Friday, August 31st, 2007


FEMA opening centers in 5 counties
The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will open disaster recovery centers in Hancock, Putnam, Richland, Allen and Wyandot counties at noon today.
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Flood victims can salvage some soggy possessions, but not others
As flood victims in the Findlay area continue to sort through their soggy possessions, local health experts have some tips for them.
more >>
Anchor Center, several Findlay parks remain out of commission
Last week's flood has put a damper on Findlay's parks and recreation facilities.
more >>
Local judges will provide laborers for flood cleanup
Local nonprofit organizations in need of extra hands and a little muscle, due to flood damage, now have another source of manpower at their disposal: those sentenced to community service.
more >>
Officials move into new offices
Hancock County officials met with U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan on Thursday to discuss concerns, only touching briefly on the flood -- but it was hard to miss the fact that the county is still in the midst of flood recovery as the officials gathered on metal chairs in a temporary modular building in Dorney Plaza.
more >>
Ottawa-Glandorf to open Tuesday
OTTAWA — The Ottawa-Glandorf School District will open its doors on Tuesday, after delaying the start of the school year by only two days.
more >>
Back in Business
The following Findlay area businesses, closed by last week's flooding, have announced their reopening:
more >>
Church provides large volunteer source
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was busy Wednesday morning, full of volunteers from all over who have come to Findlay to help local residents clean up after the flood.
more >>
Ag Olympics: a welcome break
When most people think about heading to the fair, they think "Fun!"
more >>
Flood has little impact on fair entries
Months of caring for a 4-H or Future Farmers of America (FFA) livestock project, with the anticipation of showing the animal at the Hancock County Fair, turned to disappointment for a few youngsters this year because of last week's flood.
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Youngsters find safety in this danger zone
It's not all fun and games at the Hancock County Fair.
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Many winners named in fair contests
Second-day attendance at the Hancock County Fair was above average on Thursday, as cooler weather may have encouraged more people to visit the fairgrounds.
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Findlay Airport awarded $1.15 million federal grant
Four area airports will get more than $2 million in funding from the Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Sen. George Voinovich, R-Ohio, announced earlier this week.
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Ex-Findlay man indicted on two murder charges
BOWLING GREEN -- A former Findlay man has been indicted by a Wood County grand jury in connection with a fatal shooting of two men at a Perrysburg Township trucking company earlier this month.
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Local smoking violators fined
The two Veterans of Foreign Wars posts were the first organizations in Findlay to be fined for breaking the new statewide smoking law.
more >>
Holiday changes ad deadlines
The Courier won’t be published on Monday, in observance of the Labor Day holiday.
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Public Record
Docket
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Local News

FEMA opening centers in 5 counties

By JOHN GRABER

STAFF WRITER

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will open disaster recovery centers in Hancock, Putnam, Richland, Allen and Wyandot counties at noon today.

The center serving Hancock County will be located at the Cube, 3430 N. Main St. in Findlay.

Other area recovery centers will open at the following locations:

• Putnam County -- Putnam Education Center, 124 Putnam Parkway in Ottawa.

• Allen County -- Bluffton Baptist Church, 345 County Line Road, Bluffton.

• Wyandot County -- Wyandot County Solid Waste Recycling Center, 11329 County Highway 4, Carey.

Flood victims are being encouraged to register with FEMA before going to a disaster recovery center. They can register by calling FEMA at 1-800-621-FEMA (3362), or 1-800-462-7585 for the hearing impaired, between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. seven days a week, or by going online at any time to www.fema.gov.

When you call or go online, be sure to have a pen and paper ready to write down your FEMA registration number once it’s assigned to you.

Also, have at least one phone number where FEMA officials can reach you. If you have insurance information, that’s helpful. If you would like an electronic funds transfer, have a checking account number and a bank routing number ready.

Normal hours for the disaster recovery centers will be from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday (including Labor Day) and from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

“The centers are a great one-stop resource for all kinds of recovery info,” FEMA spokesman Randy Welch said. “They will include representatives from FEMA, the Small Business Administration (SBA), the Internal Revenue Service, the Ohio Emergency Management Agency, the state insurance commissioners office and other state agencies.”

Information available at the disaster recovery centers will include the status of your aid application, tips on how to rebuild safely, as well as expert tax and insurance advice.

Visitors can also meet face to face with SBA officials, who will assist in filling out applications for low-interest loans. Loans are available for private residents as well as business owners.

Interest rates typically run about 4 percent for business loans and 3 1/8 percent for private residents. The loans are designed to help those with no credit available elsewhere.

An SBA loan may be available in addition to a grant from FEMA.

“FEMA grants can help make your home livable, but SBA loans can help bring your home back to pre-disaster condition,” Welch said.

“As a simple example of that, (FEMA may) give you a grant so your floor is repaired, but the SBA may give you money for carpets and drapes.”

As of 5 p.m. Wednesday, some 3,072 households and businesses in Northwest Ohio had registered with FEMA, Welch said.

“We have been fairly surprised how fast people are registering,” Welch said.

He is also encouraging flood victims to call their insurance agents to get that process started as soon as possible.

If people want to start on repairs before a FEMA damage inspector visits, they should be sure to take pictures or video footage of the damage.

Flood victims are also being encouraged to save their receipts for all flood-related expenses, such as temporary lodging, replacement furniture, food, cleaning supplies or cleaning services.



Findlay developments

Certified building inspectors on Thursday checked 260 buildings in Findlay that had flooded, and many of the structures showed signs that their electrical boxes had been underwater.

The inspectors are stressing that if an electrical box has been underwater, it should be replaced, rather than repaired, for safety reasons.

Meanwhile, city crews are continuing their cleanup efforts.

A dropoff site for hazardous materials that were damaged in the flood -- such as tires, electronics and paint thinner -- is located in the parking lot across from the city streets department, 330 N. Cory St.

Hazardous household materials should be placed on the skids there. Separate, clearly marked dumpsters will also be available for tires and electronics.

The Hancock County Landfill took in about 1,700 tons of flood waste per day Tuesday and Wednesday. On Monday it took in about 1,500 tons.

“Just to give you a reference point, during normal periods our average daily intake is between 450 and 500 tons,” Hancock County Engineer Steve Wilson said.

The landfill will be open today and Saturday, but will be closed Sunday and Monday because of the Labor Day holiday.

Wilson is asking private citizens to leave their trash on the side of the curb for pickup, rather than taking it out to the landfill themselves.

“We’ve got a lot of trucks coming in (to the landfill) and if we can reduce the number of individuals, that will make the process as fast as possible,” Wilson said.



Natural gas

Meanwhile, about 680 homes in Findlay are still without natural gas service. Columbia Gas employees are working to restore service on a first-call, first-served basis.

Customers may call the company’s emergency phone number at 1-800-344-4077 to report an emergency or schedule an appointment to have service restored.



Red Cross

The American Red Cross has committed $1.7 million to its flood response efforts in Northwest Ohio. So far, that breaks down into:

• Nearly 9,000 meals and 20,000 snacks have been served.

• More than 3,700 cleanup kits have been distributed to residents.

• 2,500 bulk items, like cases of water, have been given out.

• A total of 16 Red Cross emergency response vehicles have provided mobile feeding and distributed cleanup kits and other supplies through the hardest hit neighborhoods.

• More than 900 overnight stays have been recorded in Red Cross emergency shelters.

• Red Cross nurses and mental health professionals have provided care to more than 1,000 individuals.

• There are currently 300 Red Cross workers and two emergency shelters continuing to operate in affected areas.

Volunteers are still processing people affected by the flooding at the Red Cross service center located at Owens Community College, 3200 Bright Road. People can go there between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. seven days a week to address some of their immediate needs.

