Thursday, August 30th, 2007


Thousands register for federal help
By mid-afternoon Wednesday, a total of 2,651 households in Northwest Ohio had already registered with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for federal flood assistance, and inspections of damaged buildings were well under way.
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Flood damage clobbers several nonprofit groups
By MARGARET DWIGGINS
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Damaged businesses eligible for SBA loans
Businesses which sustained damage in the flood can receive low-interest loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).
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YMCA has $750,000 in damages
Like a good workout, the Findlay YMCA is moving slow and steady to make the downtown facility fit for visitors again. It should be healthy in about three weeks.
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Work progressing on office buildings
Flood-damaged Hancock County offices were showing some signs of progress Wednesday.
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About 700 homes without gas
About 700 Findlay homes are still without natural gas service as the result of last week’s flooding, according to Columbia Gas of Ohio.
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Flood Briefs
Let Courier know when you reopen
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Village officials hire firm to collect flood-related trash
CAREY — Cleanup efforts in Carey are continuing as the village has contracted for collection of flood-damaged items from local residences.
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FEMA teams have arrived
OTTAWA -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency now has two community relations teams in the areas of Putnam County affected by last week’s flooding.
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County prosecutor to meet with family of slain 2-year-old
OTTAWA (AP) — A county prosecutor wants to meet with the family of a 2-year-old-girl killed in a 1986 fire before deciding whether to retry the U.S.-British citizen who had been sentenced to death in her murder.
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Three city men facing drug charges
Three Findlay men made their initial court appearances in Hancock County Common Pleas Court on Wednesday on drug charges handed down by recent grand juries.
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Leipsic celebrates 150 years
LEIPSIC — In its 150-year history, the village of Leipsic has witnessed everything, from a devastating fire ripping through its downtown in the early 1900s to most-wanted bank robber John Dillinger quietly passing through town in the 1930s without a second glance from a Leipsic store clerk from whom he purchased a newspaper — with his own photo gracing its front cover.
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Carey couple wins lawsuit filed against village officials
CAREY — A jury in U.S. District Court, Toledo, recently ruled in favor of a Carey couple who filed a lawsuit against the village last year over items removed from a tract of land. But the settlement they received is far less than what was sought.
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Livestock auction a Labor Day tradition at fair
It's as much a tradition at the Hancock County Fair as cotton candy, harness racing and the ring-toss cane game.
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Children find out how their gardens grow
Caleb Pees brought in an 18-pound, 5-ounce pumpkin and a sunflower larger than his head. Jordan Keckler's pumpkin weighed just 13 ounces.
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Many winners named as fair opens
Workers at the Hancock County Fairgrounds — which was flooded a week ago — were watering some roadways on Wednesday to keep the dust down.
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Public Record
Docket
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Three countywide issues placed on this fall's ballot
TIFFIN — Voters will decide the fate of a 0.3-mill, five-year renewal levy for the Seneca County Commission on Aging to maintain senior citizen services and facilities in the county. It's one of three countywide issues on the Seneca County general election ballot Nov. 6.
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Local News

Thousands register for federal help

By DENISE GRANT

Staff Writer

By mid-afternoon Wednesday, a total of 2,651 households in Northwest Ohio had already registered with the Federal Emergency Management Agency for federal flood assistance, and inspections of damaged buildings were well under way.

"It's moving very quickly, with remarkable speed," said Randy Welch, an information officer with FEMA. "That's good. We want to get people the help that they need as quickly as possible."

Welch commended the efforts of local and state officials in working to get the federal disaster declaration done so quickly.

FEMA inspections of damaged homes started Tuesday, and some flood victims in Northwest Ohio could begin receiving disaster relief payments within days. The checks are typically between $2,000 and $3,000.



Permit requirement

Residents of flood-damaged homes in Findlay's 100-year flood plain must have a flood development permit before federally-funded repair or reconstruction of a home begins. Fees for these permits have been waived.

The permit requirement applies to all affected structures in the flood plain, not just those with substantial damage. Most homes affected by the Aug. 21-22 flooding in Findlay are in the 100-year flood plain.

To apply for a permit, or to verify that a structure is located within the flood plain, Findlay residents should contact the city's zoning office at 419-424-7108. Residents outside the city should contact the Hancock County Engineer's Office at 419-422-7433.



FEMA centers

FEMA disaster recovery centers are also expected to arrive in Northwest Ohio soon. Welch said an announcement could come today on their locations.

The centers serve as a one-stop, walk-in centers for flood assistance. At the centers, flood victims can get information about rebuilding, the status of their aid, and speak to volunteer agencies, crisis counselors and state agencies.

There will also be flood insurance experts and representatives of the Small Business Administration at the centers.



Get registered

On Wednesday, Welch was still encouraging flood victims to get registered with FEMA.

To register, people must call 1-800-621-FEMA (3362), or apply online at www.fema.gov/assistance/index.shtm.

FEMA will then schedule a home inspection. Once that inspection is complete, and all the necessary information has been compiled, Welch said flood victims can expect their money within days, especially if the funds are to be deposited electronically.



Be on guard

Welch also warned flood victims to stay alert. He said disasters can bring out the best and worst in people.

"Often in a disaster, we see some great heroic moments. People, who are suffering through their own disasters, pressing on to help others. We also see the worst of human behavior. People who target disaster victims because they are confused, out of their element and need help," he said.

"It is time to be on your guard. Be wary of people who call and say they are from the government, or that there is a fee for these services."



Still waiting

For local government entities, including Findlay and Hancock County governments, and Findlay City Schools, the wait for flood aid is going to be a little longer.

Welch explained that Monday's disaster declaration applied only to individuals and businesses. Welch said Northwest Ohio's public entities are still tallying up the damage, and then a decision will be made whether these entities need federal assistance.

Findlay's city government is expecting its losses will top $20 million, and the city schools are looking at $1 million in expenses to fix Central Middle School, 200 W. Main Cross St., so local government officials want FEMA to help offset the bills.

With government entities, FEMA is mostly concerned about repairs needed for infrastructure — roads, bridges, water and sewer damages, for example.

It would be up to Gov. Ted Strickland to officially ask for a FEMA assessment of damages to public entities.



Cleanup continues

As area residents, businesses and government entities continue tallying up their losses, the cleanup also continued on Wednesday, with area residents facing another day of 90-degree heat — and work that stinks, literally.

The stench from flood-soaked neighborhoods and parks filled the air on Wednesday, and there were complaints that the City of Findlay wasn't moving the trash out fast enough.

Findlay Service Director Mike Sobczyk said the city is trucking out the debris as quickly as possible.

"All of our city trucks are running, plus we are getting a lot of help from the Ohio Department of Transportation," Sobczyk said.

The Hancock County Landfill collected 6,308 tons of flood debris from last Thursday to Tuesday. Landfill Manager Steve Trutt said the landfill is collecting about 1,051 tons a day. Traffic has decreased because only the big trucks are coming in now, for the most part, instead of commercial and residential vehicles.

Officials have been encouraging residents and businesses to put their trash on the curb instead of taking it to the landfill themselves. People have been doing that and it's helped thin out the traffic at the landfill considerably, Trutt said.

He expects traffic to remain steady at the landfill for another week "for sure." Some flood debris is coming in from Ottawa, too, he said.

Crews of the City of Findlay, the Ohio Department of Transportation and contracted companies will continue to pick up trash this week, until the landfill closes on Saturday. There will be no flood-related trash pickup on Sunday or Monday, which is the Labor Day holiday.

Trash pickup will then resume Sept. 4-8. After Sept. 8, large trash containers will be placed in different parts of the City of Findlay to which residents will be able to transport their trash. Container locations will be announced next week.

The containers will be available until Sept. 13, after which residents will be responsible for hauling their own trash.



Gas service

Meanwhile, about 700 homes in Findlay are still without natural gas service. Columbia Gas employees are working to restore service on a first-call, first-served basis.

Customers may call the company's emergency phone number at 1-800-344-4077 to report an emergency or schedule an appointment to have service restored. (A story about the procedure for restoring gas service appears on page A7 today).



Cleanup kits

The Red Cross is continuing to hand out flood cleanup kits. The kits, available at the Cube, 3430 N. Main St, come in two boxes. One box includes a mop and broom. The second box includes a bucket, gloves, bleach and other cleaning supplies.

