

Colored Muscovys winner:

Old drake, old duck, young duck — Lance Brockschmidt.

Medium ducks

Blue Swedish winners:

Old drake, young drake, young duck, best of breed — William Hershner, Mount Gilead.

Old duck — Isaac Sampson, Mount Blanchard.

Black Cayugas winners:

Old drake, old duck — Dustin Drake, Mount Gilead.

Young drake — Isaac Sampson, first and second.

Best of breed — Isaac Sampson.

Buff winners:

Old drake, old duck — Kaitlyn Smith, McComb, first; William Hershner, second.

Young drake, young duck — William Hershner.

Best of breed — Kaitlyn Smith.

Silver Appleyard winner:

Old drake, old duck, young drake, young duck — Dustin Drake.

Saxony winners:

Old drake, old duck, young duck — William Hershner, first; Lacy Allen, second.

Young drake — Lacy Allen, first; William Hershner, second.

AOV duck winner:

Young drake, young duck — Riley Patterson, Arcadia.

Light ducks

Khaki Campbell winners:

Old drake — Lance Brockschmidt, Risingsun.

Young drake — Lacy Allen, Findlay, first; Lance Brockschmidt, second.

Young duck — Lacy Allen.

Chocolate Runner winner:

Old duck, young duck — Lance Brockschmidt.

White Runner winner:

Old drake, old duck, young drake, young duck — Lance Brockschmidt.

Black Runner winner:

Old drake, old duck, young drake, young duck, best of breed — Lance Brockschmidt.

AOV Runner winner:

Old drake — Isaac Sampson, Mount Blanchard, first and second.

Australian Spotted winners:

Old drake — Lacy Allen.

Old duck — Lacy Allen, first; Isaac Sampson, second.

Young drake — Lacy Allen, first; Brenden Fry, Findlay, second.

Young duck — Brenden Fry, first; Lacy Allen, second.

Welsh Harlequin winner:

Old duck — Isaac Sampson.

Bantam ducks

Blue Calls winner:

Old drake, old duck, young drake, young duck — Lance Brockschmidt, Risingsun.

Gray Calls winners:

Old drake, young drake, young duck, best of breed — Lance Brockschmidt.

Old duck — Lance Brockschmidt, first; Kaitlyn Smith, McComb, second.

Snowy Calls winners:

Old drake, old duck, young drake — Lance Brockschmidt.

Young duck — Lacy Allen, Findlay, first; Lance Brockschmidt, second.

White Calls winners:

Old drake — Brenden Fry, Findlay, first; Isaac Sampson, Mount Blanchard, second.

Old duck — Brenden Fry, first; Lance Brockschmidt, second.

Young duck — Lance Brockschmidt.

Black Calls winner:

Old drake, old duck, young drake, young duck — Lance Brockschmidt.

Patel Calls winners:

Old drake — Lance Brockschmidt, first; Kaitlyn Smith, second.

Old duck — Kaitlyn Smith, first; Lance Brockschmidt, second.

AOV Calls winner:

Old drake, old duck, young drake, young duck — Lance Brockschmidt.

Black East Indies winners:

Old drake — Dustin Drake, Mount Gilead, first; Lance Brockschmidt, second.

Old duck — Lance Brockschmidt, first; Dustin Drake, second.

Young drake, young duck — Lance Brockschmidt.

Mallard winners:

Old drake, old duck — Lacy Allen, first; Kaitlyn Smith, second.

Young duck, best of breed — Lacy Allen.

Snowy Mallard winners:

Old drake, old duck, young drake — Lacy Allen.

Young duck — Brenden Fry.

White Mallard winner:

Old drake, old duck, young drake, young duck — Lacy Allen.

Mandrin winner:

Old drake, old duck, best of breed — Riley Patterson, Arcadia.

Geese

Toulouse winners:

Old gander, old goose — Riley Patterson, Arcadia, first; Dustin Drake, Mount Gilead, second.

Young gander, best of breed — Dustin Drake.

Young goose — Dustin Drake, first; Donald Brenamen, Fostoria, second.