Bottled water and cleaning kits are also still being offered at the Cube, 3430 N. Main St. Dinner and lunch is also being served at the Cube “for anyone who wants to take a break from cleaning their homes for a hot meal,” Red Cross spokeswoman Lynn Cook said.

Red Cross officials are asking that financial contributions be mailed to 125 Fair St., Findlay, OH 45840. Be sure to write the words, “North Central Ohio Floods” in the memo section of the check.



Food pantry

The Findlay Evangelical Free Church and Christians Helping Other People In Need (CHOPIN Hall) will be distributing 15,000 pounds of food in the church parking lot, located at 2515 Heatherwood Drive by the little red schoolhouse, on Sept. 8.

“Normally we do 10,000 pounds but the church took the initiative because of the flood to ratchet it up,” CHOPIN Hall Director Julie Brown said.

The event will begin at 9:30 a.m. and will go until the food runs out. Anyone is eligible.

“All you have to do is show up,” Brown said.

Contact staff writer John Graber at: (419) 427-8417 johngraber@thecourier.com

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Flood victims can salvage some soggy possessions, but not others

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

As flood victims in the Findlay area continue to sort through their soggy possessions, local health experts have some tips for them.

For one thing, everything that was touched by floodwaters does not have to be thrown away.

"Anything with a hard surface could be washed and disinfected," said John Shoop, the Hancock County Health Department's environmental director.

Tables and other hard surfaces can be wiped down and disinfected. Dishes can be washed and sanitized as well.

Clothing can be — and should be — washed following a flood.



What to discard

But people need to throw away whatever can't be easily washed and disinfected in a cost-effective manner, Shoop said.

That would include carpeting, carpet padding, upholstered furniture, mattresses, rugs, cosmetics, stuffed animals, baby toys, pillows, anything made of foam rubber, books, wall coverings, and most paper products.

Other items that should be discarded include drywall and insulation that has been contaminated with sewage or floodwaters, and food that was not in a waterproof container.

A waterproof container includes screw-caps, snap lids, pull tops and crimped caps.

Any food stored in a cardboard container, including juice, milk and baby formula, should be discarded if floodwaters touched the container.

Food in damaged cans also should be discarded.

Undamaged canned foods can be saved if labels are discarded and the cans are washed and sanitized.

A food can should be sanitized by placing it in a freshly-made solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of unscented liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water for 15 minutes. The can should then be air-dried for at least an hour.



What to wash

Shoop said to wash any hard surface, like tables. Countertops, metal pans, ceramic dishes and utensils can also be washed with soap and water, using hot water if available.

Dishes can be rinsed and sanitized in a solution of one tablespoon of unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of drinking water and allowed to air dry.

Heirlooms like family photos might be salvaged, but the items need to be freeze-dried in a process that is normally handled by professionals.

It's possible to save furniture with upholstery, but the cost sometimes rivals the worth of the piece of furniture.

Tom Davis, also from the county health department, added that people need to be careful with bleach, for the sake of their health and for the sake of the belongings they're trying to save.

"People think stronger is better," Davis said. "But too strong a solution can damage things too."

For more specific cleanup guidelines, go to http://www.extension.iastate.edu/disasterrecovery/flood.htm.



Handling debris

Anyone handling flood-saturated debris should be careful, Shoop said — and that includes garbage haulers and scavengers.

"The main risk there would be tetanus, or a puncture," he said.

Those who handle these items should get a tetanus shot, he added. Garbage handlers should be careful, but as long as they wash after handling debris and get a tetanus shot if necessary — especially in the case of a puncture — they should be safe.

For those scavenging the debris at the curb — and plenty of people are — some items are safe to take if they can be sanitized. Safe items include hard surfaces and anything that can be washed.



Mold

Mold continues to be a concern, as it flourishes in damp environments. Anyone whose house has not dried out yet should be wary of mold growths, which can cause stuffy noses, sneezing, red eyes, difficulty breathing, shortness of breath and asthma attacks.

Contact Staff Writer Michelle Reiter at:

(419) 427-8497

michellereiter@thecourier.com

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Anchor Center, several Findlay parks remain out of commission

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

Last week's flood has put a damper on Findlay's parks and recreation facilities.

The Anchor Center at 215 East St., a community facility which is rented for activities by various groups, was extensively damaged in the flood. As a result, the facility is closed and will remain shuttered for the next month or two.

City officials will then decide on the future of the building.

Pat Wright, office manager for the Parks and Recreation Department, said office personnel are informing renters and groups which regularly use the Anchor Center about the situation. Employees are trying to find alternative sites.

Also, the floodwaters have shut down all city park playing fields that were covered with standing water, including Emory Adams Park, Cooper Field, Rawson Park and Firestine Park.

Emory Adams Park and Cooper Field are the two sites where flood trash, collected from throughout the city, has been taken until it can be moved to the county landfill.

Riverside Park suffered floodwater damage, too, but the softball diamond there was spared and a women's league recently completed their softball tournament at the site.

However, the swimming pool sustained damage in the flood and has been closed for the season.

By the middle of next week, local officials will check various park locations for potential contaminants.

If there are sunny days and mowing can be done on the grass portions of the fields, that should assist in eliminating any problem, Wright said, since the sun and the mowing help to kill off contaminants left by floodwater.

Soccer leagues were expected to start the fall season soon, but have not been able to use soccer fields at various locations throughout the city. Those fields will be inspected next week.

Officials with the Hancock Soccer Association have been cooperative, Wright said. In the meantime, teams are practicing at other locations.

Also, the Parks and Recreation Department, in cooperation with the city, is considering construction of temporary fields on land adjacent to the Cube, 3430 N. Main St., the site of the recreation offices.

Playgrounds at various sites around the city have been closed, too, with bright yellow "caution" tape put around the structures until they can be cleaned and sanitized.

Anyone with questions, or anyone who needs additional information should contact the Parks and Recreation Department at 419-424-7176.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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Local judges will provide laborers for flood cleanup

By J. STEVEN DILLON

STAFF WRITER

Local nonprofit organizations in need of extra hands and a little muscle, due to flood damage, now have another source of manpower at their disposal: those sentenced to community service.

Findlay Municipal Court Judges Kevin Smith and Bob Fry announced Thursday that they are expanding the court’s community service program in order to allow governmental and nonprofit agencies access to help to assist with flood cleanup.

“We know the need is out there, and we have the people assigned to community service,” Judge Smith said. “Now, we just have to match the need to the manpower we have available.”

Those convicted of many misdemeanor crimes are often sentenced to community service as opposed to serving time in the county jail or at the Rehabilitation and Opportunity Center.

The court also allows some offenders to work off fines and court costs by serving community service.

In 2006 alone, 18,000 community service hours were imposed through the court. Many offenders serve their community service at places like Litter Landing, Goodwill, and the city street and maintenance departments.

Smith and Fry said they had planned to expand the community service program this year anyway, but last week’s flood made the timing right to implement the change now.

“We have a lot of folks on community service,” Fry said. “With all the flood-related cleanup that needs to be done, we felt this was the time to do it.”

The court’s program will work like this: nonprofits or governmental agencies who are in need of people for physical labor should contact the court’s compliance officer, Denise May, at 419-424-7451 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Meanwhile, those people who have been sentenced to community service who still have hours to serve, should also contact May at the same number to sign up for a work detail.

May will then match up the requests for help with the available workers.

Smith said the court plans to continue to make community service workers available to local agencies which need assistance in coming months.

Contact Staff Writer Steve Dillon at: (419) 427-8423 stevedillon@thecourier.com

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Officials move into new offices

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

Hancock County officials met with U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan on Thursday to discuss concerns, only touching briefly on the flood -- but it was hard to miss the fact that the county is still in the midst of flood recovery as the officials gathered on metal chairs in a temporary modular building in Dorney Plaza.