The kits are available free.

Contact staff writer Denise Grant at:

(419) 427-8412

denisegrant@thecourier.com

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Flood damage clobbers several nonprofit groups

By MARGARET DWIGGINS

FAMILY EDITOR

and JEANNIE WILEY WOLF

STAFF WRITER

It has been said that the hardest hit victims of last week's flood were those that could least afford the loss.

Such is the case with several of Findlay's nonprofit organizations, which struggle to stay afloat financially under the best of circumstances.

Although many of the area's nonprofits are housed at the Family Center on North Blanchard Street and were not affected by the flood, many others have offices that were ravaged by floodwaters. Almost all experienced losses in the tens of thousands of dollars.



Arts Partnership

Although the floodwaters did not advance as far as the Arts Partnership's office at 618 S. Main St., the building's basement filled with about 3 feet of water last Wednesday.

The water was not discovered until Thursday and everything stored in the basement was lost.

Executive Director Char Johannigman said the basement was mainly used to house supplies for Arts Partnership events and included electrical equipment and arts and crafts supplies, among other items.

Additionally, the Arts Partnership's Youtheatre program lost all its costumes, props and construction supplies, as those items were stored in a warehouse leased from the Hancock Historical Musuem.

Johannigman estimates the loss at about $25,000, and says it could have been much worse had the water entered the group's office space.

"Luckily, all our financial records were salvaged," she said.



Children's Mentoring Connection

It's business as usual at the Children's Mentoring Connection, 305 E. Lincoln St., despite the agency's basement filling with water last week.

Nicole Haggerty, administrative case manager for the agency, said items used for activities, such as fishing poles and coolers, were lost, as were the agency's water heater and furnace.

But since the water never entered the office area, the office is functioning normally.

Fort Findlay Playhouse

Ironically, the Fort Findlay Playhouse had just taken out a large loan to have the basement at its 300 W. Sandusky St. facility waterproofed. Although the work was only in the beginning stages, no amount of waterproofing could have saved the building's basement, which underwent an expensive remodeling eight years ago, from ruin.

Jim Toth, artistic director and past president of the playhouse, said the basement was filled with water to within an inch of the ceiling and everything stored in the basement was lost.

Fortunately, water did not enter the auditorium, but the loss of electricity and restrooms, coupled with a healthy crop of mold, will force the playhouse to delay the opening of its upcoming "Little Shop of Horrors" production by a month or more.

Toth said the playhouse organization had sought flood insurance in the past but was told that it was not available since the playhouse is not in the flood plain.

Additionally, the playhouse lost about $100,000 worth of costumes which were stored at a warehouse owned by the Hancock Historical Museum.

Like so many others affected by the flood, Toth said the situation could have been much worse for the playhouse, since the auditorium was not affected and many of the costumes stored at the warehouse were recently moved to the second floor.

However, Toth said the Findlay Light Opera, University of Findlay and the Youtheatre organization probably lost everything they had stored in the warehouse.

Toth said the playhouse will explore grants and any money that might be available through the government, although he knows the organization will be lower on the priority list than homeowners.



Hancock Historical Museum

The Hancock Historical Museum at 422 W. Sandusky St. will be closed for tours until Tuesday.

The museum office is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. this week.

The basement of the 1881 Hull-Flater House flooded twice, said curator/archivist Paulette Weiser. About 4 feet of ground water was pumped out last Wednesday night. The following morning, it was replaced with 4 feet of sewer water.

"There was so much pressure, it blew the cap right off the (sewer) pipe," said Weiser.

The basement had been used to store cameras and darkroom equipment, supplies and equipment for children's programming and exhibits, all of the Christmas decorations, and books that are sold in the museum's gift shop.

"We lost hundreds of books," said Weiser. "That was probably the most costly thing."

The boiler and water heater will also have to be checked.

The Agriculture and Transportation Barn, located just north of the main museum complex, had about 3 inches of water. The water was drained and the floor was washed and bleached.

The Funk House, located at 345 East St., was not damaged. But wooden Christmas decorations stored at the Riverside Train on County Road 236 were damaged.

The museum also had to cancel the second annual Backstreet Festival that was scheduled for Aug. 25. The event will not be rescheduled, said director Sue Tucker.

The museum will refund tickets purchased for the festival's chicken barbecue. However, people may also donate the $7 they paid for each ticket which would help with some of the museum's flood-related expenses, Tucker said.



Mission Possible

The offices of Mission Possible at 124 W. Front St. also suffered heavy damage.

The agency, which operates seven schools in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, is moving forward with field operations, despite damage to the offices and the loss of computers, files, furniture, promotional materials and office supplies and equipment.

Also lost were numerous bottles of vitamins which were to be sent to students in the Dominican Republic and Haiti.

Kimberly Ritter, director of stewardship for Mission Possible, said employees are working from their homes and a temporary office space until the Front Street office can be cleaned and reoccupied.

Damage is estimated at $15,000-$20,000.



Open Arms

After having to suspend services last week, Open Arms Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Services hopes to be fully functional by Friday.

Andrew Bixel, communications coordinator for the agency, said the offices at 401 W. Sandusky St. suffered heavy damage, with over 5 feet of water in the basement. The water destroyed the agency's phone, computer and security systems, as well as its boiler, water heater and air conditioning system.

Calls made to Open Arms' crisis hotline were routed to the Hancock County Sheriff's Office from Aug. 21-24. While several calls were received, Bixel said there may have been others that were lost.

By last Friday, Open Arms was able to reroute crisis calls to a cell phone. Anyone calling with a crisis will have their call answered by an agency staff member, Bixel said.

Open Arms' safe house also sustained heavy damage, with about 4 feet of water in the house. Bixel said a staff member and two clients were stranded in the house but were never in any danger.

Suspended services at the Sandusky Street office included the Harmony House visitation center and support groups.

Executive Director Beth Meeks said the agency's losses will be at least $20,000, but that amount does not include the contents of the office that were lost, or income that was lost when Harmony House, which charges fees for its services, was shut down. Meeks said losses could reach as high as $50,000.



Read for L.I.F.E.

Everyone expects that a new director coming to an agency will have some time to "get their feet wet," but Kathy Krucki, who was officially hired as the executive director of Read for L.I.F.E. on Aug. 8, has probably had her fill of getting wet.

The office for the adult literacy program, located in the basement of the Findlay-Hancock County Public Library, filled with several feet of floodwater and will be closed until further notice.

"We lost everything," Krucki said, noting that books used by clients as well as computers, supplies and records were all destroyed. "We'll have to start from scratch," she said.

Phone and e-mail messages to the agency will be returned, Krucki said. Current students are being encouraged to meet with their tutors at alternate sites.

Tutors are being asked to call 419-425-3515 or e-mail readforlife@yahoo.com to provide contact and student information.

Donations may be sent to P.O. Box 1032, Findlay, 45839.

Contact Family Editor Margaret Dwiggins at:

(419) 427-8477

margaretdwiggins@thecourier.com

Contact Staff Writer Jeannie Wolf at:

(419) 427-8419

jeanniewolf@thecourier.com

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Damaged businesses eligible for SBA loans

By LOU WILIN

STAFF WRITER

Businesses which sustained damage in the flood can receive low-interest loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

Up to $1.5 million is available for most businesses at a 4 percent interest rate, according to Public Information Officer Tom Nocera of SBA's Office of Disaster Assistance.

Loan terms can be for up to 30 years with the recipient's first payment deferred for five months.

Companies employing 250 or more workers may be eligible for loans larger than $1.5 million.

No federal grants are available to businesses for flood relief, and it is the SBA — not the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) — which will extend the loans to businesses.

Businesses are not required to register with FEMA to obtain a federal loan, Nocera said.

SBA loans are for repair or replacement of real estate, inventories, machinery, equipment and other physical losses. Loans also can alleviate economic injury.

For example, a business might be able to claim a decrease in income because its customers are spending money on home repairs instead of on its goods or services.

Applications for assistance can be downloaded online at www.sba.gov. Information about the loan program can be obtained at the Web site and by calling 1-800-659-2955.

Businesses will soon have an additional place to apply for SBA loans. The FEMA will be opening Disaster Recovery Centers in Findlay, Putnam County, Allen County and Wyandot County, perhaps as soon as Friday.