Buff Toulouse winners:

Old gander, old goose — Riley Patterson, first; William Hershner, Mount Gilead, second.

Young gander, young goose — William Hershner.

Emden winner:

Old gander, old goose, best of breed — Donald Brenamen.

African winners:

Old gander — Dustin Drake, first; Donald Brenamen, second.

Old goose — Kaitlyn Smith, McComb, first and second.

Young gander, young goose — Dustin Drake.

White African winner:

Old gander, old goose, best of breed — Kaitlyn Smith.

American Buff winners:

Old gander — William Hershner, first; Kaitlyn Smith, second.

Old goose — William Hershner, first; Shelby Blair, Findlay, second.

Young gander, young goose, best of breed — William Hershner.

Brouwan Chinese winner:

Old gander, old goose, young gander, young goose — Dustin Drake.

White Chinese winner:

Old gander, young gander, young goose, best of breed — William Hershner.

Egyptian winner:

Old gander — Riley Patterson.

AOV geese winners:

Old gander, old goose — Dustin Drake.

Young gander, young goose — Riley Patterson, first and second.

Turkeys

Nargansett winner:

Young tom — Michael Schlumbohm, Leipsic.

Royal Palm winners:

Old tom — Marshall Patterson, Findlay, first; Riley Patterson, Arcadia, second.

Best of breed — Marshall Patterson.

White winners:

Young tom — Becky Wolford, McComb, first; Jacob Fenstermaker, McComb, second.

AOV turkey winners:

Young tom — Tyler Brown, Van Buren, first; Jacob Brown, Van Buren, second.

Best of breed — Tyler Brown.

Pheasants

Golden winner:

Hen — Tamra Parkins, Mount Cory.

Cock — Tamra Parkins, first and second.



Baking, canning, candy

Special exhibit, decorated cakes and cookies:

Any birthday, any holiday, any special occasion — all Lacy Allen, Findlay.

Wedding — Anita Heisstand, Findlay, first; Emily Anderson, McComb, second.

Best of show — Lacy Allen.

Decorated cupcakes and cookies:

Cupcakes — Cheryl Stahl, Findlay, first; Emily Anderson, McComb, second.

Cookies — Robin Ridge, McComb, first; Cheryl Stahl, Findlay, second.

Best of show — Robin Ridge.

Semi-professional and professional decorated cakes and cookies:

Any birthday — Susan Wolford, Findlay, first; Chris Allen, Findlay, second.

Any shower — Andrea Kisseberth, Findlay.

Anniversary — Chris Allen.

Wedding — Andrea Kisseberth.

Decorated cupcakes — Susan Wolford.

Frosted decorated cookies — Susan Wolford, first; Cindy Lee Boyer, Findlay, second.

Best of show — Susan Wolford.

Youth exhibit, decorated cakes and cookies:

Decorated cookies, girls 9 and under — Alissa Rutherford, Jenera, first; Elizabeth Stahl, Findlay, second.

Decorated cookies, boys 9 and under — Brice Rutherford, Jenera.

Decorated cookies, girls 10 through 16 — Morgan Ridge, McComb, first; Sarah Neal, Arcadia, second.

Decorated marshmallows, girls 9 and under — Dana Desgranges, Mount Cory, first; Kylee Desgranges, Mount Cory, second.

Decorated marshmallows, boys 9 and under — Caleb Breece, Alvada, first; Forest Heistand, McComb, second.

Marshmallow creations, girls 10-16 — Kaleigh Frampton, Van Buren, first; Annie Talmadge, Findlay, second.

Marshmallow creations, boys 10-16 — Dakota Heistand, McComb.

Best of show — Kaleigh Frampton.

Gingerbread creations:

Traditional house, youth — Demiya Miller, Findlay, first; Tara Spahr, Findlay, second.

Other, youth — Tristen Spahr, Findlay, first; Noah Weaver, McComb, second.

Best of show — Tristen Spahr.

Butters:

Peach — Marcia Schwab, McComb, first; Jennifer Strapp, Findlay, second.