County Commissioner Ed Ingold told Jordan that most of the county office buildings affected by last week’s flood were ones the county had been considering scrapping.

“We’re looking at having to put more money into junk buildings,” Ingold told the congressman, adding that the county could be looking for opportunities to build a new building, if there are any.

Meanwhile, the temporary modular units are slowly becoming livable. CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) is getting situated in one, and the commissioners are settling into another. More are on the way.

But no one should get too comfortable.

“Before the snow flies I have to have everyone back in their offices,” Ingold said Thursday at the regular commissioners’ meeting.

Some extra expenses will undoubtedly crop up, like the asbestos that was discovered in the flooring in the 320 S. Main St. building, which recently housed Hancock Regional Planning Commission. Taking care of that could be costly, and Ingold warned others involved in cleaning their offices to look out for it.



Bridges

Hancock County Engineer Steve Wilson said Thursday that the bridge on East Main Cross, which has been closed due to flood damage, has been moved up on the list of federal highway funding projects.

However, “it could be a year until that bridge is open to traffic,” Wilson said.

It could have been longer, he added, had it not already been slated for replacement with federal highway funds.

He also noted that County Road 9 should be open by today.



Flood help

County Commissioner Emily Walton said the county’s flood assistance line -- 419-423-1432 -- has provided help to many local people in need already, and the elderly and disabled are taking priority.

She said there are still about 30 people in the Red Cross shelter at the Cube, and she said many of the remaining people are probably homeless. Red Cross shelter workers are attempting to work with those people to find them more help in the community.

Contact Staff Writer Michelle Reiter at: (419) 427-8497 michellereiter@thecourier.com

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Ottawa-Glandorf to open Tuesday

OTTAWA — The Ottawa-Glandorf School District will open its doors on Tuesday, after delaying the start of the school year by only two days.

School was supposed to start for the Titans on Thursday, but after the flooding of Aug. 21-22, Superintendent Kevin Brinkman said it became "evident" that the school year would have to be delayed.

"Many children from the Ottawa-Glandorf School District are still without an adequate place to live and are simply not ready to come back to school. Many teachers and staff members have also suffered a great loss in this disaster," said Brinkman, in a statement posted on the district's Web site announcing the delay.

Brinkman said Ottawa Elementary School, 751 E. Fourth St., received the most damage, but most of the flooding was contained in the Fourth Street gym area. He said two locker rooms, the coach's office and a storage room received heavy flooding. He said a professional cleaning company was hired to remove all the dirt and to prevent bacteria and mold from growing.

Brinkman said the school district was fortunate. In the weeks ahead, Ottawa-Glandorf plans to use that good fortune by opening its doors to students from Sts. Peter & Paul Catholic School. The parochial school, 320 N. Locust St., was heavily damaged in the flood. Students from Sts. Peter & Paul will attend school at Ottawa-Glandorf until their school is clean and safe, Brinkman said.



Waste dropoff

Household hazardous waste can be dropped off today and Saturday at the old Phillips plant parking lot on Pratt Street.

Only residents affected by the flood may drop off the materials. The site will be manned by personnel who will sort the materials into segregated containers. There will be a $1 donation for tires.

Hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. today and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday.

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Back in Business

The following Findlay area businesses, closed by last week's flooding, have announced their reopening:

• Cavins Kitchen Village, 215 S. Main St.

• Disabled American Veterans, Buddy Chapter 43, 201 E. Front St.

• Hair After, 414 E. Sandusky St.

• Hair Studio Salon and Spa, 622 E. Sandusky St.

• House of Awards and Sports, 419 N. Main St.

• Jim's Trophies and Screen Printing, 701 Howard St.

• Lee's Famous Recipe Chicken, 427 Tiffin Ave., taking orders through the drive-through and by carryout only.

• Masterson's ACE Hardware, 10205 U.S. 224 West.

• Ottawa branch office of ERA Noakes-Rooney & Associates, temporarily at 819 N. Locust, Suite 1, Ottawa.

• Oxley, Malone, Hollister, O'Malley & Warren law firm temporarily located at 6566 County Road 236.

• Suntime Professional Auto Detailing is now operating at 1043 Bright Road, in the rear building of Gene Stevens Honda.

• The Alteration Shop & In-Stitches Monogramming, 303 E. Sandusky St.

The Courier is asking businesses that have reopened after the flood to please e-mail the Courier's business reporter, Lou Wilin, at louwilin@thecourier.com; or e-mail news@thecourier.com; or drop off a note for Wilin at the Courier's newsroom. Tell us the name of your business, and your address.

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Church provides large volunteer source

By SARA ARTHURS

Staff Writer

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was busy Wednesday morning, full of volunteers from all over who have come to Findlay to help local residents clean up after the flood.

The volunteers are mostly young people, age 19 to 21, who are serving as missionaries in Ohio. But although they work as missionaries, this week is all about helping clean up — no proselytizing.

"They're specifically asked not to," said church member Steven Rackley.

The church is working with the United Way, which is assigning them houses to visit. They're targeting the poor, the uninsured and the elderly, "people that have nowhere else to turn," Rackley said.

Some stayed in Findlay to work, but several dozen volunteers headed to Ottawa to clean, starting on Tuesday.

Rackley noted that they're working with other churches in Ottawa, and that the cleanup effort goes beyond just the Mormon faith.

"This is a community-based effort," he said.

Elder Brent Beals of Phoenix, Ariz., is serving as a missionary in Findlay. He said he has enjoyed meeting other volunteers from all over.

"It's wonderful to see, in a time of need, everyone can unite for the cause," he said.

Sister Stephanie Eves was assigned to Ottawa. Eves, a native of Hurricane, Utah, said she was impressed with the people she met in Ottawa.

"It's amazing to see how open they are," she said.

Sister Lisa Bankhead of Wellsville, Utah, said she and the other volunteers were trying to spread good cheer as well as help cleaning up trash.

"I think it's sometimes good to see a smiling face," she said.

Eves said it seemed to help people to have someone to talk to.

Dave Morrow, who is in charge of training the volunteers, said the first thing he teaches them is to practice care and compassion.

"These people have been devastated," he said. "Their homes have been violated."

Volunteers, he said, need to "watch for the emotion and respond to it."

Beals was one of the volunteers assigned to Ottawa, which he said was an emotional scene. For the volunteers, the items they're hauling may just look like trash, but to the residents they're much more.

"You're moving their personal belongings, some cherished possessions," he said.

Training also included education on safety. Volunteers learned how to lift items carefully without injuring themselves, and how to avoid disease from sewage and contaminated water. Morrow said volunteers in one house found fish swimming in the basement. Volunteers were required to get tetanus shots.

Morrow said he teaches the volunteers to respect homeowners' privacy, and not to go beyond what they're asked to do.

"They are only to do the work that the homeowner asks," he said.

And he emphasized that the volunteers were not to push their religious views on others.

"We're out here to serve our fellow brothers and sisters," he said.

The volunteers wore yellow T-shirts with the words "Helping Hands," a reference to the interdenominational volunteer effort they're participating in. With fears of scam artists out there, Morrow said, it's important that they identify themselves clearly.

The church received four truckloads of supplies to distribute: 7,500 cleanup kits with items like bleach, 4,000 hygiene kits and countless boxes of non-perishable food like tuna and peanut butter and jelly. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Salt Lake City provided the supplies. Rackley said local Bishop Vince Jones was in touch with the church in Utah early in the crisis.

Outside the church, rows of mops and shovels were laid out, ready for volunteers to grab.

About 150 volunteers were on the scene by Wednesday, with another 250 or more expected to arrive by the weekend. Those volunteers will include people of all ages from throughout Ohio.

The young men were camped on the floor of the local Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The young women were being hosted in the homes of church members.