SBA representatives will be at those centers to assist business owners with applications.

Nocera said that a business owner should hear from the SBA within 14 days about whether an application has been approved.

For loans of $5,000 or less, the funds could be available "very quickly," Nocera said.

Loans for more than $5,000 will require collateral, he said.

Contact staff writer Lou Wilin at:

(419) 427-8413

louwilin@thecourier.com

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YMCA has $750,000 in damages

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

Like a good workout, the Findlay YMCA is moving slow and steady to make the downtown facility fit for visitors again. It should be healthy in about three weeks.

The building at 300 E. Lincoln St. suffered an estimated $750,000 damage and has been closed since last week when nearly 6½ feet of floodwater filled the basement area. Administrative offices and all files stored there, a conference room, furniture and furnishings, all mechanical (air handling equipment) and electrical panels and equipment, along with drywall, were destroyed by the water damage, according to Russ Gartner, YMCA executive director. Large power generators have been in use since then.

When the flood hit, electricity was shut off, as was telephone service, sewage pumps and pool pumps, he added, since all were affected by the water.

"It was like a big aquarium," on the lower level, he said.

The two swimming pools were drained immediately after the flood, utilizing large pumps brought on site to remove the floodwaters.

Large fans and dehumidifiers have been used to dry the facility since the flood.

The building was scheduled to be closed this week, anyway, for its annual maintenance prior to the beginning of a new school year.

But with the flood damage, it will be another few weeks, with a target date of Sept. 17, before the public will be allowed to enter the building.

If the public were to enter the facility today, the first and second floors would look exactly like they did before the flood hit, Gartner said. Electric service was restored Wednesday to the first two floors, and telephone service was also available again.

Restoration needs to be done and a quality control inspection completed before it is reopened, he said. It won't be opened until officials are sure it's safe.

Gartner said he will propose to the YMCA's governing board that the rebuilding effort include moving administrative offices to the top floor, and also getting electrical service panels eventually moved out of the basement.

He was meeting with insurance adjusters and contractors Wednesday to assess the situation.

In the meantime, the YMCA's east branch on Manor Hill Road is open and operating regular hours, he said. The east branch doesn't have any swimming pools.

Over the next few weeks, individuals may have to wait to get on workout machines at the east branch during peak hours, generally after 4 p.m., while other times shouldn't be a problem, he said.

The board will also have to decide whether there will be any adjustment to membership lengths because of the downtown facility's closure, Gartner said.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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Work progressing on office buildings

By MICHELLE REITER

STAFF WRITER

Flood-damaged Hancock County offices were showing some signs of progress Wednesday.

They smelled much better than they did last Thursday, a day after water poured through the walls of several downtown office buildings.

Dehumidifying devices have removed just about every ounce of moisture in the commissioners’ office on South Main Street. Most wet carpets and other mildewy debris have long since been chucked to the curb and some county agencies are starting to move into their temporary modular units.

The temporary offices will allow county agencies to have computer and telephone access while they wait for their offices to be cleaned and renovated.

Commissioner Ed Ingold jokingly referred to the units, which are parked in Dorney Plaza, as “palatial surroundings,” but actually they are no-frills, rectangular, cabin-like buildings that will offer no creature comforts for the next month or so.

Ingold said some county offices that were housed in the county’s media building on West Main Cross Street will have slightly better accommodations, because those offices need them. Nurses for the Hancock County Health Department, for example, will need to wash their hands so their units will require plumbing.

The good news is that the renovations shouldn’t take too long -- maybe a month or a little more for the commissioners and public defenders’ offices, Ingold said, and maybe two months for the media building.

But those are just guesses -- Ingold said he had no solid ideas of how much time the cleaning and renovation actually will take.

The costs are piling up already.

To start, commissioners have already approved a contract with Blackmon-Mooring Steamatic Catastrophe Inc. of Fort Worth, Texas, for up to $200,000 to clean and stabilize the county buildings; a contract with Williams Scotsman Inc. of Holland for the temporary buildings for up to $46,000 and a contract with the Corrections Commissioner of Northwest Ohio, of Stryker, to house Hancock County prisoners for up to $6,956.

Ingold predicted that the county will end up spending more than $1 million on repairs and renovations

Hancock County offices are expected to be fully operational by the end of the week.



Board of Elections

Hancock County Board of Elections Director Jody O’Brien said Wednesday that Diebold, the voting machine manufacturer, inspected the devices this week and confirmed that the flood destroyed 90 of them. That translates to $243,000 worth of voting machines. The county has a total of 270 voting machines.

The board’s own technicians also will examine the remaining machines next week to make sure they are all in working order.

O’Brien said the county may get by with fewer machines for the November election, but it will need the Ohio Secretary of State’s permission first.

By law, one machine must be provided for every 175 registered voters. O’Brien said the office asked the state if that law could be waived in Hancock County for the November election.

If that happens, lines may be longer on election day.

“We’re going to really urge people to vote absentee,” O’Brien said. The more people who vote absentee, the smaller the lines will be, she said.

Some poll site locations may also change, she said. The only poll site the board is sure will have to change is the Anchor Community Center at 215 East St., where Precincts 4-A and 4-B vote. That building has been described as a total loss.

O’Brien said the board of elections is supposed to send out post cards to voters alerting them of changes in their polling places, but the office, which is still operating out of the Hancock County Agricultural Center, doesn’t have the capability for that right now. The changes, when finalized, will be publicized in the media.

Meanwhile, O’Brien said the elections board will be able to certify candidates and issues that filed for the November election today. The election deadline was Monday.



Flood Assistance Line

Anyone affected by the flood in the county or city is encouraged to call a flood assistance line at 419-423-1432. For assistance from FEMA, the Red Cross and Job & Family Services, applications must be filed with each individual program.

Transportation is still available through HATS at 419-423-7261.

Contact Staff Writer Michelle Reiter at: (419) 427-8497 michellereiter@thecourier.com

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About 700 homes without gas

About 700 Findlay homes are still without natural gas service as the result of last week’s flooding, according to Columbia Gas of Ohio.

Employees from across the state are working throughout the community to restore service on a first-call, first-served basis, the utility is reporting.

Columbia Gas of Ohio advises those impacted to have appliances inspected before natural gas service is restored in their homes.

If water was in the basement, any appliance located in the basement needs to be checked by a qualified heating contractor or plumber for possible damage. All appliances must be clear of debris, and all water must be removed from the basement.

If the gas was shut off at the appliance valve only, then the service can be restored by a qualified heating contractor or plumber. If the gas was shut off at the meter valve or at the curb, customers must contact Columbia Gas to restore service. Only a Columbia Gas technician can turn on the natural gas at these settings.

Customers may call the Columbia Gas emergency phone number at 1-800-344-4077 to report an emergency or schedule an appointment to have service restored.

In addition to an inspection, areas in and around the affected units must be safe and healthy to allow Columbia Gas representatives to work.

“We appreciate the patience of the community as we work together to get through these difficult times,” stated Jerry Gray, Manager of the Columbia Gas of Ohio-Lake Erie Operations Center, in a news release. “Our crews are working hard to safely and quickly restore to all those impacted.”

Columbia Gas has crews in flooded areas to shut off gas service to the flooded homes so cleanup work can be started safely. Pink ribbons will be on the outside meter of homes where service has been turned off.

For homes where meters are located inside, pink flags will be in the yards. Additionally, door knob cards will be left at each premise.

With water in the basement, damage may have occurred to switches, controls, thermostats, furnace heat exchangers, burner and pilot parts, and rusting metals parts, to name a few.

Should you hear gas escaping, smell gas in multiple rooms, or smell gas inside and outside of the premises, leave the area, and call Columbia Gas immediately at 1-800-344-4077.

Whenever there is an odor of gas inside, Columbia Gas issues the following warnings: Do not smoke; do not make a spark or flame; do not activate or switch on/off any electrical equipment, including lights, fire alarms, intercom systems and appliances; do not raise or lower the windows; do not make a phone call from inside the building; and do not re-enter the building.

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Flood Briefs

Let Courier know when you reopen

Has your business in the Findlay area reopened after being flooded?

The Courier wants to know!