Apple — Karen Hassan, Mount Cory, first; Susan Barringer, Van Buren, second.

Grape — Marcia Schwab.

Best of show — Marcia Schwab.

Preserves:

Peach — Marcia Schwab, first; Bob Bingle, Jenera, second.

Pear — Bob Bingle.

Strawberry — Marcia Schwab.

Best of show — Marcia Schwab.

Jams:

Cherry — Tonita Altvater, Findlay, first; Kay Livingston, Arlington, second.

Peach — Marcia Schwab, McComb, first; Tonita Altvater, second.

Strawberry — Cheryl Conkle, McComb, first; Marcia Schwab, second.

Red raspberry — Tonita Altvater, first; Cindy Lee Boyer, Findlay, second.

Any other — Tonita Altvater, first; Susan Neal, Arcadia, second.

Best of show — Tonita Altvater.



Note: More fair results will be printed this week.

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Fostoria Council OKs catch basin project

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

FOSTORIA — Fostoria City Council approved an emergency ordinance to allow Safety-Service Director Bill Rains to seek bids for replacement of catch basins in the Linda View Addition, on the city's west side.

The project is estimated at about $60,000, according to City Engineer Dan Thornton and will include about a dozen catch basins and the necessary piping. The project is expected to begin this fall and should be completed prior to the 2008 street resurfacing program.

Council also gave second reading to a resolution which supports imposing higher taxes (five times the sales price) nationally on products manufactured by companies that have relocated to a foreign country in order to pay cheaper wages. The additional taxes would be distributed back to the localities which had workers displaced by the company's move, such as schools, townships and cities.

The resolution is part of a grassroots effort aimed at U.S. congressional members.

Council also agreed with a request by Council President Joe Droll to have a resolution drafted for the Sept. 18 council meeting seeking state investigation into instances of city employees retiring because of disability. Droll said the resolution will be sent to the governor, attorney general and all state legislators who represent the city.

He said he receives numerous questions about the employees retiring with disabilities, but didn't have any information to present Tuesday.

A letter of commendation was read by Mayor John Davoli for Tim Elchert, a city sewer maintenance department worker, who earlier this year was working when a nearby man stopped breathing and didn't have a pulse. Elchert performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on the man and kept him alive until an ambulance arrived and transported him to Fostoria Community Hospital.

Elchert had been trained in CPR at a previous job. Training of all city workers in CPR will continue over the next few weeks, Davoli said.

Meanwhile, mosquito spraying is continuing this week after public complaints about the excessive number of the pesky insects that have invaded the city, Rains told council.

City income tax receipts for July were $521,238, 31 percent higher than the same period last year and the third straight month, and fourth in the past five months, of higher receipts over last year.

It indicates more local residents are working, generally at smaller companies, and paying into the city tax coffers, Davoli said.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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North Baltimore Council OKs hike in assessments

By JOY BROWN

STAFF WRITER

NORTH BALTIMORE — North Baltimore property owners will be paying more for assessments to fund things like electricity for village streetlights and tree trimming.

Village council members passed emergency ordinances at their regular Tuesday meeting which increased such assessments due to cost surges.

The village will now be collecting $18,000 from property owners in order to trim, maintain and plant trees in town — a 260 percent increase from five years ago, according to council member Mike Julien.

Julien was the only council member who voted against that particular ordinance, claiming he has "a serious concern about" the cost increase. According to Julien, residents had been paying $10,000, with the village kicking in $5,000 for such services out of its general fund, but the cost is now being levied solely against landowners. "It's just too much. What they were paying five years ago was $5,000," Julien said.

Another ordinance increased the assessment for streetlights in the village by $5,000 to a total of $35,000.

A third ordinance was passed that renews the street cleaning assessment, but that assessment was not increased.

No mention was made at the council meeting about the village's ongoing internal investigation of its police department for alleged "inappropriate" activities, which began July 25 with North Baltimore Police Chief Gerald Perry II being placed on paid leave.