Eves said the motivation behind her work and that of the other volunteers was simple: "Just a love for people, love for the savior."

Karen Eckle, director of public affairs for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in the northwest Ohio area, said church members have previously donated to efforts such as the Hurricane Katrina relief.

"The church has had many opportunities to give aid during crises such as this one all over the world," she said. "While we wish there weren't any here in northwest Ohio, we are really grateful for the opportunity that we as church members have to serve locally. ...We're just happy to be able to help."

Rackley recommended that people who need help with the cleanup call the United Way, which is assigning volunteers to homes. That number is (419) 423-1432.

Contact staff writer Sara Arthurs at

(419) 427-8494

saraarthurs@thecourier.com

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Ag Olympics: a welcome break

By DENISE GRANT

Staff Writer

When most people think about heading to the fair, they think "Fun!"

But most times when members of the junior fair head off to those fairgrounds, they mean business. Most have already been working for months on their projects for the fair, and there is still a lot of work to be done. They enjoy the work, but what does a kid do to have a little fun at the fair?

The answer on Thursday was: Ag Olympics.

It's a new idea by the Hancock County Junior Fair Board, and it looks like a winner. Watching the "Ag Olympians", it was hard to tell whether it was more fun to watch or participate.

Becky Wolford, the 2007 Beef Queen, was in charge of the event on Thursday.

"For the junior fair kids, this may be the only time they don't have to water the animals or do other work. It's time to play in the dirt and see what happens," Wolford said.

The event, held Thursday evening in the grandstand at the fairgrounds, had plenty of dirt — and lots of smiles from the junior fair members and the crowd that came to watch them.

About 65 junior fair kids responded to the challenges, even when it involved mini-tractors and a fake cow.

In the mini-tractor rodeo, Ag Olympians were asked to spin themselves dizzy, then make their way to a hay bale, jump the bale and then steer a mini-tractor out several feet — then back several feet — in a sort of farm-style relay race. It must have been harder than it looked. The kids pedaled, pushed and some even carried the tiny yellow and green tractors across the finish line. A tie was settled with a round of "rock, paper, scissors."

Wolford said the first Ag Olympics was held last year. She said entries in the junior fair's talent show were dwindling, and the board wanted an event just for fun.

There was also a balloon toss and a tug of war, with members competing in teams of four or five.

The Ag Olympics also included a cow-milking competition, but no real cow was used in the event. A wooden cow, with a five-gallon bucket and baby bottle nipples, was center stage for the event.

"We give them a real milking stool to sit on," said Wolford, as she watch a long line of junior fair kids competing in a huge balloon toss.

"The adults have all the concerts and shows that they can attend; we wanted to give the kids something more to do. Something fun that they could do," said Wolford.

Contact staff writer Denise Grant at:

(419) 427-8412

denisegrant@thecourier.com

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Flood has little impact on fair entries

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

Months of caring for a 4-H or Future Farmers of America (FFA) livestock project, with the anticipation of showing the animal at the Hancock County Fair, turned to disappointment for a few youngsters this year because of last week's flood.

But it could have been a lot worse.

Several dairy feeder cattle and a few goats couldn't be brought to the Old Millstream Fairgrounds this year because they had been exposed to floodwaters and became sick, but the number of hogs and cattle registered at the fair are comparable to previous years.

For instance, there were 188 hogs and 184 dairy feeder cattle registered during Tuesday's weigh-in, according to Susan Russell, a 4-H educator who's in charge of the junior fair livestock program at the fair.

Following last week's flood, volunteers — including many 4-H and FFA members — converged on the fairgrounds to scrub, clean and sanitize the facilities to make sure animals brought to the fairgrounds, along with the youngsters and visitors, would be safe from contamination.

Veterinarians are keeping a close watch on the animals in all the buildings throughout the six-day run of the fair, Russell said.

Besides hogs and dairy cattle, there are chickens, cattle, lambs, rabbits, steers and turkeys shown at the annual event.

When animals were brought to the fairgrounds this week, veterinarians were on hand to check any livestock on medication, Russell said. Any sick animals were not allowed on the fairgrounds.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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Youngsters find safety in this danger zone

By JEANNIE WILEY WOLF

Staff Writer

It's not all fun and games at the Hancock County Fair.

If you visit the Danger Zone, you may also learn a thing or two.

Presented by a coalition of local agencies and corporations, the interactive safety fair features eight educational stations where participants learn ways to stay safe around home, school and the farm.

Danger Zone can be found in the big yellow tent next to the education building on Sept. 1 from noon to 6 p.m. and Sept. 2 from 2-6 p.m. Admission is free. However, participants must arrive by 5 p.m. to complete the entire course.

"It's all about safety," said Barbara Brahm, extension educator, family and consumer sciences and community development for OSU Extension, who helped organize the event.

"I keep saying to everybody, 'Do you want to do this again?' And they say, 'Oh yes.' They just feel if one child's life is saved, it's worth it," she said.

The fair is geared toward children ages 5-12. However, parents and children of all ages are encouraged to participate.

Topics change yearly, according to Brahm. This year's stations will include: choking, presented by the American Red Cross; drug safety, Hancock County ADAMHS Board, Community Partnership and St. Andrew's United Methodist Church Youth; lawn mower safety, Hancock County Farm Bureau; dog safety, K-9 Best Friends 4-H Club; gun safety, Hancock County Sheriff's Office; bike and skateboard safety, Findlay Police Department; and electrical safety, Hancock-Wood Electric Cooperative.

In addition, a 911 simulation will be offered by State Farm Insurance, and there will be appearances by McGruff the Crime Dog, and Vince and Larry, the Crash Dummies. Parents are also invited to visit special displays on insect safety and sun safety with Dermascan, a device that uses ultraviolet (UV) light to show sun damage.

Once a child is registered, older 4-H members will lead groups of children around to each station. Those who visit all eight stations receive an educational packet and are eligible for prizes, including bicycles, T-shirts and flyers.

Children like the prizes, Brahm said, but parents are also enthusiastic. One of their favorite attractions is the fire house — a small trailer where children can practice a safe exit in the event of a fire.

"We try to make all of these interactive as much as we can," Brahm explained. "The parents want their kids to go through the fire house. That's a key drawing card. They want their kids to know these things. And the parents, they tell us they learn things, too."

Danger Zone, which debuted at the Hancock County Fair in 1996, attracts 300-400 children each year.

As another component, a poster contest is held each year prior to the fair with categories for ages 5-8, 9-13, 14-19 and groups. Awards are presented to first, second, third and honorable mention finalists in each category. First place award winners will receive a $25 gift card from Findlay Fraternal Order of Police. Winners will be announced at 2 p.m. Sept. 1 at the Danger Zone tent where all of the posters will be displayed.

Contact staff writer Jeannie Wiley Wolf at:

(419) 427-8419

jeanniewolf@thecourier.com

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Many winners named in fair contests

Second-day attendance at the Hancock County Fair was above average on Thursday, as cooler weather may have encouraged more people to visit the fairgrounds.

The weather forecast for the rest of the fair calls for sunny days with highs in the low to mid-80s. That sounds like "perfect fair weather," ticket chairman Tom Warren said Thursday.

Many more winners have been named in junior fair and open class competitions:



Junior fair

Poultry

Meat class — Jacob Brown, Rocky Ford Guys and Gals, first; Tyler Brown, Rocky Ford Guys and Gals, second.

Turkey — Tyler Brown, first; Jacob Brown, second.

Pullets, standard — Michael Schlumbohm, Blue Ribbon Stock, first; Tucker Routson, second.

Pullets, bantam — Ashlee Lynch, Hancock Hareraisers, first; Olivia Altvater, Riverbend 4-H, second.