If you have reopened, please e-mail the Courier's business reporter, Lou Wilin, at louwilin@thecourier.com; or e-mail news@thecourier.com; or drop off a note for Wilin at the Courier's newsroom.

Tell us the name of your business, and your address.

The newspaper will run a daily, updated list of reopened businesses.



'Flood issues' now on sale at Courier

Copies of the Courier for Wednesday, Aug. 22 and Thursday, Aug. 23 — the first "flood issues" — are for sale at the newspaper office, 701 W. Sandusky St.



Marathon donates $45,000 in fuel

To help the city of Findlay in its flood relief efforts, Marathon Oil Co. on Wednesday made a donation amounting to $45,000 worth of fuel.

Speedway SuperAmerica has made a $45,000 credit to an account for the city of Findlay. The city can use its fleet credit card to draw on the account at any Speedway location.

The $45,000 value is equivalent to truck loads of 7,800 gallons of diesel and 8,900 gallons of gasoline.

Originally Marathon wanted to donate two transport trucks of fuels (one diesel and one gasoline), then it learned that the city doesn't have any fuel storage capability.

So the company decided to credit an account for the city.



Volunteers sought for meal Friday

FOSTORIA — Volunteers to help serve a meal to some flood victims and aid workers being housed at the Best Western Fostoria Inn & Suites, on North Countyline Street.

There are currently three families being housed at the hotel — one from Findlay and two from Bettsville — whose residences have been deemed unlivable because of floodwaters. There are also numerous Salvation Army and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) workers, who have been aiding flood victims in Findlay.

The meal — for about 100 people — will be served from 5-8 p.m. Friday at the hotel.

Donations of paper products, homemade side dishes or baked goods of any amount, along with any other items to help the families or aid workers, are also being sought.

To volunteer, or donate items, contact Marti Frederick at the hotel, (419) 436-3600.



Church offering flood relief aid

Bright Road Church of Christ, 535 Bright Road, is helping with disaster relief from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Saturday, and from 1-6 p.m. Sunday, by distributing a variety of items.

Free items for residents include food boxes, cleaning supplies, personal care and school kits. While supplies last, some appliances and furniture are also available, and assistance with cleanup and home repairs is being offered by the Churches of Christ Disaster Response Team.



Immunization clinics relocated

The Findlay City Health Department will be resuming immunization clinics on Thursday, Sept. 6.

Due to flood damage, the clinics will be held at the Family Center, 1800 N. Blanchard St., until further notice.

Clinics are by appointment only. To schedule an appointment call (419) 424-7441.

Debris pickup set

The last day for flood debris pickup in Liberty Township, in the portion outside of the Findlay corporation limits, will be next Tuesday.

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Village officials hire firm to collect flood-related trash

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

CAREY — Cleanup efforts in Carey are continuing as the village has contracted for collection of flood-damaged items from local residences.

Employees of Double K Sanitation are working about 8-10 hours daily six days a week to remove the flood-damaged items that have been placed curbside, according to Village Administrator Roy Johnson. About 400 tons of trash have been collected since the Aug. 21 storm.

Collection will continue at least through Sept. 7, he said.

Despite several feet of water on some village streets, and downtown businesses devastated by the flooding, the village streets look relatively clean because the storm water, although muddy, didn't leave any sediment that had to be cleaned up.

Village electric crews have restored most of the power throughout town, but there are about 30 homes which suffered extensive damage and are uninhabitable, and numerous other homes will require repairs. Immediately after the storm, electricity was shut off to about 100 homes and many residents had to be evacuated from their properties.

Especially hard hit were properties and businesses along Spring Run and Brown Ditch, the two main storm water drainage areas, which run through the village.

The village suffered about $20,000 in damages to offices at the wastewater (sewage) treatment plant on Wyandot Avenue, but otherwise there were no mechanical problems, or damage, at other village offices.

The village's water is safe and the sewer plant is operational, Johnson said.

In fact, the sewer plant, which normally treats about 500,000 gallons per day, treated about 2½ million gallons per day during the day of the storm and for several days after to handle the excessive load.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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FEMA teams have arrived

OTTAWA -- The Federal Emergency Management Agency now has two community relations teams in the areas of Putnam County affected by last week’s flooding.

The teams are handing out information on how to apply for assistance and where to go for information and assistance.

A FEMA Disaster Recovery Center (DRC) is slated to open Friday at the Putnam County Educational Service Center on Parkway Plaza across from the YMCA. Other agencies will have representatives in the DRC as well, with more information to be released on those at a later date.

People affected by the flooding in all of Putnam County may apply for assistance through FEMA at either 1-800-621-FEMA (3362) or www.fema.gov. Everyone must register in order to be eligible for potential assistance.

Also, the Putnam County American Red Cross, which fed 1,200 meals on Tuesday and is currently housing 10 in one shelter, will begin to offer cash assistance to those that applied on Wednesday.

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County prosecutor to meet with family of slain 2-year-old

OTTAWA (AP) — A county prosecutor wants to meet with the family of a 2-year-old-girl killed in a 1986 fire before deciding whether to retry the U.S.-British citizen who had been sentenced to death in her murder.

A federal appeals court ordered earlier this month that Kenneth Richey either be retried or released within 90 days. The attorney general's office on Monday said the state would retry Richey instead of challenging the appeals court decision to the U.S. Supreme Court.

But Putnam County Prosecutor Gary Lammers said he first wants to meet with both state prosecutors and the girl's family.

"I want to have a roadmap as to where we're going with this," he said. "And that needs to be done as soon as possible."

Richey, now 43, was convicted of aggravated murder and sentenced to die for setting the fire that killed 2-year-old Cynthia Collins in an apartment building in Columbus Grove.

Staff members from the office of Ohio Attorney General Marc Dann will meet with Lammers on Friday.

Among the questions is whether Lammers can seek the death penalty against Richey again and what charges he would face.

Appealing the decision that overturned Richey's conviction remains an option, Lammers said.

The county prosecutor said he will ask for help from the state if they move forward with a retrial and that he wants to make that decision quickly.

Richey, who has dual citizenship, came within an hour of being executed 13 years ago.

The 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said in 2005 and again this month that Richey received ineffective counsel at his murder trial.

Prosecutors said Richey set the blaze to get even with his former girlfriend, who lived in the same apartment building as the girl who died.

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Three city men facing drug charges

Three Findlay men made their initial court appearances in Hancock County Common Pleas Court on Wednesday on drug charges handed down by recent grand juries.

All of the cases had been filed in July but had remained "secret" until the defendants were located and served with their indictments.

During arraignments Wednesday, Brandon M. Johns, 21, 1521 Tiffin Ave., entered innocent pleas to two counts of trafficking in marijuana, both fifth-degree felonies, and to trafficking in cocaine, a fourth-degree felony, while Bruce Ferguson, 46, 524 E. Sandusky St., pleaded innocent to two counts of trafficking in cocaine, both fifth-degree felonies.

Both men were released on personal recognizance bonds.

Pretrial hearings are scheduled for Johns on Sept. 10 and for Ferguson on Sept. 14.

Johns is accused of selling marijuana on May 18 and June 1, 2006 and cocaine on June 7, 2006. All three of the offenses occurred in Findlay.

Ferguson is alleged to have sold cocaine on Oct. 10 and Oct. 23, 2006 in Findlay.

The third drug defendant, Prince D. McIntyre, 22, 1004 Crystal Ave., is facing a third-degree felony trafficking charge for allegedly selling crack cocaine in Findlay on Oct. 23, 2006.

The severity of the charge was increased because the alleged drug transaction occurred within 100 feet of a juvenile.

McIntyre's bond was established at $15,000 Wednesday, but his arraignment was continued until next week.

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Leipsic celebrates 150 years

LEIPSIC — In its 150-year history, the village of Leipsic has witnessed everything, from a devastating fire ripping through its downtown in the early 1900s to most-wanted bank robber John Dillinger quietly passing through town in the 1930s without a second glance from a Leipsic store clerk from whom he purchased a newspaper — with his own photo gracing its front cover.

But in the midst of disastrous or zany occasions has also been much growth — a reason to celebrate at this weekend's 2007 Leipsic Sesquicentennial in Buckeye Park.

The three-day event begins Friday at 6 p.m. with "An Old-Fashioned Evening on Main Street," with music, food and an opening proclamation by Mayor Kevin Benton. Addresses from Gov. Ted Strickland and President George W. Bush will also be read.