Village Administrator Kathy Healy, during a break in Tuesday's meeting, said the investigation is continuing. In fact, the village is receiving outside help — about three weeks ago it retained the services of "a retired police officer from the City of Toledo who has a consulting business," Healy said.

"We began taking sworn statements from certain employees and individuals" on Tuesday, Healy continued, "and we anticipate that within the next week and a half to two weeks, we should have news at that time about what our next step is going to be."

The investigation was sparked by a contentious July 3 council meeting at which two residents complained about the police department's handling of an alleged assault case.

Contact staff writer Joy Brown at:

(419) 427-8496

joybrown@thecourier.com

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Flood may also inflict deep emotional wounds

By SARA ARTHURS

Staff Writer

Shock. Grief. Anxiety. Despair. Stress.

If you're feeling any of these emotions in the wake of the recent flooding, you're not alone. A disaster like this one causes strong emotional reactions, which may at times be overwhelming, experts say.

Mary Miller, a retired psychotherapist, is volunteering her time as a counselor at Century Health to meet with people affected by the flood. She said just one person has taken advantage of the counseling she's offering so far, but she expects to hear from more.

Often, it takes a little while for the emotions to hit people, she said. People who were too busy to grieve while cleaning up immediately after the flood may find, a few weeks later, that their emotions are catching up with them.

Everyone reacts differently, Miller said, so there's no one right way to cope with the situation.

She said some people react with anger and others with anxiety. A common thread is "a lot of sadness."

Miller described her role as that of a listener, helping people talk through the experience.

The Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services (ADAMHS) board published an informational brochure on how to take care of yourself emotionally, and made it available at the Red Cross shelter at the Cube.

Top on the list is "stay calm," said Gary Bright, director of support and advocacy services at Century Health. And remember that things will get better — that the current stressful situation won't last forever.

He also advises people to "try to focus on family, friends, faith — those things that they do still have even though their physical possessions might not be there any more."

Having a support system of friends and family makes a big difference, Miller said. She said people benefit from having "somebody who'll listen to us, somebody we can cry with."

When you lose a lot of possessions, or your home, there is a grieving process just as in a divorce or the death of a loved one, Bright said. Most important, he said, is to talk about your feelings rather than keeping them bottled up. In a situation like the flood, there are many other people around who have been through the same thing and can relate, he said.

Bright said that it's important to remember that being emotional is a normal reaction to a stressful situation.

"It's this thing that they had no control over, and any normal person is going to experience some anxiety, some depression, some anger," Bright said.

Bright was at the Red Cross shelter at the Cube from Wednesday through Friday of the week the flood hit, talking with people staying at the shelter. He and other mental health workers tried to assess each person's state of mind.

It started with just talking to people, asking how they were doing. The first day, he said, it hadn't hit people yet.

"Some people were just glad to be out of the situation and be somewhere safe," he said.

By the time he returned Thursday, "the level of anxiety was a little bit higher," he said. People had gotten over the initial shock and were starting to think about everything they'd lost. Bright said the worst was the sense of a loss of control over what was happening — people felt helpless.

After doing general assessments on Wednesday, the mental health workers spoke in more detail with those who needed it on Thursday. By Friday, many people had had a chance to return to their homes and see what kind of damage they'd sustained. This brought on new grief and shock, Bright said, as people truly realized how much they had lost.

While you're in the thick of things, it's important to take breaks, he said. He noted that cleaning can be emotionally as well as physically exhausting. Take it in small chunks rather than all at once, he suggested.

When dealing with things like insurance it helps to keep organized, tracking receipts and keeping lists of phone numbers, Bright said. Being methodical about this can save additional stress, he said.

Parents of young children have the additional challenge of trying to keep them calm while the parents' own emotions are frazzled, Miller said. She said children may be scared and angry about what's happening.

And relationships with friends and neighbors may change as they, too, are dealing with a stressful situation, she said.

Bright added that it's important to pay attention to physical health by eating right and getting plenty of sleep.

Miller said she advises people to remember how they dealt with previous crises, such as a death in the family. Remembering the coping skills that worked then, and using them this time around, can help, she said.