Goose — Riley Patterson, Millstream Farmers, first; Kaitlyn Smith, Hancock Hareraisers, second.

Cockbird, standard — Issac Sampson, Magic Makers, first; Ethan Holliger, Country Bumpkins, second.

Cockbird, bantam — Michael Schlumbohm, first; Lacy Allen, Millstream Farmers, second.

Fancy trio — Lacy Allen, first; Olivia Altvater, second.

Duck — Kaitlyn Smith, Hancock Hareraisers, first; Lacy Allen, second.

Hens, standard — Olivia Altvater, first; Becky Wolford, Shooting Stars, second.

Hens, bantam — Riley Patterson, Millstream Farmers, first; Aubrey Brown, Prospectors, second.

Cockerels, standard — Riley Patterson, first; Kaitlyn Smith, second.

Cockerels, bantam — Riley Patterson, first; Michael Schlumbohm, second.

Senior showmanship — Riley Patterson, first; Becky Wolford, second.

Intermediate showmanship — Kaitlyn Smith, first; Shelby Davis, second.

Junior showmanship — Aubrey Brown, first; Nicolas Taylor, Clever Clovers, second.

Super showmanship — Michael Schlumbohm, first; Kaitlyn Smith, second.

Turkey showmanship — Kaitlyn Smith, first; Jacob Fenstermaker, Hancock Hareraisers, second.

Waterfowl showmanship — Lacy Allen, first; Kaitlyn Smith, second.

Adult showmanship, ladies — Corey Hofner, Bowling Green, first; Robin Roth, Findlay, second.

Adult showmanship, men — Jay Warren, Jenera, first; Justin Parkins, Pandora, second.

Dog show

Senior showmanship B — Andrea Mitchell, K-9 Best Friends, first; Laura Beach, K-9 Best Friends, second.

Intermediate showmanship B — Mikayla Brown, K-9 Best Friends.

Junior showmanship B — Kelsey Craig, K-9 Best Friends, first; Cheyanne Taylor, K-9 Best Friends, second.

Senior showmanship A — Jessica Larkey, K-9 Best Friends.

Graduate novice A — Andrea Mitchell.

Open class B — Laura Beach.

Assistant dogs — Andrea Mitchell, first and second.

Intermediate showmanship A — Olivia Roberts, K-9 Best Friends, first.

Junior showmanship A — Josie Smith, K-9 Best Friends, first; Harley Ganshow, Millstream Farmers, second.

Novice A — Caitlin Schellenbarger, K-9 Best Friends, first; Kelsey Craig, K-9 Best Friends, second.

Novice B — Nicole Fisher, K-9 Best Friends.

Sub Novice B — Cheyanne Taylor, K-9 Best Friends, first; Kathryn Sobczyk, K-9 Best Friends, second.

Sub Novice A — Aubrey Brown, K-9 Best Friends, first; Jessica Larkey, K-9 Best Friends, second.

Horse show

Senior English pleasure — Ashley Sweat, Gentle Giants, first; Sydney Batt, Horsemasters, second.

Junior English pleasure — Sara Oler, Lucky Horseshoes, first; Erica Frantz, Rocking R Riders, second.

Easy gaited pleasure — Ashlee Haynes, Freedom Reins, first; Calvin Ice, Freedom Reins, second.

Senior western pleasure — Cassandra Frantz, Rocking R Riders, first; Rachel Kerns, Horsemasters, second.

Junior western pleasure — Allie Begg, Lucky Horseshoes, first; Brandy Smith, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Pony pleasure — Ashley Flick, Lucky Horseshoes, first; Rae Lynne Lee, Rocking R Riders, second.

Walk-trot horse — Kaitlyn Kniss, Horsemasters, first; Kayla DeMuth, Horsemasters, second.

Senior champion pleasure — Ashley Sweat, first; Cassandra Frantz, second.

Junior champion pleasure — Allie Begg, first; Brandy Smith, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Novice pleasure — Tara Roeder, Horsemasters, first; Clint Patrick, Circle V Riders, second.

Walk-trot horsemanship/equitation horse — Kayla Demuth, Horsemasters, first; Kaitlyn Kniss, Horsemasters, second.

Novice horsemanship/equitation — Madison Bruce, Horsemasters, first; Tara Roeder, Horsemasters, second.

Senior English equitation — Sydney Batt, Horsemasters, first; Whitney Simmons, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Junior English equitation — Erica Frantz, Rocking R Riders.

Senior western horsemanship — Cassandra Frantz, Rocking R Riders, first; Rachel Kerns, Horsemasters, second.

Junior western horsemanship — Brandy Smith, Lucky Horseshoes, first; Cristen Cramer, Horsemasters, second.

Junior/senior horsemanship/equitation/easy gaited — Ashlee Haynes, Freedom Reins, first; Calvin Ice, Freedom Reins, second.

Pony horsemanship/equitation — Kirsten Kloepfer, Circle V Riders, first; Ashley Flick, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Cones and barrels — Alicia Corwin, Rocking R Riders, first; Michelle Brown, Gentle Giants, second.

Barrel racing — Alicia Corwin, first; Allyson Farkas, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Western riding — Amanda Ball.

Versatility — Michelle Brown, first; Cristen Cramer, second.

Horse and pony, speed and control — Michelle Brown, Gentle Giants, first; Allyson Farkas, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Pole bending — Alicia Corwin, Rocking R Riders, first; Michelle Brown, second.

Champion senior horsemanship — Cassandra Frantz, Rocking R Riders, first; Rachel Kerns, Horsemasters, second.

Champion junior horsemanship — Cristen Cramer, Horsemasters, first; Brandy Smith, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Walk-trot horse grand champion — Kayla Demuth, Horsemasters, first; Kaitlyn Kniss, Horsemasters, second.

Pony grand champion — Ashley Flick, Lucky Horseshoes, first; Rae Lynn Lee, Rocking R Riders, second.

Sheep

Champion wether — Dustin Spangler, Van Buren FFA, champion; Charles Shoop, Kountry Kids, reserve champion.

Champion ewe — Dustin Spangler, champion; Hannah Elsea, Flight & Fancy, reserve champion.

Champion Suffolk ram — Michaela Wallace, Riverbend 4-H, first; Mara Wallace, Riverbend 4-H, second.

Champion Suffolk ewe — Michaela Wallace, first and second.

Champion Suffolk farm flock — Michaela Wallace, first; Mara Wallace, second.

Champion Dorset ram — David Cunningham, Lakeland Leaders, first and second.

Champion Dorset ewe — Taylor Cunningham, Lakeland Leaders, first; David Cunningham, second.

Champion Dorset farm flock — David Cunningham, first; Taylor Cunningham, second.

Champion Columbia ram lamb — Mark Inbody, All Around Champions, first; Mitch Wilson, Rock-N-Roll, second.

Champion Columbia ewe lamb — Mark Inbody, first and second.

Champion Columbia farm flock — Charles Inbody, All Around Champions, first; Mark Inbody, second.

Champion Southdown ram — Zac Metzger, Country Bumpkins, first and second.

Champion Southdown ewe — Zac Metzger, first and second.

Champion Southdown farm flock — Zac Metzger, first; Taylor Cunningham, Lakeland Leaders, second.

Champion Rambouillet ram — Charles Inbody, All Around Champions, first; Luke Inbody, All Around Champions, second.

Champion Rambouillet ewe — Charles Inbody, first and second.

Champion Rambouillet farm flock — Charles Inbody, first; Luke Inbody, second.

Champion ewe, any other breed — Emerson Schroeder, Northwest Stars, first; Charles Shoop, Kountry Kids, second.

Champion ram, any other breed — Charles Shoop, Kountry Kids, first and second.

Champion overall ewe — Luke Inbody, All Around Champions, first; Michaela Wallace, Riverbend 4-H, second.