The 2007 Citizen of the Year, Sharon Basinger, will be honored Friday, as will winners of the "Brothers of the Brush" contest, a Leipsic tradition. The village's men spend months growing facial hair and are not allowed to shave, to "reflect the struggles and sacrifices of our forefathers" according to the official Brothers of the Brush proclamation. Awards will be given for longest beard, whitest beard and most unusual beard, among others.

Saturday's festivities will bring in a COSI on Wheels exhibit from Toledo and a traveling American Civil War Museum from Bowling Green. The Civil War activities continue with a battle re-enactment on the soccer field at 2 p.m. — the most expensive event the sesquicentennial committee financed for the weekend.

"We're just doing one battle because of the expense of the (gun) powder," said Judi Parker, organizer for the event. "It takes 75 pounds of powder for one re-enactment. That's about $600."

Parker said her committee was able to make the sesquicentennial celebration happen only because so many sponsors, from businesses to individuals, stepped up to donate money for the weekend's events.

But all events — minus a $5 per person expense for all meals — remain free, including several tours of Leipsic on Saturday.

One tour, which runs all day Saturday, will bring visitors by bus to stops such as churches, the school, Leipsic Library, new places of industry in town and the cemetery.

"For the people coming back to town for the first time in a while, it will show them new things, like new additions to the school, and the library's changed, and the new industry we have," Parker said. "And the cemetery tour provides commentary on some of the people buried there."

Lantern-lit tours of Civil War encampment areas — where the re-enactors live as they would have during the war, Parker said — begin at 6:30 p.m. Saturday. The night rounds out with an ice cream social from 5-7 p.m., a Civil War ball from 7-8 p.m. and Civil War-era ballroom dancing from 8-11 p.m.

Sunday's events include an "Old-Time Worship Service" at 9 a.m. at the park, and a parade at 2 p.m. beginning at St. Mary's Church ending at Buckeye Park. Throughout the rest of the afternoon and into the evening there will be a veterans' celebration, auction of sesquicentennial items such as bells, cannons and quilts, a talent show at 8 p.m., and fireworks at 10 p.m.

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Carey couple wins lawsuit filed against village officials

CAREY — A jury in U.S. District Court, Toledo, recently ruled in favor of a Carey couple who filed a lawsuit against the village last year over items removed from a tract of land. But the settlement they received is far less than what was sought.

Charles R. and Linda Tackett will receive $3,274 — a far cry from the $500,000 being sought by the couple — the value the jury determined of items removed by village officials.

At issue was the Tacketts' claim that village officials, specifically former Police Chief Dennis Yingling and Mayor Dallas Risner, had attempted to force them off a tract of land adjacent to their residence at 400 Brown Ave. which they claimed to own. The village owns the property.

Village crews previously removed numerous items, mainly vehicle parts, from the property, which provides access to farm land, without the couple's permission. The Tacketts had previously been cited for the condition of the area around their property.

The value of the items removed was the only issue remaining to be resolved from the original lawsuit. The jury did rule that the village's property maintenance ordinance failed to include an appeal option and ruled the ordinance was unconstitutional as a result.

Council is expected to rectify that situation, soon, village officials previously said.

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Livestock auction a Labor Day tradition at fair

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

It's as much a tradition at the Hancock County Fair as cotton candy, harness racing and the ring-toss cane game.

The junior fair livestock auction, held on Labor Day for at least 60 years, is a day-long event which showcases hundreds of animals and culminates many youngsters' months-long work to raise such farm animals as hogs, lambs, cattle or chickens.

The auction is for animals raised by individuals who are 9-19 years old, who are either a 4-H or Future Farmers of America member.

Dennis VonStein, sale committee chairman, and Sharon McCartney, sale secretary, along with Gary Wilson, Hancock County extension agent, sat down recently to discuss the sale.

A sale participant's efforts start months ahead of the county fair's run. Ownership of cattle (dairy feeders and steers) have to be secured by Jan. 1, while six other species — hogs, chickens, rabbits, goats, lambs and turkeys — have to be purchased by June 1. The junior fair sale also includes a gallon of milk.

Cattle that end up at the fair auction are usually bought in the fall, while the other animals are generally purchased in the spring.

Each category of animal has its own set of rules which the youngsters must follow.

The youngsters, or their family, are responsible for the cost of feed, veterinarian bills and any other expenses associated with the animal while it's being raised.

Some youngsters have more than one animal at the fair, with 739 projects at last year's fair, raised by about 600 youngsters.

Animals entered in the junior fair competition don't have to be sold at the Labor Day sale. Some of the animals shown at the fair are taken home. Other animals go directly to the slaughterhouse.

About half of the fair animals — 372 in 2006 — actually go into the sale ring during the auction.

Once ready for the sale ring, a youngster has one chance to show one animal during the fair auction, which is conducted by auctioneers from Walter Brothers and Farthing Real Estate & Auctioneers.

An exemption to the "one-animal rule" occurs if the same person has two champion animals. Both can be sold at the auction.

Each category of animal sold at the sale has a "base bid" or market price that is established by contacting local slaughterhouses. In addition, bidders at the sale offer a "premium bid" above the base bid.

The premium bid is then added to the base bid, and the animal's owner receives the total of the two.

The premium bid frequently comes from friends, family, companies which do business with the family, and other local businesses.

About 90 percent of those making the premium bids don't actually want the animals, Wilson said, so they pay only the premium bids.

If a buyer does want an animal, he would pay the total of the premium and base bids to get it.

The fair auction is big business — and lengthy — with nearly $316,000 in gross sales, base bid and ring bid combined, paid last year during an 8½-hour period.

There is about a 3.9 percent commission paid on the sale price, too.

The commission funds are retained by the sales committee and used for various improvements throughout the fairgrounds, VonStein said.

Last year, $12,593 was paid in commission from the revenue generated at the sale.

Bidding on an animal can be good advertising for a business or for individuals, because they get their name or picture in the newspaper. Oftentimes, multiple buyers will band together to make premium bids.

A special auction category, for the sale of a gallon of milk, produced a bid of $6,400 in 2006 and a record price of $7,500 in 2005. Those funds are divided equally among all junior fair dairy cattle projects entered at the fair.

The youngsters who sell animals — or milk — appreciate the public support. They send thank you notes to the buyers, who may also receive homemade cookies or some other treat.

Even before the auction, youngsters may send letters to prospective buyers encouraging them to participate.

Buyers are also recognized with a plaque to display in their business or office.

The fair auction is open to the general public. If you'd like to register and secure a bid number, contact the sale office at 419-423-0323. Registration may be done until the day of the sale.

A separate auction is held for the dairy feeder animals on Saturday and those livestock are returned to the farm "to be finished out," Wilson said.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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Children find out how their gardens grow

By SARA ARTHURS

Staff Writer

Caleb Pees brought in an 18-pound, 5-ounce pumpkin and a sunflower larger than his head. Jordan Keckler's pumpkin weighed just 13 ounces.

Caleb and Jordan were among the children competing in the sunflower and pumpkin contest for local youth at the Hancock County Fair. Children brought their pumpkins and sunflowers to the fair on Tuesday.

Seven-year-old Caleb, a resident of Rawson, said he started growing his pumpkin and sunflower in the spring. He had to water it a lot.

"We had quite a bit of dry weather," said his mother, Kerri Pees.

This is the first year Caleb has entered a pumpkin and sunflower in the fair. Asked why he wanted to compete, he replied, "'Cause it's fun."

Kerri Pees added that when his older sister joined 4-H, Caleb wanted to be involved in similar activities.

Children picked up their seeds in the spring. It used to be that everyone had to get their seeds from the same place, to ensure that everyone started with the same seeds, though that isn't strictly enforced any more, said Nancy Kronberg of the Men's and Women's Garden Club of Findlay, one of the event's sponsors.

Each child can bring one pumpkin and one sunflower to the competition. To be eligible, children should be between the ages of 5 and 8 as of Jan. 1 of this year. However, a few 4-year-olds showed up and were allowed to display their pumpkins and sunflowers. Kronberg said she couldn't bear to turn them away.