Bright added that for people already prone to depression or other mental illnesses, an experience like the flood can trigger symptoms. Century Health is paying attention to existing clients with mental health issues who may have been affected by the flood, he said.

Miller said she's making herself available and hopes that people who can benefit take advantage of the fact she's there. Right now, people are still so busy cleaning up after the flood that the emotions may not have hit them yet.

"It's a big step for people to take, going into a counseling center," she said.

How do you know if you might benefit from counseling? Some sadness is normal, Bright said, but if your emotions are interfering with your everyday life such that you can't function it may be time to see a professional. He said there's no shame in seeking professional help — losing your possessions or your home can be traumatic, and it makes sense that you might need counseling to help you cope.

And Miller said the need for counseling will continue, since the emotions may hit people gradually rather than immediately.

"I think something we have to recognize is that the tough time may still be ahead," she said.

Need help? Century Health can be reached at (419) 425-5050.

Contact staff writer Sara Arthurs at

(419) 427-8494

saraarthurs@thecourier.com

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Public Record

Docket

The following incidents were reported to the Findlay Police Department and the Hancock County Sheriff's Office:

Police Department

A man wanted under a city warrant was nabbed while riding a bicycle Monday in the 800 block of South Blanchard Street.

Words were painted on an auto Monday at 530 W. Lincoln St.

A motorist, caught speeding in the 11000 block of County Road 95, was arrested for not having a license and having a drug pipe Tuesday. He also was wanted under a pair of city warrants.

A man — who struggled with a police officer Tuesday outside Towne Place Suites, 2501 Tiffin Ave. — ran from the scene but later turned himself in to authorities, who took him to jail under city warrants and also charged him with resisting arrest. A second male with him was incarcerated for having drugs in a room at the hotel.

Sheriff's Office

Someone on a go-cart apparently struck a food vending trailer at the Hancock County Fairgrounds on Saturday.

Two McComb residents were arrested for domestic violence after an altercation at a West Main Street house in the village Sunday.

Municipal Court

The following people were sentenced in Findlay Municipal Court:

Nona L. Coleman, 1033 W. Sandusky St., no operator's license (NOL); $35 fine.

Matthew R. Hartley, 1812 Morey Ave., NOL; $125 fine, 30 jail days suspended.

Tracy M. Mays, 613 W. Hardin St., sale to/use by underage person; $250 fine, 10 jail days.

George E. Moore Jr., 127 Taylor St., criminal trespass; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended.

Raymond A. Przedwiecki, 8397 Arapaho Drive, driving under suspension (DUS); $150 fine.

Kristopher D. Scott, 1233 Summit St., disorderly conduct, resisting arrest; $400 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended.

Steve A. Boyd, 1727 Bank St., NOL; $100 fine, 30 jail days suspended.

Casin D. Spero, New Riegel, operating a vehicle while under the influence (OVI); $250 fine, 30 jail days with 23 suspended, license suspended 181 days.

Philip J. Turner, Upper Sandusky, speed; $95 fine.

Mitchell D. Adams, 8221 Maplewood Drive, Roger Lee Rader, North Baltimore, Nicole M. Weber, 615 W. Sandusky St., all for speed; $105 fines.

Abigail M. Jacoby, Carey, operating a vehicle after underage consumption; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 19 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Joseph L. Loudenslager, rural Carey, OVI; $750 fine, 180 jail days with 160 suspended, license suspended 731 days.

David C. Olmstead, 524 E. Lincoln St., DUS; $350 fine, 90 jail days suspended.

George T. Baldridge, Findlay, violating a protection order, failure to maintain control of a vehicle; $400 fine, 30 jail days with 20 suspended.

Vernell Q. Barney, 1121 First St., speed; $100 fine.

Marissa R. Beer, 1832 Park St., sale to/use by underage person, possession of drug paraphernalia; $400 fine, 60 jail days with 50 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Betty J. Bovee, 613 Lawn St., wrongful entrustment; $150 fine, 10 jail days with five suspended.