Champion overall ram — Zac Metzger, Country Bumpkins, first; Charles Inbody, All Around Champions, second.

Champion overall farm flock — Charles Inbody, All Around Champions, first; Luke Inbody, All Around Champions, second.

Senior showmanship — Charles Inbody, All Around Champions, first; Luther Inbody, All Around Champions, second.

Junior showmanship — Mark Inbody, All Around Champions, first; Michaela Wallace, Riverbend 4-H, second.

Beginner showmanship — Ray Lynn Wise, Barnstormers, first; Taylor Cunningham, Lakeland Leaders, second.

Super showmanship — Charles Inbody, All Around Champions, first; Mark Inbody, All Around Champions, second.



Open class

Domestic Arts and Crafts

For Amateurs

Special Youth Exhibits, Ages 13-18:

Cross stitch — Rachel Steinman, Findlay.

Jewelry — Sarah Neal, Arcadia, first and best of show; Meeghan Kelly, Fostoria, second.

Quilted item — Kayla Kershner, McComb.

Machine sewn item — Lauren Schimmoeller, Rawson.

Item not listed — Samuel Eckert, Findlay, first; Kaitlin Giesey, Findlay, second.

Children's handicrafts winners:

Friendship bracelets — Katelyn Kraus, Findlay, first; Tracy Foltz, Arlington, second.

Wreath — Elizabeth Stahl, Findlay.

Decorated shirt — Emily Stahl, Findlay, first; Michaela Breece, Alvada, second.

Handmade jewelry — Kaleigh Frampton, Van Buren, first; Aubry von Stein, Rawson, second.

Decorated stationery — Elizabeth Stahl, Findlay.

Sand painting, 8 by 10 or less — Elizabeth Stahl.

Lego, creative design, 10 by 10 — Ryan McDowell, Arlington, first; Seth Leader, Deshler, second.

Item not listed — Nathan Knicely, Findlay, first; Jenna Burget, Findlay, second.

Best of show — Nathan Knicely.

Children's special winners:

Machine sewn item — Nicole Biery, Rawson, first; Annie Talmadge, Findlay, second.

Item not listed — Madison Leader, Deshler, first and best of show; Casey Gibbs, McComb, second.

Artwork winners:

12 years and younger:

Pencil — Kaleigh Frampton, Van Buren, first; Rebekah Frampton, Van Buren, second.

Crayon — Zachary Breece, Alvada.

Watercolor — Alexis Youngpeter, Findlay.

Item not listed — Robyn Flick, Van Buren, first and best of show; Devony Miller, Findlay, second.

13-17 years old:

Pencil — Sarah Neal, Arcadia, first; Courtney Gibbs, McComb, second.

Charcoal — Cole Worden, Findlay, first; Sally Hause, Findlay, second.

Watercolor — Lacy Allen, Findlay.

Item not listed — Cole Worden, Findlay, first; Nicholas Finsel, Findlay, second.

Best of show — Cole Worden.

18 years and over:

Pencil — Ruth Dillinger, Forest, first; Shelly Kimble, Findlay, second.

Charcoal — Nathan Foley, Findlay.

Chalk — Sharon Calvelage, Bluffton.

Oil — Janel Line, Findlay, first; Tony Smith, Findlay, second.

Watercolor — Evelyn Dangler, Bluffton, first; Michelle Gibbs, McComb, second.

Pen and ink — Susan Barringer, Van Buren, first and best of show.

Acrylic — Molly Sampson, Mount Blanchard, first; Michelle Frampton, Van Buren, second.

Item not listed — Maggie Morehart, Findlay.

Ceramics, 9 years and younger:

Free-form — Rebekah Frampton, Van Buren, first and best of show; Ethan Campbell, Fostoria, second.

Ceramics, 10-17 years old:

Drybrush stains — Laura Campbell, Fostoria, first; Wayne Campbell, Fostoria, second.

Glaze — Courtney Quinlin, Findlay, first; Rachel Steinman, Findlay, second.

Resin figurines — Nicholas Finsel, Findlay.

Free-form — Courtney Gibbs, McComb, first and best of show; Jesse Eckert, Findlay, second.

Ceramics, 18 years and older:

Underglaze — Pam Talmadge, Findlay.

Glaze — Evelyn Dangler, Bluffton, first and best of show; Angela Tesnow, Findlay second.

Free-form — Tony Smith, Findlay.

Wreaths winners:

Grapevine — Jo Reffitt, Bluffton, first; Tonita Altvater, Findlay, second.

Item not listed — Maggie Morehart, Findlay.

Basketry winners:

Reed — Jo Reffitt, Bluffton, first and best of show; Hannah Russell, Findlay, second.

Decorated goose winners:

12-17 years — Courtney Quinlin, Findlay.

18 years and older — Betty Myers, Arcadia, first, second and best of show.

Hand quilts winners:

Pieced — Mae Adkins, Rawson, first; Jo Ann Aller, Findlay, second.

Hand appliqued — Mary Smith, Bloomdale, first; Mary Hobbs, Findlay, second.

Machine appliqued — Margaret Schuck, Findlay.

Wall hanging — LaDonna Jolliff, Findlay, first; Jo Ann Aller, Findlay, second.

Miniature — LaDonna Jolliff, Findlay.

Item not listed — Miriam Vance, Findlay.

Machine quilts winners:

Pieced — Mary Lute, Arcadia, first; LaDonna Jolliff, Findlay, second.

Wall hanging — LaDonna Jolliff, Findlay, first; Jo Ann Aller, Findlay, second.

Miniature — LaDonna Jolliff.

Item not listed — Carol Murkos, Findlay, first and second.

Afghans winners:

Granny — Jane Griffin, Alvada, first; Sharon Calvelage, Bluffton, second.

Knitted — Marjorie Elder, Findlay, first; Margaret Latham, Rawson, second.

Broomstick lace — Margaret Clymer, Findlay.

Crocheted — Bonnie Struble, Findlay, first and best of show; Jane Griffin, Alvada, second.

Item not listed — Debra Giesey, Findlay.

Rugs winners:

Crocheted — Darlene Lewis, Arcadia, first; Joyce Schroeder, McComb, second.

Crocheted work winners:

Tablecloth — Delores Bushong, Mount Blanchard, first and best of show; Beverly May, McComb, second.

Doily, 18 inches or smaller — Jane Griffin, Alvada, first and second.

Doily, 19 inches or larger — Lois Clark, Findlay, first; Joyce Schroeder, McComb, second.

Item not listed — Margaret Latham, Rawson, first; Bonnie Struble, Findlay, second.

Knitted work winners:

Child's — Margaret Latham, Rawson, first and best of show; Katherine Johnson, Findlay, second.

Woman's — Marjorie Elder, Findlay, first and second.

Man's — Marjorie Elder, first and second.

Scarf/gloves/mittens — Maggie Morehart, Findlay, first; Courtney Quinlin, Findlay, second.

Item not listed — Dorothy Frankart, Fostoria, first; Linda Sharninghouse, Findlay, second.

Needlework winners:

Towel, cotton embroidery — Bonnie Schimmoeller, Rawson.

Pillow case — Linda McRill, Findlay, first and second.

Dresser scarf — Judy Kitch, Findlay, first; Linda McRill, Findlay, second.

Table cloth, cotton embroidery — Judy Kitch, Findlay.

Plastic needlework — Teresa Siferd, Bluffton.

Item not listed — LaDonna Jolliff, Findlay, first and best of show.

Infant and children's bedding winners:

Quilt — Tracy Foltz, Arlington, first; Joyce Schroeder, McComb, second.

Afghan — Jane Griffin, Alvada, first; Pam Talmadge, Findlay, first and best of show; Joan Biery, Rawson, second.