Jordan, a resident of Findlay, was one of the 4-year-olds. She said she planted seeds at her grandparents' house. While her parents and grandparents helped her, she planted the seeds herself.

Jordan said she made an effort to take care of the pumpkin, but the weather helped too. It's the sun and the rain that made her pumpkin grow, she said.

Ann Brickner, also of the Men's and Women's Garden Club of Findlay, said there are usually about 30 entries each year, although she expected fewer this year because of the drought, followed by a flood, that had affected growing conditions.

"It depends on the weather," she said.

But she said children are encouraged to participate in the display however they can. If a child's pumpkins die on the vine, he or she can bring in a photograph of the pumpkin so there will be something on display to show off to the grandparents. Brickner said her favorite part of the competition is watching children's pride in the items they've grown.

The hope is that children will develop a love of gardening and growing things, that the act of watching a small seed grow into a tall sunflower will bring them joy.

"It's almost a miracle, to see that seed grow into something like that," Brickner said.

She added that the pumpkin and sunflower competition encourages parents and children to bond over their gardens.

"It's a project that they can work on together," she said.

Dana Desgranges of Mount Cory brought in a 5-pound, 5-ounce pumpkin. This is her third year in the competition, and she has received ribbons in the past. Dana, 8, grew her pumpkin at her grandmother's house, so working on the project was also a chance to spend time with her grandmother.

It's something she takes pride in: "I do a good job."

Seven-year-old Eli Palmer of Arcadia was competing for the first year. He said he put a lot of work into his sunflower — watering and fertilizing it, and pulling weeds around it. He said he enjoyed the project and wants to do it again in the future.

Sunflowers were eligible for ribbons in four categories: largest, smallest, best shaped and oddest shaped. Pumpkins were eligible for ribbons in eight categories: largest mature, smallest mature, best shape (round), best shape (oval), natural freak growth, hand-trained growth (rope, wire, etc.), oddest shape and greenest.

And there were a variety on display: round pumpkins, tall pumpkins and one large dark green pumpkin.

One family brought in a tiny sunflower, just a few inches in diameter.

Another family brought in pumpkin blossoms rather than actual pumpkins, that being all they got to grow on their vines.

The event is sponsored by the Men's and Women's Garden Club of Findlay and Pure Country Greenhouse.

Contact staff writer Sara Arthurs at

(419) 427-8494

saraarthurs@thecourier.com

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Many winners named as fair opens

Workers at the Hancock County Fairgrounds — which was flooded a week ago — were watering some roadways on Wednesday to keep the dust down.

That was a sign of how much the fairgrounds has dried out since last week's deluge.

Average first-day attendance was reported as the fair began its six-day run on Wednesday.

Despite hot and muggy weather on Wednesday, "It was steady day," ticket chairman Tom Warren reported.

Most of the fairgrounds has dried out nicely, Warren said.

On Wednesday, one parking lot on the south side of the fairgrounds was still "a little sticky," but it's drying out quickly, Warren said. Other parking lots were "great," he said.

Today, the fair is reducing the daily admission charge to $4, down from the normal $7. The daily admission charge covers one adult and the children of a family who are 15 or younger.

As the fair began, many winners were named in both Junior Fair and open class competitions:



Junior Fair

Swine

Champion gilt — Brent von Stein, Cory-Rawson FFA. Reserve champion gilt — Hannah Johnson, SoHan Co.

Champion barrow — Kathryn Jolliff, Jolly Jacksons. Reserve champion barrow — Madison Mains, Barnstormers.

Senior showmanship — Miles von Stein, Country Critters, first; Emily Meents, Rock N Roll, second.

Intermediate showmanship — Michael Schlumbohm, Blue Ribbon Stock, first; Tyler Horn, Barnstormers, second.

Junior showmanship — Mariah Burkholder, Gold Star, first; Michaela Breece, His Kids, second.

Super showmanship — Miles von Stein, Country Critters, first; Michael Schlumbohm, Blue Ribbon Stock, second.

Horse show

Senior English showmanship — Kara Hancock, Freedom Reins, first; Maggie Firestone, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Junior English showmanship — Erica Frantz, Rocking R Riders, first; Shelby Eddington, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Senior western showmanship — Sydney Batt, Horsemasters, first; Rachel Kerns, Horsemasters, second.

Junior western showmanship — Brandy Smith, Lucky Horseshoes, first; Allie Begg, Lucky Horseshoes, second.

Pony showmanship — Tessa Simpson, Horsemasters, first; Rae Lynne Lee, Rocking R Riders, second.

Pony novice showmanship — Logan Desgranges, Circle V Riders, first.

Horse novice showmanship — Kaitlyn Kniss, Horsemasters, first; Tara Roedes, Horsemasters, second.

Senior showmanship grand champion — Kara Hancock, Freedom Reins. Reserve champion — Sydney Batt, Horsemasters.

Junior showmanship champion — Cristen Cramer, Horsemasters. Reserve champion — Allie Begg, Lucky Horseshoes.

Pleasure driving — Nathan Strasbaugh, Gentle Giants, first; Logan Desgranges, Circle V Riders, second.

Cart obstacle driving — Jamie Dillinger, Milk-E-Whey, first; Nathan Strasbaugh, Gentle Giants, second.

Trail — Sara Oler, Rocking R Riders, first; Cristen Cramer, Horsemasters, second.

Reining — Amanda Ball, Gentle Giants, first; Madison Bruce, Horsemasters, second.

Dressage — Maggie Firestone, Lucky Horseshoes.

Senior poster — Calvin Ice, Freedom Reins, first; Kirsten Egts, Rocking R Riders, second.

Junior poster — Aubrey Brown, Freedom Reins, first; Rae Lynne Lee, Rocking R Riders, second.

Fair booths

Large booth:

Best use of motion and movement — Country Critters. Best use of theme — Lakeland Leaders. Most creative — Prospectors Press. Best display of projects — K-9 Best Friends. Best explanation of club work — Millstream Farmers.

Small booth:

Best use of theme — All Around Champions. Most creative — Kountry Kids. Best display of projects — Milk-E-Whey. Best explanation of club work — Clever Clovers.

Pumpkin display

Best shape oval — Nicki Biery.

Smallest mature — Jordan Keckler.

Greenest — Silas Bear.

Oddest shape — Nick Burner.

Largest mature — Mason Greer.

Best shape round — Austin Warren.

Sunflower display

Largest — Nicki Biery.

Smallest — Aimee Ritter.

Best shaped — Malcolm Williams.

Decorated fruits, vegetables

Junior — Claudia Paulhus, first; Jackie Paulhus, second.

Senior — Mariah Weihrauch.

Flower display

Non annual grand champion — Adam Beagle. Reserve champion — Kyle Lanquist.

Non annual most points — Kyle Lanquist, first; Shandell Beagle, second.

Annual grand champion — Rachel Reichleg. Reserve champion — Kyle Lanquist.

Marigold — Aubry von Stein, first; Adam Beagle, second.

Tuberous begonia — Kyle Lanquist.

Dahlia — Adam Beagle, first; Kyle Lanquist, second.

Perennial spray — Kyle Lanquist, first; Adam Beagle, second.

Any other one bloom — Shandell Beagle.

Cosmos — April Horton, first; Kyle Lanquist, second.

Zinnia — Regina Fox, first, April Horton, second.

Snap dragon — Kyle Lanquist, first; Adam Beagle, second.

Any perennial — Kyle Lanquist, first; Adam Beagle, second.

Canna — Tanner Cole.

Mini rose — Shandell Beagle, first, Kyle Lanquist, second.

Salvia — Kyle Lanquist.

Ageratum, 1 spray — Kyle Lanquist, first; Shandell Beagle, second.

Aster, 1 bloom — Aubry von Stein.

Wavy petunia — Shandell Beagle, first; Kyle Lanquist, second.

Non-flowering house plant — Adam Beagle, first; Kyle Lanquist, second.

Coleus — Shandell Beagle, first; Adam Beagle, second.

Sunflower — Kyle Lanquist, first; Megan Horton, second.

Dusty miller — Kyle Lanquist.

Geranium — Shandell Beagle, first; Adam Beagle, second.

Impatiens — Adam Beagle, first; Shandell Beagle, second.

Marigold large — Tanner Cole, first; Kyle Lanquist, second.