David W. Brown, 532˝ S. Main St., 103, assault, disorderly conduct; $650 fine, 90 jail days.

Terry L. Burkmier, Fostoria, OVI; $350 fine, 30 jail days with 23 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

John P. Cheney, 505 Washington St., assault; $150 fine, 30 jail days with 20 suspended.

Lynn C. Dietrich, 229 N. Cory St., possession of drug paraphernalia, drug abuse; $400 fine, 30 jail days with 20 suspended, license suspended 181 days.

Eliot U. Emmons, 425 Monroe Ave., 23, falsification; $100 fine, 10 jail days with five suspended.

William E. Flugga Jr., 214 Clinton St., petty theft; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended.

Christopher S. Hoffman, rural Kenton, fictitious registration; $150 fine.

Kristen R. Hunt, Fostoria, unauthorized use of vehicle, drug abuse, operating a vehicle after underage consumption; $500 fine, 40 jail days with 33 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Chashauna L. James, 333 Sterling Hill Drive, petty theft; $250 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended.

Mike A. Kirkland, 613 Second St., NOL; $250 fine, 30 jail days.

Aja L. Knox, 411 Sterling Hill Drive, Apt. G, possession of drug paraphernalia, drug abuse; $400 fine, 30 jail days with 25 suspended, license suspended 181 days.

Gerald N. Owens Jr., 100 Smith St., DUS; $350 fine, 90 jail days with 20 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Scott A. Reuss, Cygnet, OVI; $750 fine, 60 jail days with 40 suspended, license suspended 731 days.

Isaac D. Sokol, 400 Winthrop Drive, Apt. 82, reckless operation of vehicle; $150 fine, 30 jail days with 27 suspended.

Diane L. Summers, 223 Jefferson St., DUS; $500 fine, 90 jail days.

Christian M. Taylor, Findlay, domestic violence, sale to/use by underage person; $325 fine, 60 jail days with 50 suspended.

Octavio Palacios Valdez, 208˝ E. Sandusky St., failure to stop after an accident, NOL; $410 fine.

Lisa Ward, 8198 Redwood Drive, OVI; $350 fine, 30 jail days with 23 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Jeremiah M. Dauterman, Fostoria, drug paraphernalia offense, drug abuse; $400 fine, 30 jail days with 20 suspended, license suspended 181 days.

Chelsea Jo Drennan, rural Carey, speed; $205 fine.

Lyn R. Lundquest, Weston, drug paraphernalia offense, reckless operation of vehicle; $500 fine, 60 jail days with 48 suspended, license suspended 181 days.

Lucas R. McCartney, 869 Washington Ave., drug paraphernalia offense, drug abuse, OVI; $800 fine, 60 jail days with 48 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Robert S. Paul III, 1314 S. Blanchard St., NOL, speed; $400 fine, 30 jail days with 20 suspended.

Gregory L. Stevens, 829 Hurd Ave., OVI; $350 fine, 30 jail days with 23 suspended, license suspended 366 days.

Courthouse

Marriage Licenses

Robert E. Calmus, 344 E. Lincoln St., public affairs, to Daniele E. Gustin, 342 E. Lincoln St., graphic designer.

John C. Anderson, Illinois, sales manager, to Jessica Ann Lawson, Illinois, business manager.

Real Estate Transfers

Albertine L. Smith to University of Findlay, Lot 6118, Howard Addition, Findlay.

Robert K. and Ann L. Spoon Elliott to John W. and Nancy C. Kirkwood, Section 5, 5.001 acres, Liberty Township.

Bank of New York Trust Co. and JP Morgan Chase Bank to Robert Ramirez and Darren Phillips, Lots 2826-2827, Shafer Addition, Findlay.

Dennis C. and Jeannette Mathern to Chris and Jamie Twining, Section 3, 4.817 acres, Liberty Township.

Harold A. and Melinda A. Hepfinger and Trust to Harold A. Hepfinger, Section 1, 1.2088 acres, Washington Township.

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