Senior citizens, 60 years plus winners:

Pillow — Evelyn Dangler, Bluffton.

Quilt — Shirley Weaver, Arcadia, first; Jo Ann Aller, Findlay, second.

Afghan — Shirley Weaver, Arcadia, first; Marjorie Elder, Findlay, second.

Item not listed — Janel Line, Findlay, first and best of show; Marjorie Elder, Findlay, second.

Pictures winners:

Crewel embroidery — Lisa Kershner, McComb, first and second.

Cotton embroidery — Judy Kitch, Findlay, first and second.

Beaded cross stitch — Mary Willeke, Findlay, first and second.

Counted cross stitch (aida), 14-17 count, smaller frame — Linda Hall, Findlay, first; Maggie Morehart, Findlay, second.

Counted cross stitch (aida), 18-22 count, smaller frame — Peggy Whitmer, Arlington.

Counted cross stitch (aida), 14-17 count, larger frame — Martha Shaferly, Tiffin, first; Barbara Businger, Findlay, second.

Counted cross stitch (aida), 18-22 count, larger frame — Peggy Whitmer.

Counted cross stitch (linen over 2), 28-33 count, smaller frame — Peggy Whitmer, Arlington, first; Debbie Siebeneck, Findlay, second.

Counted cross stitch (linen over 2), 28-33 count, larger frame — Cathy Rettig, Rawson, first; Debbie Siebeneck, Findlay, second.

Item not listed — Beth Beard, McComb, first, second and best of show.

Decorated shirts winners:

Painted — Darla Thompson, Findlay, first; Shelly Kimble, Findlay, second.

Appliqued — Judy Houdeshell, Arlington, first; Madeline Wilson, Rawson, second.

Counted cross stitch — Linda Sharninghouse, Findlay.

Item not listed — LaDonna Jolliff, Findlay, first and best of show; Janel Line, Findlay, second.

Adult machine sewing for child winners:

Child's pants/skirt — Cindy Lee Boyer, Findlay.

Child's suit/coat — Cindy Lee Boyer.

Christening dress — Jennifer Strapp, Findlay, first and best of show; Kay Livingston, Arlington, second.

Adult machine sewing winners:

Dress/jumper — Mary Willeke, Findlay, first and best of show; Janel Line, Findlay, second.

Evening/bridal/occasion — Marla Roller, Findlay.

Blouse/shirt/vest — Cindy Lee Boyer, Findlay, first; Maggie Morehart, Findlay, second.

Skirt/pants/shorts — Maggie Morehart.

Item not listed — Janel Line, Findlay, first; Maggie Morehart, second.

Pillows winners:

Patchwork — Joyce Schroeder, McComb, first; Margaret Latham, Rawson, second.

Crocheted — Jane Griffin, Alvada, first and best of show; Bonnie Struble, Findlay, second.

Item not listed — Susan Wolford, Findlay, first; Brenda Blunk, Findlay, second.

Toys winners:

Dolls 12 inches or smaller — Tracy Foltz, Arlington.

Dolls 13 inches or larger — Tracy Foltz.

Stuffed — Maggie Morehart, Findlay.

Best of show — Tracy Foltz.

Handicrafts winners:

Stained glass — Mary Burget, Findlay.

Silk flower arrangement — Randy Larson, Findlay, first and second.

Jewelry — Nathan Foley, Findlay, first; Jill Kelly, Fostoria, second.

Christmas ornament — Joyce Schroeder, McComb, first; Linda Sharninghouse, Findlay, second.

Wall hanging — Joyce Schroeder, first; Mary Willeke, Findlay, second.

Item not listed — Tracy Foltz, Arlington, first and best of show; Lisa Kershner, McComb, second.

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Findlay Airport awarded $1.15 million federal grant

Four area airports will get more than $2 million in funding from the Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Sen. George Voinovich, R-Ohio, announced earlier this week.

“I’m pleased that these Ohio recipients will be able to improve their services through these vital funds,” Voinovich said. “It is critical that we continue to improve the safety and efficiency of our airports.”

Local airports receiving money are:

• The Findlay Airport will get $1.15 million to relocate a taxiway and expand the terminal apron.

• The Fostoria city airport will get $274,218 to acquire snow removal equipment and relocate fuel dispensers.

• The Hardin city airport in Kenton will get $278,533 to install runway lighting, mark the runway and remove obstructions.

• The Seneca County airport in Tiffin will get $450,000 for land acquisition to clear the runway object free area and prevent incompatible land use.

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Ex-Findlay man indicted on two murder charges

BOWLING GREEN -- A former Findlay man has been indicted by a Wood County grand jury in connection with a fatal shooting of two men at a Perrysburg Township trucking company earlier this month.

Calvin Neyland Jr., 43, was indicted on two counts of aggravated murder for the Aug. 8 deaths of Douglas Smith, 44, of Sylvania Township, and Thomas “Tomm” Lazar, 58, of Belle Vernon, Pa. Neyland, who is being held without bond in the county jail in Bowling Green, is to be arraigned Sept. 12 by Common Pleas Court Judge Robert Pollex.

Authorities have said Lazar, a retired state trooper, had gone to Liberty Trucking’s Perrysburg Township facility where Smith was the manager to assist in the firing of Neyland who was a truck driver for the company.

Lazar was shot in the parking lot, while Smith was shot in his office while calling police for help.

Neyland, who was living in Findlay at the time, reportedly fled in a semi-tractor and was arrested later that day at a motel in Monroe County.

If convicted, Neyland faces the death penalty or life in prison.

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Local smoking violators fined

The two Veterans of Foreign Wars posts were the first organizations in Findlay to be fined for breaking the new statewide smoking law.

VFW Post 5465, located at 315 Walnut St., and VFW Post 3003, located at 122 Clinton Court, were recently fined $100 each. That means they have received warning letters for their first violations and been fined for their second violation. A third violation comes with a $500 fine.

Voters approved the smoking law last November, though it did not go into effect until May 3. A list of area businesses with complaints pending against them are available online at www.thecourier.com.

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Holiday changes ad deadlines

The Courier won’t be published on Monday, in observance of the Labor Day holiday.

Because of the holiday, some advertising deadlines have been moved up this week:

Black and white display advertising for next Tuesday’s newspaper must be placed by noon today. Display advertising for Wednesday’s paper must be placed by 2:30 p.m. today.

Color display advertising for the Thursday, Sept. 6 paper must be placed by today.

Classified advertising and City and Country advertising for Saturday’s newspaper must be placed by 2 p.m. today. Classified advertising for Tuesday’s paper must be placed by 2:30 p.m. today.

Courier business and advertising offices will close early today, at 3 p.m., for the holiday weekend.

The newsroom will operate during regular hours today and tonight.

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Public Record

Docket

The following incidents were reported to the Findlay Police Department and the Hancock County Sheriff's Office.

Police Department

A windshield of a vehicle was broken out at 341 Cherry St., prior to 10:30 p.m. Wednesday.

A man was arrested for domestic violence after attacking his mother at a East Lincoln Street residence at about 6 a.m. Thursday.

A man was pulled over for driving 37 mph in a 25 mph zone and cited for possession of marijuana when an officer found a joint butt in the ashtray of his car. He had been seen leaving a known drug house on Putnam Street.

A man was arrested for criminal trespassing after he went to a Putnam Street residence at about 3 a.m. Thursday after he had earlier been warned not to go there.

A woman reported seeing another woman being forced into a vehicle by three men in the 1000 block of North Main Street at about 11:15 p.m. Wednesday. Police went to the area but did not locate the vehicle.

Domestic violence charges are expected to be filed after a man and woman fought at a South Blanchard Street residence at about 9 p.m. Wednesday.