Plumed celosia — Kyle Lanquist, first; Tanner Cole, second.

Crested celosia — Rachael Reichley, first; Kyle Lanquist, second.

Cleome — Kyle Lanquist, first; Aubry von Stein, second.

Zinnia, large bloom — Aubry von Stein.

Vegetables

Grand champion — Austin Lanquist. Reserve champion — Daniel Thorton.

Junior vegetable tray — Aubrey von Stein, champion; Brent Warren, reserve champion.

Senior vegetable tray — Miles von Stein, champion; Caleb von Stein, reserve champion.

Most points — Kyle Lanquist, first; Daniel Horton, second.

Peppers, sweet, long — Ashton Beach, first; Aubry von Stein, second.

Tomato, Italian — Austin Lanquist, first; Brent Warren, second.

Tomato, salad — Daniel Horton, first; Brent Warren, second.

Peppers, hot — Brent Warren, first; Charley Shepler, second.

Tomato, yellow — Brent Warren, first; Austin Lanquist, second.

Cabbage — Austin Lanquist, first; Ashton Beach, second.

Peppers, bell — Aubry von Stein, first; Ashton Beach, second.

Watermelon — Daniel Horton, first; Chad Shepler, second.

Eggplant — Charley Shepler, first; Brent Warren, second.

Onion — Austin Lanquist, first; Daniel Horton, second.

Vegetable tray, junior 9-13 — Aubry von Stein, first; Brent Warren, second.

Potatoes — Aubrey von Stein, first; Caleb von Stein, second.

Cucumbers, slicing — Aubry von Stein, first; Daniel Horton, second.

Cucumbers, picking — Austin Lanquist, first; Lacy Allen, second.

Beans, lima — Austin Lanquist.

Mini pumpkins — Jordan Keckler.

Muskmelon — Aubry von Stein, first; Caleb von Stein, second.

Beets, table — Austin Lanquist.

Sweet corn — Daniel Horton.

Pumpkin — Daniel Horton, first; Jackie Paulhus, second.

Tomatoes — Jackie Paulhus, first; Austin Lanquist, second.

Squash — Daniel Horton.

Gourds — Austin Lanquist, first; Caleb von Stein, second.



Open class

Draft horse show

Draft horse single hitch — Paul Vent, Upper Sandusky, first; Steve Lonsway, Findlay, second.

Farm class single hitch obstacle — Nathan Strasbaugh, Findlay, first; Gene Pore, McComb, second.

Draft horse team — Paul Vent, Upper Sandusky, first; Steve Lonsway, Findlay, second.

Farm class team obstacle — Wayne Smith, Findlay, first; Gene Pore, McComb, second.

Farm class team — Gene Pore, first; Mike Trout, North Baltimore, second.

Draft horse 4-hitch — Steve Lonsway, Findlay, first.

Hobbies and collections

Buttons, sewing: Vicki Walter, Findlay, first; Susan Neal, Arcadia, second.

Coins: Samuel Eckert, Findlay, first; Molly Neal, Arcadia, second.

Shells: Jesse Eckert, Findlay; first; Vette Gibson, Rawson, second.

Dolls (8 inches and under): Molly Neal, Arcadia, first; Lorrene Mason, Findlay, second.

Spoons: Jeremy Walter, Carey, first; Darla Thompson, Findlay, second.

Salt and peppers (5 pair): Shirley Detamore, McComb, first; Linda McRill, Findlay, second.

Animal collections (limit 6): Jamie Dillinger, Forest, first; Michelle Gibbs, McComb, second.

Models (limit 1, under 18 years): Hunter Wallen, Findlay, first; John Warner, McComb, second.

Slogan buttons: Lorrene Mason, Findlay, first; Darla Thompson, Findlay, second.

Advertising: Richard Peterson, Findlay, first; Keith Willford, Findlay, second.

Old musical instrument: Stanford Ruggles, Findlay, first.

Sports star or team (limit 6): Lynn Dorman, Findlay, first; Ben Smith, Findlay second.

Stamps: Angela Tesnow, Findlay, first; Cheryl Collingwood, McComb, second.

Teddy bears: Lynn Dorman, Findlay, first; Lorrene Mason, Findlay, second.

Indian relics: Jerry Augustine, Rawson, first; Molly Neal, Arcadia, second.

Dolls (over 8 inches): Rebekah Frampton, Van Buren, first; Hannah Russell, Findlay, second.

Scrap book (one): Lorrayne Good, Arcadia, first; Becky Wolford, McComb, second.

Basketry (3 items): Lynn Dorman, Findlay, first; Cheryl Conkle, McComb, second.

Bottles: Vette Gibson, Rawson, first; Betty Myers, Arcadia, second.

Models (limit 1): Rick Smith, Findlay, first; Nathan Foley, Findlay, second.

Key chains: Jesse Eckert, Findlay, first; Maggie Morehart, Findlay, second.

Old sheet music (limit 6): Missy Ritter, Bluffton, first; Linda McRill, Findlay, second.

Move star memorabilia: Shirley Detamore, McComb.

Hancock County Fair: Cheryl Conkle, McComb, first; Shirley Detamore, McComb, second.

Toys (limit 6): Keith Willford, Findlay, first; Ian Springer, Findlay, second.

Item not listed (limit 6): Richard Peterson, Findlay, first and best of show; Jill Smith, McComb, second.

Woodworking

Wood carving winners:

Round realistic over 6 inches — John Smith, Findlay, first; Ritchie Ream, Findlay, second.

Round stylized over 6 inches — John Smith, Findlay, first; Nicholas Spurck, Arlington, second.

Realistic round under 6 inches — Ralph Barringer, Van Buren, first; Richard Fenimore, Findlay, second.

Stylized in round — Ralph Barringer.

Flat or relief large — Emil Ziegler, Findlay, first; Nancy Fenimore, Findlay, second.

Flat or relief under 8 inches — Keith McClelland, Findlay.

Best of show — John Smith, Findlay.

Wood carving-walking stick winners:

Top of stick — Richard Fenimore, Findlay, first and best of show.

Whole stick — Keith McClelland, Findlay.

Wood carving-caricatures winners:

Painted, under 6 inches — John Smith, Findlay, first; Emil Ziegler, Findlay, second.

Best of show — Ralph Barringer, Van Buren.

Wood burning winners:

Natural, burnt only — Nancy Fenimore, Findlay, first and best of show; Evelyn Dangler, Bluffton, second.

Furniture winners:

Any large piece — Keith McClelland, Findlay, first; Ron Boyer, Findlay, second.

Lawn furniture — James Miles, Jenera.

Clocks, hanging or mantle — Shalynn Smith, Findlay.

Wood turnings — Dan Dangler, Bluffton, first and second.

Jewelry box — Shalynn Smith, Findlay.

Magazine rack — Shalynn Smith.

Item not listed — Dan Dangler, Bluffton, first; Ralph Barringer, Van Buren, second.

Best of show — Keith McClelland, Findlay.

Miscellaneous/14 years and older winners:

Musical instrumenent, including kits — Robert Conkle, McComb.

Lawn ornament — John Brown, Findlay.

Planter — Shalynn Smith, Findlay.

Models — John Brown, Findlay.

Item not listed — Chelsie Risser, Findlay, first; Hannah Russell, Findlay, second.

Best of show — John Brown, Findlay.

Miscellaneous 6-13 years winners:

Candlestick holder — Hunter Wallen, Findlay.

Jewelry box — Angel Smith, Findlay.

Bird house — Jamey Miles, Jenera, first; Angel Smith, Findlay, second.

Tool carrier — Ben Smith, Findlay.

What not or bookshelf — Hunter Wallen, Findlay, first; Angel Smith, Findlay, second.

Magazine rack — Ben Smith, Findlay.

Planter — Angel Smith, Findlay.

Child's toy — Ben Smith, Findlay, first; Jesse Eckert, Findlay, second.

Item not listed — Luke Schaffer, Findlay, first; Ben Smith, Findlay, second.

Scroll categories, 14 years or older:

Scroll saw, clock — Rick Wilcox, Findlay, first and best of show; Terri Wilcox, Findlay, second.

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Public Record

Docket

The following incidents were reported to the Findlay Police Department and the Hancock County Sheriff’s Office:

Police Department

Someone spray-painted words on a garage at 304 W. Hardin St. prior to 6:15 a.m. Wednesday.

A 2003 Chevrolet Impala was stolen from 203 Edith Ave. prior to 10:30 p.m. Tuesday.

A man was jumped by three or four other men in the 300 block of North Main Street just after 2 a.m. Wednesday.

A man who had gone to Blanchard Valley Hospital for treatment after a drug overdose was arrested on an outstanding warrant when he was released early Wednesday. The man is also facing a new charge of falsification after lying to police about his identity.

An unknown man broke a window at 801 N. Cory St. at about 12:10 a.m. Wednesday.

A refrigerator, freezer, stove and air conditioner were reported stolen from 102 Smith St. on Monday or Tuesday.

Two men are facing burglary charges after they were caught near the same Smith Street residence on Sunday with two bikes and a laundry basket of household items. One of the men told police he had found the items after he and the other man had scared off looters. Police did not believe the man’s story.

Someone attempted to gain entry to an apartment at 600 Grand Ave. on Tuesday. On Monday, someone had broken into another apartment at the same address and stole a computer, printer and compact disc player.

A barrel of copper wire was stolen from 404 N. Cory St. prior to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday.

Three vehicles were broken into at 507 N. Cory St. on Monday or Tuesday.

A man was arrested, and jailed, after he repeatedly called 911 on Tuesday. He told police he was calling the emergency number because he wanted to be taken to jail.

A truck did donuts in a parking lot at 1224 Byal Ave. on Tuesday, kicking up a rock which broke a window at the residence.

$280 was stolen from a vehicle at 1950 Industrial Drive on Tuesday.

Two duffle bags were stolen from a car at 506 N. Main St. on Tuesday.

A vending machine, which had been put outside 230 E. Front St. to dry out from the flood, was stolen between Aug. 24 and Tuesday.

Compact discs and a stereo were stolen from a vehicle at 430 N. Main St. on Monday or Tuesday.

An intoxicated woman was arrested for criminal trespassing after she repeatedly went to 927 Putnam St. on Tuesday after being given a warning not to be there.

A teen was cited for riding a skateboard in the business district at about 11:35 p.m. Monday, about 10 minutes after he had been given a warning about the same behavior.

A 16-year-old boy was reported as missing after he ran away from his Summit Street home on Monday.

A stereo was stolen from a vehicle at 1800 Tiffin Ave. on Monday.

A wallet was stolen from 3430 N. Main St., between Aug. 24 and Monday.

A purse was stolen from the Trenton Avenue Wal-Mart on Sunday or Monday.

Sheriff’s Office

A black utility trailer which had been stolen from 114 N. Main St., Rawson, was recovered in Hardin County on Tuesday. Authorities there have a suspect in custody.

A mailbox was smashed at 1144 Township Road 136, Van Buren, on Aug. 23.

Courthouse

Common Pleas Court

The following activity took place in Hancock County Common Pleas Court:

Jacob M. Kilpatrick, 21, of Findlay, was sentenced to five years of community control sanctions by Judge Reg Routson on a fourth-degree felony unlawful sexual conduct conviction. Kilpatrick had been indicted after he engaged in sexual conduct with a 14-year-old girl in Findlay on Jan. 10. If he fails to complete his sanctions he will have to serve a 17-month prison term.

Doran E. Dixie, 45, of Findlay, was placed on CCS for five years by Judge Joseph Niemeyer on a fifth-degree felony forgery conviction. Dixie was charged after he forged a check in the amount of $3,049 on a Findlay couple’s account. He was ordered to make restitution, to serve 15 days in jail, and 90 days on electronic monitoring while on community control. If he fails to complete his sanctions he will have to serve an 11-month prison term.

The following people entered innocent pleas during arraignment hearings Wednesday:

Michael A. Burns, 26, of Mount Blanchard, possession of cocaine (fourth-degree felony); $7,500 bond established, Sept. 10 pretrial hearing scheduled.

Jason R. Weidman, 25, of Findlay, failure to comply with order or signal of police officer (third-degree felony); released on own recognizance (OR) bond; Sept. 21 pretrial hearing.

Alice Sting Zoll, 40, of Bloomville, theft (fifth-degree felony); OR bond; Sept. 14 pretrial hearing.

Jessica R. Sims, 28, of Findlay, forgery (fifth-degree felony); OR bond; Sept. 21 pretrial hearing.

Real Estate Transfers

Helen N. Pendleton to Darrell S. Pendleton, Lot 30, Dimms Addition, McComb and part of Section 26, Pleasant Township.

Barbara L. Dally to Margaret R. Tuban, Unit 2, Deer Lake I Condo, Findlay.

Aegis Mortgage Corp. to William J. Franks, Lots 9581 and 9588, Ferris Addition, Findlay.

Leon C. and Leona M. Slater to Lois J. Bender, Lot 8378, Hull Addition, Findlay.

R. Douglas and Lisa K. Rogers to Matthew J. and Carole A. Luke, Section 16, 2 acres, Orange Township.

Big Sky Investments, Thomas L. and Rebecca L. Weber to Henry T. Chandler, Lot 9474, Hoxter & Bennett Addition, Findlay.

Donald E. and Karen M. Moses to Nicholas M. Berno and Jami M. Lee, Lots 29-30, D Peters 1st Addition, Arcadia.

Fire Calls

Tuesday

12:17 a.m., 1301 Summit St., good intent call.

10:16 a.m., 218 Allen Ave., EMS call.

1:27 p.m., 1908 Stonehill Drive, EMS call.

2:52 p.m., 1715 Brookside Drive, arcing equipment.

5:28 p.m., 600 Tiffin Ave., vehicle accident.

8:53 p.m., 1320 W. Sandusky St., EMS call.

9 p.m., 3109 Terrace Lane, hazardous materials investigation.

9:18 p.m., 826 Howard St., smoke scare.

Wednesday

9:41 a.m., 344 E. Hardin St., EMS call.

11:42 a.m., 2101 Greendale Ave., vehicle accident.

1 p.m., 702 College St., medical assist.

3:16 p.m., 300 Olive St., good intent call.

5:44 p.m., 1100 Park St., vehicle accident.

7:04 p.m., 308 E. Sawmill Road, EMS call.

8:44 p.m., 226 Ely Ave., trash fire.

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Three countywide issues placed on this fall's ballot

By JIM MAURER

Staff Writer

TIFFIN — Voters will decide the fate of a 0.3-mill, five-year renewal levy for the Seneca County Commission on Aging to maintain senior citizen services and facilities in the county. It's one of three countywide issues on the Seneca County general election ballot Nov. 6.

The Seneca County Opportunity Center, which provides services for the county's mentally retarded/developmentally disabled (MR/DD) population, is seeking a 0.5 mill, five-year levy for current expenses.

The Mental Health & Recovery Services Board is seeking an additional 0.8 mill, five-year levy for counseling and supportive services to children, adults and senior citizens.

Meanwhile, Fostoria residents will decide four amendments to the city charter. There will also be a race between five candidates for two seats on the Fostoria Community Schools Board of Education.

Area school districts and villages will also have issues on the ballot, according to information from the Seneca County Board of Elections.

The deadline passed recently for issues and candidates in non-partisan races to be placed on the general election ballot. Write-in candidates have until Sept. 5 to file their intentions to seek office in November.

If approved by voters, the charter amendments will:

• Create staggered four-year terms for city council members and council president.

• Make the law director position an appointment by the mayor, with city council approval, rather than an elected position.

• Make the assistant fire chief position an appointment by the mayor, either from within the department or from outside the department.

• Make elections non-partisan for city officials.

For Fostoria school board, incumbent J. Pete Cardenas, 1004 Gerlock Drive, will seek a second four-year term, as will incumbent William McGough, 339 W. Fremont St. They will be on the ballot along with three individuals for two available seats on the five-member board.

Other candidates include: Lorrel Filliater, 802 W. Center St.; Thomas C. Guernsey, 3209 Stuart Road; and Tim Masel, 853 Oak Cove Drive.

There are also several races for township trustees within the county.

A local liquor option to allow Sunday sales of beer only at Yesenia's Mexican Store, Fostoria, also was placed on the ballot.

Contact Staff Writer Jim Maurer at:

(419) 427-8420

jimmaurer@thecourier.com

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