A man is facing a felony domestic violence charge after he grabbed and pushed his wife at a Center Street residence at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Camera equipment was stolen from a vehicle at 802 W. Melrose Ave., on Tuesday or Wednesday.

A cast iron claw foot tub was stolen from a yard at 611 S. Blanchard St., where it had been set to dry out from the flood. The theft is believed to have occurred between Monday and Wednesday.

Two bikes were stolen from 400 E. Foulke Ave., on Tuesday or Wednesday.

Two tires and rims were stolen during a break-in at Snyder's Auto-Mart, 208 N. Main St., between Saturday and Monday.

A man driving a motorcycle through an obstacle course set up at the Buffalo Wild Wings parking lot on Tuesday, bumped into two parked motorcycles, which knocked over three other bikes. The collisions caused minor to moderate damage to the other motorcycles.

A purse was stolen from a vehicle parked at 2800 Fostoria Ave. prior to 3:25 p.m. Tuesday.

A bike was stolen from 2000 Old Mill Road on Tuesday.

Sheriff's Office

A camper was damaged, apparently vandalized, at the Hancock County Fairgrounds prior to 11 p.m. Wednesday.

A 14-year-old girl was kicked out of the fair after she assaulted another teen at the fairgrounds at about 8:30 p.m. Wednesday.

Horses were running loose on Township Road 25 last Friday, but were rounded up within a short period of time.

A County Road 216 resident reported her son had stolen a grill and rototiller from her rural home last week, apparently to support his crack cocaine habit. The suspect had sold the rototiller to a local lawn mower shop for $25. The grill was not immediately located.

A Cass Township man reported last week that someone had used his debit card information to make over $4,000 worth of purchases in Mexico and Texas.

Courthouse

The following activity took place in Hancock County Common Pleas Court:

Lisa K. Norway, 37, of Findlay, was sentenced to a year in prison by Judge Reg Routson on five counts of forgery and one count of theft, all fifth-degree felonies. Norway was charged with forging two $475 checks on the account of OK Industries in Findlay on May 7 and May 10, forging three $300 checks on the account of a Findlay man in April, and with stealing over $500 cash from a Findlay woman in March and April. As part of her sentence, the defendant has been ordered to make $5,327.50 restitution to the three crime victims.

James W. Sewell Jr., 47, of Findlay, was placed on community control sanctions for five years by Judge Routson on a fourth-degree felony aggravated trafficking in drugs conviction. Sewell had been convicted in July of selling less than the bulk amount of Oxycodone, a controlled substance, on July 8, 2005 in Findlay. As part of his sentence he was ordered to pay $75 restitution. If he fails to complete his sanctions he will have to serve a 9-month prison term.

Nathan A. Nisley, 24, of Findlay, was placed on probation for two years by Judge Routson on a first-degree misdemeanor theft conviction. Nisley had been indicted on a fifth-degree felony theft charge after he stole a Pepsi machine, valued between $500-$5,000, on Nov. 11 in Findlay. The charge was reduced as part of a plea-bargain agreement. Nisley was ordered to serve 180 days in jail and fined $1,000 but 92 days of the jail term and $250 of the fine were suspended. He was given credit for 88 days he had already served.

Rodney A. Ferguson, 37, of Findlay, was convicted of receiving stolen property, a fifth-degree felony, by Judge Routson. A PSI was ordered. Ferguson had been indicted on two counts of receiving stolen property after he retained the two credit cards that had been stolen from a Findlay man on April 1. One of the charges was dismissed as part of a plea-bargain agreement.

Scott E. Boyd, Jr., 22, of North Baltimore, was convicted of trafficking in marijuana, a fifth-degree felony, by Judge Routson. A PSI was ordered. Boyd had been indicted for selling less than 200 grams of marijuana on April 22 and April 27, 2006 in Findlay. One count of the indictment was dismissed as part of a plea-bargain agreement.

Steven C. Winget, Jr., 19, of Findlay, was convicted of two fourth-degree felony drug trafficking charges by Judge Routson. A PSI was ordered. Winget was charged in June with selling lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) on Nov. 15 and with selling hallucinogenic mushrooms on Nov. 20 in Findlay.

Wendall F. Harris, 40, of Findlay, was convicted of two counts of trafficking in marijuana, both fifth-degree felonies, by Judge Niemeyer. A pre-sentence investigation (PSI) was ordered. Harris had been indicted for selling less than 200 grams of marijuana on Feb. 15, 2005 and March 2, 2005 in Findlay.

Roger S. Mesna, 36, of Findlay, was convicted of two counts of trafficking in cocaine, both fourth-degree felonies, by Judge Niemeyer, who ordered a PSI. He had been indicted after selling less than five grams of cocaine within 1,000 feet of Findlay High School on Jan. 23 and Jan. 24, 2006.

Jonathan A. Paris, 22, of Findlay, was convicted of trafficking in marijuana, a fifth-degree felony, by Judge Niemeyer. A PSI was ordered. Paris had been charged after he sold less than 200 grams of marijuana to a police informant on Nov. 27, 2006 in Findlay.

Divorces, Dissolutions

Alicia J. Green and Ronnie R. Green, dissolution.

Rachel L. Maag and Jeffrey D. Maag, dissolution.

Lisa L. Staples and Steven M. Staples, dissolution.

Danita L. Smith from Brian D. Smith, divorce.

Karla Y. Flores from Juan M. Rojas, divorce.

Etta Malone and Harvey Malone, dissolution.

Real Estate Transfers

Bradley D. and Kirsten Eckerman to Randall C. and Joanne S. Lawless, Section 27, 5.001 acres, Cass Township.

John B. Robinson to Mark A. and Kim M. Kintner, lot 2791, Shafer Addition, Findlay.

Dennis L. and Elizabeth K. Ferguson to Christopher W. and Karen J. Beeman, Section 1, 2.000 acres, Eagle Township.

Kevin J. and Karen J. Crook to Micah A. and Victoria L. Kurtz Randall, Lot 213, Parkside 2nd Addition, Findlay.

Herbert C. and Carol D. Woodward to Marcus W. Vermillion Sr., Lot 12, Delaware Addition, Findlay.

Robert R. and Deborah Beachler to Matthew J. Dewar, Lots 30-31, Van Buren Original Addition, Van Buren.

Ethelann Stumpp to C. Frederick Stumpp, Unit 12-A, Birchaven Estates at Eastern Woods Addition, Marion Township.

James H. and Tamara Launder to Brown & Brown Properties, Lot 5, Westfield Business Park Addition, Liberty Township.

Wesley C. and Patricia R. Applegate Loetz to Robert A. Wolford, Section 12, .32 acre, Madison Township.

Dennis C. and Jeannette Mathern to Randall W. and Lorie L. Bishop, Section 3, 5.001 acres and Section 3, .496 acre, Liberty Township.

McBride Construction, Joshua, Jerry and Robert McBride to Darrin R. and Jodi L. Lanasky, Lot 7, Hickory Grove Subdivision 1st Addition, Arlington.

Millstream Building Systems Inc. to John R. and Gloria G. Bame, Lot 11, West Park Plat Addition, Findlay.

Craig D., Susan K., William L. and Marilyn J. Spoon and Jacqueline A. Lytle to John R. and Gloria G. Bame, Lots 12-13, West Park Plat Addition, Findlay.

Barbara and Steve Reese to Sue and Paul R. Sheeter, Part of Section 1, Washington Township.

Adelia L. and Thomas A. Holman to Paul R. Sheeter, Part of Section 1, Washington Township.

Hancock County sheriff, Adam K. and Jill S. Peterson to Kimberly M. Peterson, Lot 94, George Ede Addition, Findlay.

Miguel F. and Mike E. Rodriguez to Steven E. Rodriguez, Lots 7940-7941, Swing Addition, Findlay.

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